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Author Topic: Curtiss XP-55 Ascender canard fighter (Model CW-24)  (Read 32795 times)

Offline XP67_Moonbat

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Re: Curtiss XP-55 Ascender canard fighter (Model CW-24)
« Reply #105 on: October 31, 2015, 02:04:45 pm »
Any chance that Justo could re-post the Jet Ascender stuff he HAD posted here very recently?
In God we trust, all others we monitor. :-p

Offline Boxman

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Re: Curtiss XP-55 Ascender canard fighter (Model CW-24)
« Reply #106 on: July 16, 2016, 06:50:27 pm »
Here's some nice ground and ground-to-air newsreel footage of the Curtiss XP-55 Ascender (USAAF Ser. No. 42-78846) posted on YouTube by Buyout Footage Historic HD Film Archive.

Strangely enough, the most "startling" portion of the footage to me was the range of travel of the all-moving elevator.

Offline Motocar

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Re: Curtiss XP-55 Ascender canard fighter (Model CW-24)
« Reply #107 on: May 31, 2017, 03:19:23 am »
I have a cutaway of the XP-55 jet retouched from one published here, can I share it on the topic ...? Here I leave the link where I publish it in the themes "User Artwork":

http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,23005.msg307194.html#new

Offline hesham

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Re: Curtiss XP-55 Ascender canard fighter (Model CW-24)
« Reply #108 on: July 13, 2018, 05:09:11 am »
From Le Fana 224,

the early study for XP-55.

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: Curtiss XP-55 Ascender canard fighter (Model CW-24)
« Reply #109 on: July 13, 2018, 02:48:46 pm »
Le Fana simply reused these images from the AAHS article by Gerald H. Balzer (Part 3A, Summer 1996).
This particular part of the article had 24 pages, no less! Absolute must read for anyone interested in that program.
The article also contained two full general arrangement views of the CW-24B, both in its early and final configurations, which I'm reproducing here in a smaller size.

Offline sienar

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Re: Curtiss XP-55 Ascender canard fighter (Model CW-24)
« Reply #110 on: July 13, 2018, 07:45:20 pm »
Le Fana simply reused these images from the AAHS article by Gerald H. Balzer (Part 3A, Summer 1996).
This particular part of the article had 24 pages, no less! Absolute must read for anyone interested in that program.
The article also contained two full general arrangement views of the CW-24B, both in its early and final configurations, which I'm reproducing here in a smaller size.

American Secret Pusher Fighters by the same author has the drawings too, and probably easier to come by.

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: Curtiss XP-55 Ascender canard fighter (Model CW-24)
« Reply #111 on: July 14, 2018, 03:28:13 am »
American Secret Pusher Fighters by the same author has the drawings too, and probably easier to come by.

But the Fana article is quite an old one (July 1988, I think). At that time, there were no "Secret this" or "Secret that" books on the market, since except for the Third Reich Luftwaffe ones, which have always fascinated people somehow, virtually no-one would have spent a penny on a book dedicated solely to projects!

Offline riggerrob

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Re: Curtiss XP-55 Ascender canard fighter (Model CW-24)
« Reply #112 on: July 14, 2018, 08:59:04 am »
Here's some nice ground and ground-to-air newsreel footage of the Curtiss XP-55 Ascender (USAAF Ser. No. 42-78846) posted on YouTube by Buyout Footage Historic HD Film Archive.

Strangely enough, the most "startling" portion of the footage to me was the range of travel of the all-moving elevator.


覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧

That large range (canard control surface) reminds us of the (current production) Eurofighter Typhoon. That extra up travel helps two ways after landing. First, it forces the nosewheel onto the runway, improving directional control. Secondly, steeply raised canards work as air brakes after landing.

My general impression is that Curtiss Ascendef was primarily a flying wing with a small trimming surface on the nose. Many designers have experimented with this configuration,  it few have succeeded. This contrasts with Burt Rutan痴 - late 20th century - canards where the canard provides a significant amount of lift.

Offline sienar

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Re: Curtiss XP-55 Ascender canard fighter (Model CW-24)
« Reply #113 on: July 14, 2018, 10:13:14 am »
My general impression is that Curtiss Ascendef was primarily a flying wing with a small trimming surface on the nose. Many designers have experimented with this configuration,  it few have succeeded. This contrasts with Burt Rutan痴 - late 20th century - canards where the canard provides a significant amount of lift.

That is the case.

Also they expected the aircraft to have a higher critical mach than a normal configuration but this was believed to be because of the lack of a normal tail. Its possible that some of the observed wind tunnel results were due to the wing sweep and this simply wasnt recognized at the time.

Offline rinkol

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Re: Curtiss XP-55 Ascender canard fighter (Model CW-24)
« Reply #114 on: July 17, 2018, 12:40:09 pm »
There was a widely held idea in the 1940s that a conventional tail would limit the achievable mach number. and that the elimination of tail surfaces would be advantageous for transonic flight.  The good performance (for the time) of the Me 163 provided at least superficial support for this assessment.  There were various attempts to implement this idea, such as the X-4, F7U and DH 108, but  the aerodynamics of such aircraft were not well understood at the time and the results were mostly unsatisfactory.

I suspect that the wind tunnel investigations of aircraft such as the XP-55 and XP-56  provided optimistic results, though there is the possibility that adverse results may have been discounted.