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Author Topic: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...  (Read 43485 times)

Offline Skyblazer

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All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« on: May 28, 2013, 09:13:16 am »
No other country has seen as many aircraft designs as the United States.

Apart from those emanating from the big industrial companies, many of these have largely fallen into oblivion... Sometimes they appear in a corner of an old magazine and we think "Wow! Never heard about THAT ONE!", and obviously the more types we know, the more there seems to still discover...

I'm starting this topic with the purpose of it being a place to regroup all these isolated and worthwhile prototypes, mostly homebuilts. Let's not post types from major companies here, only from small businesses or individuals.

PLEASE can we stick to this rule: ONE TYPE = ONE POST? This way it will be easier to move posts around when/if a separate topic becomes justified.

Let's also apply this principle to our replies, so that if we reply about a certain type, we 1°) quote from the original post (which could be a few posts/pages before) and 2°) reply ONLY about that type. If multiply replies are needed, let's reply under separate posts. Thanks in advance!

I'm starting with the next post..

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2013, 09:15:41 am »
Here is the Option Air Acapella 100L [N360 CB]. It crashed on July 28, 1982.

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2013, 09:17:47 am »
The Aero-Dynamics Sparrow Hawk [N5832M]:

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2013, 09:20:20 am »
The Ward RA « Super BD-4 » [N62RW] was the improbable hybrid of a Bede BD-4 fuselage, a Cessna 172's undercart, and a Swearingen SX-200's nose and engine!

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2013, 09:25:33 am »
This apparently undesignated Miller biplane entirely made of plywood was built in Milwaukee in the after-war years. It took 850 hours of work on its inventor's spare time and 500 dollars' worth of material to get it completed. It had a wingspan of 4.6 m and a length of 4.1 m, and was powered by a Henderson engine. Miller, a licensed mechanic and student-pilot, claimed a speed of 230 km/h and a range of 640 km for his diminutive biplane.

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #5 on: May 28, 2013, 09:51:42 am »
Completely forgotten (and therefore presumably unsuccessful) was this pleasant little postewar machine, the Bolton 1-B (thanks a lot to walter for identifying it).

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #6 on: May 28, 2013, 10:08:04 am »
Cliff Kysor's torpedo-shaped plane of 1950 had tail controls built flush with fuselage. The conventional elevators and rudder were eliminated to minimize air drag and permit greater speed. The four control surfaces at the top, bottom and sides of the tail section, were operated by a stick and by rudder pedals. Small tabs at the trailing edge of the fins were used only to trim the aircraft.

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #7 on: May 28, 2013, 11:39:33 am »
An amazing homebuilt that still exists to this day: the Bowyer BW-1 Challenger.

We have a topic devoted to this beauty here: http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,19592.0

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #8 on: May 28, 2013, 01:47:32 pm »
In 1966, the Mississippi-based Burns Aircraft Co. presented the 6-7 place BA-42 twin-engine business aircraft prototype. It was powered by two 210 hp Continental IO-360D engines with constant-speed MacCauley propellers. A pressurized version was planned, offered with either the same engines or a pair of Allison 250 turbines. The BA-42 was of aluminum construction with numerous plastic components. First flight took place on April 28.

Wingspan: 8.7 m
Length: 9.75 m
Height: 2.3 m
Maximum weight: 1950 kg
Empty weight: 1086 kg
Maximum speed (sea level): 375 km/h
Cruise speed (at 3000 m altitude and with 75% of power): 275 km/h
Range (with 75% of power): 1450 km


Offline elmayerle

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #9 on: May 28, 2013, 01:57:52 pm »
The vertical tail looks a bit on the small side and the engines are probably pushed hard, but it's not a bad design.  Switching to the turboprops likely won't change the weight but should definitely improve performance.

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #10 on: May 28, 2013, 02:19:15 pm »
The wacky and wonderful Wainfan FMX-4 Facetmobile [N117WD—a play on the F-117 resemblance] was described as an "experimental lifting-body sportplane." It was the creation of Barnaby & Lynne Wainfan and Rick Dean, and took 2.5 years to develop and build. It was inspired originally by a little flying wing glider in one of the aeromodelling magazines some years ago, and then further by a larger model that he made based on it.

After logging 130 hours of flight time, the Facetmobile was damaged in a forced landing after some engine malfunction, and was in reconstruction in 1999. A two-place version designated as the FMX-5 was also in development at that time, but apparently nothing came of it.

More on Wainfan:
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,19333.0
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,9989.0 (senior members only)
« Last Edit: May 28, 2013, 03:02:08 pm by Stargazer2006 »

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #11 on: May 28, 2013, 02:39:04 pm »
The Sawyer Skyjacker II [N7317] was a two-seat experimental research vehicle, a flying wing of all-metal construction built by Ralph Sawyer and first flown on July 3, 1975.

Sawyer’s objective for constructing this vehicle was to prove the stability, controllability and capability of such a radical, low-aspect-ratio aircraft, the size for this type of aircraft being unlimited due to the nature of its lifting body design.  In fact, it was even marketed in its day as the only flying "true lifting body"—not as a sporting aircraft.

Sawyer's design calculations determined the aircraft would be able to carry 4.5 times the load as a typical aircraft with the same span. The airplane was named the Skyjacker because "it jacks itself into the sky."

The Skyjacker was cheap to build because there wereno compound curves, highly stressed areas or complex control systems. The design would not stall or spin and had no rudders. The aircraft was powered by a 200hp Lycoming IO-360-A1B6D pusher engine. Its span was 18 ft. and it was 17 ft. 6 in. long. It is not known what the #I design may have been.

Great info and pics can be found at:
« Last Edit: May 28, 2013, 02:52:00 pm by Stargazer2006 »

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #12 on: May 28, 2013, 02:58:25 pm »
The Schapel SA-882 was a diminutive flying wing prototype not unlike some of the Horten designs:

More here: http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,13386.0

The company had quite a few projects on the side — all pushers, such as the Thunderbolt business aircraft or the twin-boom S-1275 Finesse, S-525 Super Swat and SA-981 Swat (a light COIN proposal).

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #13 on: May 28, 2013, 03:19:42 pm »
Designed and flown by Ron Beattie and Walt Fellers, two North American Engineers who came to work for the Northrop Division, the Acme Sierra (a.k.a. "Sierra Sue") [N12K] was built by the Acme Aircraft Co. at the Torrance Airport in late 1948. The first flight took place on 23 November 1953. It was built according to Goodyear Racing Plane specifications. Although it was never entered in any races, extensive data was obtained during its many flights.

This experimental aircraft was built to investigate the advantages of a pusher propeller configuration. It has a "Y" shaped tail incorporating ruddervators on the upper fins, an unswept wing mounted midway up the fuselage, an engine mounted directly behind the cockpit, and large air scoops mounted in the forward end of both wing roots. The aircraft, now designated as the Sierradyne S-1, was used by Sierradyne Inc. in the 1960's to test and promote Northrop's and Dr Werner Pfenninger's boundary layer control concepts. Northrop used it as a flying technology demonstrator for the Air Force’s AX close-support aircraft design competition in 1972, but despite its being re-labeled as the Northrop Turbo-Pusher, the plane was never officially considered a Northrop aircraft.

The aircraft's relationship to the AX program is also discussed twice in the AX-dedicated topic:
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,2615.msg10250.html#msg10250
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,2615.msg107687.html#msg107687

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #14 on: May 28, 2013, 03:28:30 pm »
The Fogle V333 Sky Cat tilt-rotor was built in 1982 but never been flown. It was designed and built by Hal Fogle, who also worked on the SR-71 Blackbird program.

Photos below depict the prototype (now on display at the Carolinas Aviation Museum) and the full-scale mockup that preceded it, at some airshow.

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2013, 03:34:51 pm »
Fred Smith, president of Frederick-Ames Research Corporation at Novi, Michigan, USA, designed a small single-seat sporting aircraft called the EOS (after the Greek goddess of the dawn) [N10AE], which first appeared in an incomplete form at the 1973 EAA Fly-in at Oshkosh. On its maiden flight on April 25, 1974, the 55 hp Hirth 650 cc engine seized and the aircraft crash landed, causing extensive damage. Despite some restoration work, the aircraft was abandoned through lack of finance.

 In early 1978 the project was revived, with a modified Volkswagen motor car engine in place of the original engine. First flight of the reworked aircraft was in mid-1978, piloted by Robert Bishop. By August 1978 the EOS had completed about ten flying hours, and further modifications to the aircraft had been made. Eventually the release of plans and/or kits was never realized, and the prototype remains the only example ever built.

More info (and another pic) at 1000aircraftphotos:
http://1000aircraftphotos.com/Contributions/SmithRon/11610.htm

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #16 on: May 28, 2013, 03:58:29 pm »
The Halsmer Aero Car [N9085C] was built in 1959 by Joseph L. Halsmer of Lafayette, Indiana was one of the numerous attempts at building a roadable aircraft (and it is quite remarkable that this Seaboard World Airlines captain and father of 11 children could find any time at all to get this airplane built and flown!)

 The Aero Car was a high-wing monoplane with two engines in a tractor-pusher configuration, a tri-cycle gear and tail booms. Helsmer built this machine over a two-year period, and later converted into the single-engine pusher Aero Car 3 presented in 1963 (see photos below), powered by a Continental C-85-12 engine.

Halsmer also built a high-wing two-seater [N12043] (possibly the Aero Car 2) with a uni-twin arrangement of two 65 hp engines driving two counter-rotating props.

Also see: http://1000aircraftphotos.com/Contributions/GauthierDavidJ/7493.htm

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #17 on: May 28, 2013, 04:09:13 pm »
The Heuberger-Rinker H-5 Stinger [N3638G] was yet another one-off, built at Tucumcari, New Mexico. This two-seat aircraft powered by a 140 hp Lycoming O-290-G engine was an original design by Lawrence K. "Larry" Heuberger, who started its construction around the early 1960s. Prior to completion the project was acquired (around 1968) by Bud Rinker of Santa Barbara, Cal., who almost certainly did some limited testing in 1970. This truly one-of-a-kind aircraft still exists in pretty good condition, as shown in photo below.

More pics and discussion here: http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=5158.0
More pics in hi-res at: http://whotalking.com/flickr/Heuberger-Rinker

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #18 on: May 28, 2013, 04:28:38 pm »
The Horton HW-X-26-52 Wingless [N39C] was a highly-modified Cessna UC-78 Bobcat with a more airfoil-shaped fuselage than wing — although the original airframe's lines were really not apparent in the finished product! It was Horton's second experiment (the first being a single-engined lifting-body type [N87698]) and was designed and built by Bill Horton in a three-way partnership with Howard Hughes and Harlow Curtice (of General Motors fame). The aircraft was not of riveted construction but was a welded steel frame covered with a fabric skin and powered by two Pratt and Whitney R-985 radial engines.

The Wingless failed not because the it didn't or couldn't fly... Actually it logged around 160 hrs of flight time before Bill Horton had a falling out with Howard Hughes. The latter wanted to take full credit for the patents and production rights, which Horton refused to do. To prove that money talks, Hughes slapped a law suit on Horton that effectively stopped any further development of the aircraft until this day. Hughes managed to have Horton railroaded to prison on trumped up charges and to get both the prototype and its partially constructed production version moved to a bone yard and destroyed.


Much more info and lots of pics in this forum's fascinating thread about William Horton's wingless designs, built and unbuilt:
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,5996.0.htm

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #19 on: May 29, 2013, 06:24:02 am »
The Carma VT-1 Weejet [N8209H] was one of the rare civilian jet prototypes developed in the 1950s and  the first jet aircraft in the small plane field submitted to the CAA. It was designed and built by Harold Dale, a project engineer with North American who was working on the F-100 at the time. Like many other enthusiasts working in the industry, he set out to conceive his ideal jet trainer in his spare time.

Dale's project was a mid-wing cantilever monoplane of aluminium alloy structure, with slotted flaps, leading edge intake ducts, semi-monocoque fuselage, upwards opening doors, butterfly tail unit and retractable tricycle landing gear. It would have side-by-side seating in front of the wing for clear visibility all around. It should have a slow landing speed and a comfortable cruising speed of 350 mph. To help him in his task, Dale got assistance from his wife Eleanor, who also had an engineering degree and handled much of the mathematics, administration, etc. The name chosen was the Weejet 800 (WE=Harold and Eleanor), the 800 meaning the power class of the licence built Turbomeca Marboré II engine of 880 lb thrust.

 The Carma Manufacturing Co., a local aircraft parts manufacturer, heard of the design and got involved in the project and offered to built the aircraft. Construction started at Tucson in the second half of 1954 and five people worked one and a half years on it. First flight took place on March 30, 1956, with Harold Dale at the controls. During the following weeks further test flights were made by another pilot, except for the spin tests; the aircraft handled and performed well.

Now designated the VT-1 Weejet, it was proposed  on March 25, 1956 to the US Navy, who showed some interest and decided to evaluate it at Patuxent, but before delivery of the aircraft, the spin tests had to be performed. Unfortunately, during the final spin test USAF pilot Doneby inadvertently activated the trim tab into full nose-down position, lost control while trying to recover and had to bail out. Later data was found thrown clear of the wreckage, showing the spin tests were a complete success. However, the Weejet crashed and burned, and all work was interrupted.

A variant designated the Weejet 1300 was considered in June 1957, powered by two Fiat model 4002 centrifugal flow engines with 650 lb thrust. However the Temco's TT-1 Pinto was eventually procured by the Navy and both Dale and Carma probably didn't have the financial backing that could have enabled them to make that project come alive.


Much more about the Weejet (a lot of the above info comes directly from the second link—walter's great site):

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #20 on: May 29, 2013, 06:30:44 am »
The Peterson Hi-Hopes [N5960V] was an open single-seater built by Peter Peterson of Davenport, Iowa. Powered by an 85 hp Continental C-85 four-cylinder horizontal-opposed air-cooled engine, it was flown in September 1960. It had a wingspan of 20 ft. and was 17 ft. long.

More about the Hi-Hopes: http://1000aircraftphotos.com/Contributions/GauthierDavidJ/7641.htm

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #21 on: May 29, 2013, 06:38:55 am »
Despite its superficial resemblance to a Pitts S-2, the Panzl Pan 1 [N11ZL] is an original 1987 homebuilt experimental biplane that won the EAA's Champion Custom Plans Built award at Oshkosh in 1990. It was substantially damaged on March 18, 2003 during impact with terrain following a forced landing attempt near Vernal, Utah.  The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant on board, received minor injuries.

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #22 on: May 29, 2013, 07:10:50 am »
Dewey Eldred's Flyer's Dream [NX36282] was a very original prototype floatplane designed by Dewey Eldred and Sol Fingerhut. Built in 1946 in Willoughby, Ohio, it featured an automobile-like nacelle mounted on top of a 30-ft span W-shaped wing placed in lowermost position. Its tail was mounted at the end of twin-booms extending attached to the rear of the floats. It used a 125 hp engine and first flew June 4, 1946.

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #23 on: May 29, 2013, 07:39:40 am »
The OMAC-1 was a 6-8 seat canard pusher business aircraft introduced in 1981. OMAC Inc. was founded in 1977 in Reno, Nevada, by Carl Parise and Larry Heuberger. The name stood for "Old Man's Aircraft Company". Two prototypes were built: the first one [apparently unregistered] was powered by a 700 hp Avco Lycoming LTP 101-700A-1 engine and first flew on Dec. 11, 1981, while the second one [N81PH] used a 700 hp Garrett TPE331-9 and flew on February 19, 1983. It was 30 ft. long and had a wingspan of 35 ft.


Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #24 on: May 29, 2013, 07:46:50 am »
The OMAC company moved in 1985 to Albany in Georgia and worked an improved production version, the Laser 300 [N301L] which first flew on July 29, 1988 (pictures showing an aircraft registered "N300L" are only promotional artist's views). The aircraft apparently failed to attract any orders and was no longer heard of. Other similar projects tried to find their niche on the business aircraft market, such as the Avtek 400, the AASI JetCruzer 500, the Beechcraft Starship or the Piaggio Avanti but only the latter two enjoyed any degree of success and reached production stage.
« Last Edit: May 29, 2013, 08:02:26 am by Stargazer2006 »

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #25 on: May 29, 2013, 08:14:20 am »
The Advanced Composite SUA-7 (for Sport Utility Aircraft, 7 seats) [N3061L] was designed by Andreas Montgomery and William K. Regester and built in the early 2000s (the company was known as KLS Composites at the time). The aircraft was mostly made of composite materials and designed to accept automotive V8 engines, such as the GM (Chevrolet) 502 V8 engine that was installed on the prototype. It was presented at the 2003 Fly-In but not flown until a few months later.

After disappointing performance on its early flight testing, the wings were discovered to be inadequate and a new pair of wings was fitted in 2005. On the first day of test flying with the new wings the nose gear got broken, and further improvements were made. From then on the SUA-7 flew amazingly well, but the money behind the company pulled back and the plane has been sitting on the tarmac since.

More on the SUA-7: http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,10888.msg133616.html#msg133616

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #26 on: May 29, 2013, 08:35:26 am »
The Larkin Aircraft Corporation was set up by Keith Larkin in the mid-sixties  in Scotts Valley, California.

The Larkin KC-3 Skylark [N1LA] was a single-engine amphibious  two-seater homebuilt aircraft, a pusher-style design with a single 100 hp Volkswagen air-cooled engine above and behind the fully enclosed cockpit. The cockpit seats two occupants in side-by-side configuration, with a large Plexiglas canopy curving around both occupants. The landing gear is a tricycle arrangement with the nose gear positioned at the foremost point of the nose and the two main gear semi-recessed into teardrop-shaped fairings on the lower sides. The fuselage and landing gear were internally supported with an aluminum tube keel.

The tail was a twin-boom arrangement attached at the trailing edge of the wings, allowing clearance for the pusher propeller above and within the booms. The booms were attached to the wings and connected at the rear, between twin vertical stabilizers, by one single-elevator surface. One unique feature of the airplane’s structure was the use of a square tubular aluminum keel which was responsible for the loads from the landing gear and the main fuselage. The Skylark was also capable of amphibious operation when fitted with an optional V-shaped lower hull made out of fiberglass. Only one aircraft was built and flown, circa 1972-73.


More on the Skylark:

Offline Archibald

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #27 on: May 29, 2013, 10:12:52 am »
Edward Lanier "Paraplane".

http://www.1000aircraftphotos.com/PRPhotos/LanierParaplane1.htm

 The Lanier (father and son) were convinced they had invented the best thing since bread came in slice. In fact they just re-invented Handley Page flaps of 1919... in the 40's.
They were aparently inspired by... ice cream cones inherent stability.  :o
At least they build extremely-odd looking aircrafts that were detailed in Le Fana de l'Aviation 371 (year 2000).
The one below is one of the most "reasonable" designs they come by. Imagine the others.  ::)

Conservatoire de l'Air et de l'Espace d'Aquitaine
http://www.caea.info/en/plan.php

Profanity: weaker mind trying to speak forcefully

Political correctness: just bury your head in the sand for the sake of appeasement and "peace for our time"
- https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serge_Dassault#Affaires_

Offline Bill Walker

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #28 on: May 29, 2013, 12:19:44 pm »
I hope we can include non-US obscure aircraft in this thread.  Here is the third prototype Trident Trigull, c.1978, at Victoria, BC.  Thats me on the left, without grey hair.

It looks a lot like a Seabee, because it was orignially designed by the same man, Spence Spencer.  He developed a home built based on the Seabee, called the Spencer Aerocar, in the 1960s.  The Trigull started as a productionized Aerocar.

Bill Walker

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #29 on: May 29, 2013, 12:54:31 pm »
I hope we can include non-US obscure aircraft in this thread.

Canada is fine of course. I have taken a habit of filing Canadian and American aircraft in the same general directories myself, anyway.

Let's keep this thread strictly for Northern American types though. Let's also exclude rotorcraft (I'll create a separate topic) so that it doesn't become too generic...

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #30 on: May 29, 2013, 04:09:00 pm »
The Lesher SN-1 Nomad was the brainchild of Edward Lesher, an aeronautical teacher at the University of Michigan. It was a small two-seat all-metal pusher with an aluminum semi-monocoque fuselage and side-by-side seating for improved visibility. The 100 hp Continental O-200 engine was placed immediately behind the cockpit, fed with air intakes at the wing roots. The wing was built as a single assembly with a very simple profile and no dihedral. The vee-tailed empennage and vertical fin in low position was meant to impair the Hartzell propeller's efficiency as little as possible, while the vertical fin placed below helped to keep the propeller clear from the ground.

Construction began in 1959 and the Nomad flew late in 1961. The Nomad was followed by the better-known Lesher Teal, which also remained a prototype.

More on the Lesher prototypes: http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,12399.0

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #31 on: May 29, 2013, 04:22:00 pm »
In the late 1990s Duncan Aviation of Michigan developed its Xantus V/STOL design [N44CX], named after a species of hummingbird and designed by Terry Duncan, a lead engineer for Williams International. It featured four 80 hp Hirth F30 engines placed at wingtips fore and aft of the fuselage, and was unveiled to the public for the first time at AirVenture '99. The company predicted that the four-passenger tilt-prop aircraft would take off and land vertically, and cruise at 290 mph with a range of up to 800 nm. After receiving an airworthiness certificate from the FAA on July 7, 1999, the aircraft made its first tentative hovering flight on July 11. Its current disposition is unknown.

More on the Xantus: http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php?topic=7355.0

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #32 on: May 29, 2013, 04:38:34 pm »
Terence O'Neill's Pea Pod [N10T] of 1963 was an odd diminutive machine in which the pilot lay in a prone position, with most of his body inside the wing. It was powered by a 35 hp Kiekhaefer O-4-35 boat engine mounted inside the vertical fin, and could be carried atop the family car. Taxi tests were performed, but it could not meet FAR 103 requirements and reportedly never flew — hardly surprising considering the questionable aerodynamics and apparently insufficient wing loading of the design...

More on the Pea Pod: http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,19239.0

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #33 on: May 29, 2013, 04:58:11 pm »
In February 1959, two former Piasecki engineers formed the Vanguard Air and Marine Corporation to design and build an executive VTOL aircraft. Their first design, the Vanguard 2C Omniplane [apparently not registered] used a 25-ft long Ercoupe light plane fuselage and weighed 2,600 lb. The round wings each housed a 6 ft diameter three-bladed propeller that was mechanically driven for vertical flight by a 265 hp Lycoming O-540-A1A six cylinder piston engine. During forward flight, covers above the rotors and louvers below sealed the wing for aerodynamic lift. Forward thrust was produced by a 5 ft diameter shrouded propeller in the tail. Elevator and rudder surfaces immediately behind the rear fan controlled pitch and yaw, while differential propeller blade pitch affected roll in hover.

Ground tests, starting in August 1959 and including tethered hover trials, were followed by NASA full-scale wind tunnel testing. Modifications to the Omniplane in 1961, including an improved control system, upgrading to a 860 hp Lycoming YT53-L-1 turboshaft engine, and 5 ft nose extension to house a third lifting propeller, led to the redesignation 2D. The nose propeller improved control in pitch as well as in yaw, through the use of movable exit vanes. The 2D completed tethered hover tests, but was damaged by a mechanical failure and discontinued in early 1962.


Source: http://www.vstol.org/VSTOLWheel/VanguardOmniplane.htm

Much more on the Omniplane at xplanes.free.fr: Page 1 | Page 2 | Page 3

More on other Vanguard projects: http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,969.0.html
« Last Edit: May 29, 2013, 05:00:18 pm by Stargazer2006 »

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #34 on: May 29, 2013, 05:24:56 pm »
Around 1980 Burt Rutan was engaged by Tom Jewett, whom he had known at Bede, and Jewett's associate, Gene Sheehan, to help design an airplane that would carry ease of construction and low cost to the extreme, even at the expense of performance. That airplane became the Quickie. Rutan's involvement ended after testing of the prototype; Jewett and Sheehan then marketed the tiny 18­ hp airplane as a kit. The Quickie Aircraft Corp. installed itself in a hangar at the opposite end of the Mojave Airport from Rutan's.

Himself an aeronautical engineer, Jewett designed, and the Quickie Aircraft shop staff started building, an airplane called Big Bird in which Jewett intended to break the absolute distance record for unrefueled airplanes, set in 1962 at 12,519 miles by a B-52. The aircraft featured a unique landing gear dolly, which was designed to be jettisoned after the airplane took off on its record-attempting flight. At the completion of the flight, the airplane was to be landed on a wooden skid on the bottom of the aircraft. Burt Rutan thought ill of the design, and after he fell out with Jewett and Sheehan, the principals of Quickie Aircraft and RAF repeatedly sniped at each other in unseemly ways on the ramp at Mojave and in the aviation press.

After a hostile encounter on the airport camp with Jewett and Sheehan, Dick Rutan proposed to Burt that they do Jewett one better and build an airplane that could fly unrefueled all the way around the world.The Rutan brothers soon made a public announcement of their goal, reducing Big Bird to insignificance even before it had flown. Stung, Jewett quickly announced the same goal for Big Bird — which he rechristened Free Enterprise [N82X] — though his airplane was not really equal to the task. Jewett insisted that it was, but he never got the chance to prove it: the Free Enterprise crashed during testing, taking his life. Ironically, the goal initially set by Jewett was finally achieved by Dick Rutan and Jeanna Yeager in Burt Rutan's Voyager.

Adapted from an article published in the February 1989 issue of Flying.

More on the crash of the "Big Bird": http://www.check-six.com/Crash_Sites/N82X-Jewett.htm
Also see:
http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1982/1982%20-%200220.html
http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1982/1982%20-%200221.html
« Last Edit: May 30, 2013, 04:15:37 pm by Stargazer2006 »

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #35 on: May 31, 2013, 04:12:48 pm »
Al Backstrom's tailless WPB-1 was a powered version of the Plank sailplane which he originally helped to design and build in the 1950s. Construction of the powered Plank was begun in 1972, most of the work being done by Van White, a director of the EAA (Experimental Aircraft Association). It was intended originally to fit a Sachs Wanzel or OMC snowmobile Wankel engine, but as neither became available, a fan-cooled single-ignition Kiekhaefer Aeromarine 440 was installed, driving a two-bladed pusher propeller via belts.

The original tandem-wheel/outrigger undercarriage was replaced by a more robust tricycle unit in 1976. Fuselage was of tubular structure, the wings were of wood and the whole airframe was fabric-covered. A two-seat version was also planned.

Source: Flight, 9 July 1977 (an item which was humorously entitled "Flying plank").

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #36 on: June 01, 2013, 05:06:38 am »
The one-off Hoops SP-1 [N2149] from Anaheim, Los Angeles, on which I could find no information, besides the fact that it was built in 1978 and was for sale in 2009.

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #37 on: June 04, 2013, 12:38:57 pm »
The Geraci Jeep-O-Plane
2-seat sport
one 90hp Continental C90 piston engine
wingspan ca.8ft
DETAILS: This unusual configuration homebuilt was a design of Mr. Al Geraci and developed in co-operation with Mr. William J. Simonini and was completed in 1956. The aircraft, named Jeep-O-Plane, made one flight only and further work was then halted. The aircraft was sometimes referred to as Alliance X and it featured a pusher engine installation (one 90hp Continental C90) and staggered wings with large interconnecting end plates. The one-of-a-kind aircraft (registration N275) featured a wing configuration as later also found on several of the French Starck designs (qv).


« Last Edit: June 05, 2013, 01:46:04 am by PaulMM (Overscan) »

Offline Mark Nankivil

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #38 on: June 05, 2013, 09:24:02 am »
Hi All -

The Backstrom WPB-1 is on display at the Airpower Museum in Blakesburg, IA - I have some print photos of it buried somewhere in a box.  I also have drawings and an article on it from a vintage issue of EAA's Sport Aviation magazine I'll dig out and post too.  It's been long on my list of "to do" R/C electric models.

Plank is the standard term for an unswept constant chord flying wing.  An appropriate moniker...

Enjoy the Day!  Mark

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #39 on: June 06, 2013, 01:37:36 am »
McWhirter Skyrider (NX40000).
This obscure light plane appeared around 1946 and was attributed to a Mister (or Company?) McWhirter. It was reportedly intended as flying ambulance and had a 185hp Continental E185 engine.
I understand a picture (and some details?) may have appeared in the September 1946 issue of Popular Aviaton, but unfortunately I donot have access to that copy  :'(
   

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #40 on: June 06, 2013, 01:40:08 am »
Here is a picture showing the registration.


Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #41 on: June 06, 2013, 07:37:22 am »
The Unusual Rotor Wing Ultra-Stol (N25RW) was developed in California in the late-1970s. It was reported as the Ultra-Stol by a company named Rotor Wing System and reportedly the aircraft flew at least twice.
It had a relatively small wing and engines were reported as two Continental C85s and the rear could be tilted!.  A very similar aircraft (maybe a rebuilt of the first?) was photographed by me in 1984 at Brown Field (near San Diego Ca), but it did not show a registration and was almost certainly never really completed. It differed in having a new wings, possibly from a Cessna Ce.150 and small canards. A company named High Technology Aircraft System, Inc (also in California). may be connected with this aircraft.
The yellow aircraft is N25RW, the other is the unregistered at Brown Field.   

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #42 on: June 06, 2013, 07:39:07 am »
this is the one at Brown Field.
 

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #43 on: June 06, 2013, 08:31:31 am »
this is the one at Brown Field.

Wow! Looks like someone found the remains of a crashed Britten-Norman Trislander and a crashed Dyke Delta and tried to piece the remaining parts together!!! Thanks a lot for sharing these rarities, Walter.

Offline ksimmelink

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #44 on: June 06, 2013, 09:33:46 pm »
My all time favorite, is from the masters on one-off aircraft.  Scaled Composites / Rutan.  It is the Model 202 Boomerang.  I saw it at Oshkosh one year and its quirkiness has always stuck with me.
"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return."

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #45 on: June 07, 2013, 01:33:32 am »
My all time favorite, is from the masters on one-off aircraft.  Scaled Composites / Rutan.  It is the Model 202 Boomerang.  I saw it at Oshkosh one year and its quirkiness has always stuck with me.

You've got good taste. It is still Burt Rutan's own personal favorite!

Also, it almost got produced as the Morrow MB-300 Sky Taxi...

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #46 on: June 07, 2013, 08:13:14 am »
Allied A-2 (NX3153K
The A-2 was an original design by the Allied Aircraft Corporation and the first prototype (NX3153K) first flew on 9 April 1948 under the power of a 145hp Continental C145-2 engine. It was followed by a second prototpe (which was destroyed in a hangar fire) and a third example was not completed and development was then shelved. NX3153K was later extensively modified (around 1970?) by Mr. Thomas J. Ballentine who amongst others installed a 210hp Continental IO-360 and it was renamed as TJ-2 and registered N312TJ.
The aircraft is now in the collection of the Kansas Aviation Museum, Wichita, Ks and received it original designation back. 

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #47 on: June 08, 2013, 01:26:06 pm »
Frenard (Arnoldi) Duck N69966
This single-seat amphibian/flying boat was designed and built by Mr. Fred N. Arnoldi (hence Frenard) and several colleagues of the Curtiss-Wright company. The aircraft was intended as flying scale for a planned (unbuilt) 4-seat aircraft and it was completed in 1948/1949 and then powered by a 50hp Continental A50. Many year later (in the 1970s) the aircraft was advertised for sale as the Bohmer Canard and it had been re-engined with a 65hp Continental A65. The aircraft is still on the FAA register as the Frenard Experimental. The Duck was claimed to be easy to convert for land or water use and the wing floats and landing gear were removable.

Offline patvig

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #48 on: June 09, 2013, 01:59:32 am »
Edward Lanier "Paraplane".

http://www.1000aircraftphotos.com/PRPhotos/LanierParaplane1.htm

 The Lanier (father and son) were convinced they had invented the best thing since bread came in slice. In fact they just re-invented Handley Page flaps of 1919... in the 40's.
They were aparently inspired by... ice cream cones inherent stability.  :o
At least they build extremely-odd looking aircrafts that were detailed in Le Fana de l'Aviation 371 (year 2000).
The one below is one of the most "reasonable" designs they come by. Imagine the others.  ::)


In my database, I found 2 Paraplane models : http://phpmyadmin.apinc.org/index.php?db=gpatvig_avions&token=88c4005e982b5ccb90ef6540591694e4#PMAURL:db=gpatvig_avions&table=avion&target=tbl_select.php&token=88c4005e982b5ccb90ef6540591694e4
Patrice Vignaud
Larmor-Baden, France
www.vignaud.org    (planes database)

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #49 on: June 09, 2013, 03:36:55 am »
In my database, I found 2 Paraplane models : http://phpmyadmin.apinc.org/index.php?db=gpatvig_avions&token=88c4005e982b5ccb90ef6540591694e4#PMAURL:db=gpatvig_avions&table=avion&target=tbl_select.php&token=88c4005e982b5ccb90ef6540591694e4

Thanks for the info. Even with two prototypes built, I think an aircraft type can still apply for "one-off"...

The link you provided doesn't work as it requires prior identification. Please correct it if you can.

Offline patvig

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #50 on: June 09, 2013, 10:35:35 am »
In my database, I found 2 Paraplane models : http://phpmyadmin.apinc.org/index.php?db=gpatvig_avions&token=88c4005e982b5ccb90ef6540591694e4#PMAURL:db=gpatvig_avions&table=avion&target=tbl_select.php&token=88c4005e982b5ccb90ef6540591694e4

Thanks for the info. Even with two prototypes built, I think an aircraft type can still apply for "one-off"...

The link you provided doesn't work as it requires prior identification. Please correct it if you can.
Sorry for giving alink to the database tool. This is the link to my website selection page : http://www.vignaud.org/Gestion_BD/Recherche.php and enter "Lanier" in the "Marque" field (Marque means brand).
Patrice Vignaud
Larmor-Baden, France
www.vignaud.org    (planes database)

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #51 on: June 09, 2013, 04:19:24 pm »
Charles Pritchard of Emporia, Virginia, was a railroader by profession, which didn't keep him for having a go at aircraft making. And instead of playing it safe, he set out to build an all-aluminum wingless combined aircraft/car — no less! — which he said had been ten years in the making... and so was born the Rocket Air Ship.

The plane has short baffles or fins in place of wings, a 90 hp engine, a conventional propeller and tail assembly and a tricycle landing gear. It was 21 feet long, 98 inches wide and weighed 800 lbs. Pritchard made eight runs along runway, but — surprise, surprise — didn’t get off the ground...

More about that story:
http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1915&dat=19550608&id=zJArAAAAIBAJ&sjid=_nIFAAAAIBAJ&pg=1930,1315769
http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1298&dat=19550608&id=gQUUAAAAIBAJ&sjid=o4oDAAAAIBAJ&pg=7030,5159710
http://xplanes.tumblr.com/post/238382246/charles-pritchard-designer-builder-and-pilot
http://www.corbisimages.com/stock-photo/rights-managed/U1087329A/charles-pritchards-airplane


Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #52 on: June 10, 2013, 06:54:25 am »
Corcoran Model 65-1 (N7558U)
A light biplane sport aircraft with an all-metal construction. This original design had two 8hp West Bend single cylinder/2-stroke  engines on either side of the fuselage. The single-seat aircraft was a design of Mr. Stanley Corcoran and was built by the R.S.Corcoran company and first flew during 1966.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2013, 10:26:40 am by Stargazer2006 »

Offline Grey Havoc

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #53 on: June 11, 2013, 09:35:25 am »
The Fogle V333 Sky Cat tilt-rotor was built in 1982 but never been flown. It was designed and built by Hal Fogle, who also worked on the SR-71 Blackbird program.

Photos below depict the prototype (now on display at the Carolinas Aviation Museum) and the full-scale mockup that preceded it, at some airshow.

Supposedly it was intended as a 'low cost CAS' aircraft.
http://www.arrse.co.uk/aviation/43945-whats-any-plane-spotters-2026.html
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Offline gatoraptor

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #54 on: June 12, 2013, 06:51:21 pm »
I don't think anyone has yet mentioned the remarkable WeeBee, an airplane so small you don't get in it, you lay on top of it!

Offline blackkite

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #55 on: June 13, 2013, 04:04:31 am »
Hi!

Offline blackkite

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #56 on: June 13, 2013, 04:08:09 am »
And....

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #57 on: June 13, 2013, 10:21:18 am »
Hi gatoraptor  :) thanks for the nice picture of the WeeBee.
Hi blackkite  :) thanks for the videos (or should I say films?).
The picture of gatoraptor is interesting. How many of us knew that the WeeBee initially had a tail wheel gear. I assume it never flew in that form.  The original WeeBee had a Righter S-2-45 (military O-45) engine while the replica is quoted as having a Kiekhafer (according to aerofiles.com the Kiekhafer company later also built the Righter S-2-45).  The S-2-45 (O-45) was built in versions from 20hp to 40hp.
One site reports that there were 2 versions of the WeeBee. Does anyone know whether they mean version 1 (tail wheel), version 2 (tri-gear), or is version 1 the original and version 2 the replica?

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #58 on: June 13, 2013, 11:46:11 am »
Aero Wood Avocet 1A.
This 4-seat amphibian was a design of a company name Aero Wood Specialties, Inc. and work started around 1993. The aircraft had a largely all composite materials construction and the first example (a Model Avovet 1-A with a 300hp Lycoming IO-540-K1D5 engine) was under construction when the project was halted, possibly in/around 1998 and consequently the prototype was never completed. The general configuration was not unlike that of the Spencer Air Card (and other designs) with a pusher prop behind the cabin. I could not ascertain whether ever a N...number was assigned.
 

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #59 on: June 18, 2013, 04:38:16 am »
Bowling X-Wind (N6379).
The X[Wind was a one-of-a-kind homebuilt of Mr. Jack Bowling and it first flew in 1974. The aircraft had a 80hp Continental A80 engine and featured a corrugated aluminum fuselage and tail covering, not unlike that of early Junkers. The aircraft had wings taken from a Luscombe 8. The registration was canceled in 2012.

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #60 on: June 21, 2013, 10:37:24 am »
Flemming XNU-1
Although built in the Philippines, I trust it will qualify as the designer/builder was American Mr. Jim Flemming. The all-metal aircraft was described as a 7-seater(?) and was reportedly briefly tested during the late-1960s or early-1970s. The engine was reported as a 185hp Lycoming.

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #61 on: June 30, 2013, 09:26:32 am »
Barton B-1 Sylkie One (N711WB).
An advanced homebuilt two-seater by Mr. Wayne Barton and first flown on 2 May 1975. The aircraft had a fully retractable tri-gear and a 150hp Lycoming O-320 engine. The B-1 was initially built as personal transport for the designer, but later plans were made available for amateur construction and the type could accept engines in the 125-180hp range. No no additional aircraft were completed. The Sylkie One was winner of the 1979 EAA Outstanding New Design Award. 

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #62 on: July 03, 2013, 10:37:44 am »
Doyle ROG-1 Moon Maid (N12041)
The Moon Maid was one of USA`s first homebuilt aircraft to be powered by a VW engine. The aircraft was designed and built by Mr. Richard H. Doyle and started life as a gyrocopter (N1125). Mr. Doyle than decided to transform the gyrocopter to a low wing aircraft using the wings that had been manufactured by Mr. Phil Atlas for his (never built) homebuilt. The aircraft first took the air (now as N12041) in June 1964. The Moon Maid initially had a 25hp VW1200, later received a 50hp VW1600 and finally a 60hp VW1840.  During its career the aircraft was modified several times and amongst others received a dorsal fin, a slightly enlarged vertical tail and a new cantilever undercarriage with wheel pants.  Although plans were available for amateur construction (for engines in the 35-50hp range), no further aircraft were built.
Attached photo is from the B.C.F. Klein collection 


Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #63 on: July 11, 2013, 03:53:04 am »
Durand XD-85
This was a 2-seat pusher designed and built by Mr. William H. Durand and the aircraft first flew during the Summer of 1948. The all-metal XD-85 was powered by a 85hp Continental C85-12J engine. The aircraft reportedly sustained wing damage in a hangar incident and was not rebuilt. Further development was halted, a fate not uncommon to many other (light) aircraft projects of the immediate post-war years.


Anyone knows the registration of the XD-85?

Offline BillRo

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #64 on: July 11, 2013, 02:48:46 pm »
Cook CA-1 Challenger

John Cook was trained in England and emigrated to the US to work on aircraft when the UK industry imploded in the 60's. After stints at several companies including Helio, he went to work for Northrop. I met him at there on the 747 (Northrop designed and built the center and aft fuselage) and after work in the evenings and on weekends, several of us went down to Torrance and helped production design this plane in return for stock in the company. We built a prototype and a static test article, intending to obtain an FAA Type Certificate. The aircraft first flew in May 1969 and performed well; it passed static tests with very minor fixes. During a spin test, the FAA pilot kept the power on during the first turn of the  spin - we had always closed the throttle as it stalled - and the plane entered an unrecoverable spin mode. John and the FAA pilot parachuted to safety, but the plane N21CA fell into the LA Harbor. We built a second prototype, N72CA, and John Cook and John Parker test flew it to determine a safe aft CG limit. During one of these tests they got into the same situation and bailed out. JP was fine but Cook's parachute was hit by the spinning plane and he was killed.

The company continued for a while and a third prototype was completed (N123CA) and an attempt was made to market the project as a homebuilt. This was not successful, the company folded and the plane was sold.



Offline BillRo

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #65 on: July 11, 2013, 02:49:45 pm »
Cook Challenger 3-View

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #66 on: July 12, 2013, 05:39:44 pm »
Wow! Thanks a lot BillRo for this rare document on a type I didn't know... and of course thanks walter for keeping this topic alive!

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #67 on: July 16, 2013, 03:52:13 am »
Brenning B-Liner (N285TT)
Mr. Orin Z. Brenning started work on his B-Liner push/pull two-seater in 1970 and the aircraft was completed in 1986 with the first flight taking place on 31 July of that year. The aircraft featured a mixed wood, steel, composites construction and was purely intended for personal use, so no plans/kits were made available. The B-Liner was powered by two 85hp Continental C85-12 engines.
Some details: wingspan 34ft, length 23.667frt, height 8.254ft.
max. speed 158mph, cruise 144mph,  climb 1,400ft/minute, ceiling 13,000ft, range 420 miles
Photo courtesy Mr. Brenning


Offline patvig

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #68 on: July 16, 2013, 04:57:52 am »
Cook CA-1 Challenger

John Cook was trained in England and emigrated to the US to work on aircraft when the UK industry imploded in the 60's. After stints at several companies including Helio, he went to work for Northrop. I met him at there on the 747 (Northrop designed and built the center and aft fuselage) and after work in the evenings and on weekends, several of us went down to Torrance and helped production design this plane in return for stock in the company. We built a prototype and a static test article, intending to obtain an FAA Type Certificate. The aircraft first flew in May 1969 and performed well; it passed static tests with very minor fixes. During a spin test, the FAA pilot kept the power on during the first turn of the  spin - we had always closed the throttle as it stalled - and the plane entered an unrecoverable spin mode. John and the FAA pilot parachuted to safety, but the plane N21CA fell into the LA Harbor. We built a second prototype, N72CA, and John Cook and John Parker test flew it to determine a safe aft CG limit. During one of these tests they got into the same situation and bailed out. JP was fine but Cook's parachute was hit by the spinning plane and he was killed.

The company continued for a while and a third prototype was completed (N123CA) and an attempt was made to market the project as a homebuilt. This was not successful, the company folded and the plane was sold.
In my dababase I have a plane referenced JC-1, first flow at the same date, and 3 made too. Is it the same plane ?
Patrice Vignaud
Larmor-Baden, France
www.vignaud.org    (planes database)

Offline patvig

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #69 on: July 16, 2013, 05:04:57 am »
Doyle ROG-1 Moon Maid (N12041)
The Moon Maid was one of USA`s first homebuilt aircraft to be powered by a VW engine. The aircraft was designed and built by Mr. Richard H. Doyle and started life as a gyrocopter (N1125). Mr. Doyle than decided to transform the gyrocopter to a low wing aircraft using the wings that had been manufactured by Mr. Phil Atlas for his (never built) homebuilt. The aircraft first took the air (now as N12041) in June 1964. The Moon Maid initially had a 25hp VW1200, later received a 50hp VW1600 and finally a 60hp VW1840.  During its career the aircraft was modified several times and amongst others received a dorsal fin, a slightly enlarged vertical tail and a new cantilever undercarriage with wheel pants.  Although plans were available for amateur construction (for engines in the 35-50hp range), no further aircraft were built.
Attached photo is from the B.C.F. Klein collection
Under Doyle brand name (same builder ?), I have 2 more aircrafts referenced in my database :
  • Oriole, flew in 1939, no details
  • Vulcan, biplane 2 seater, no more details
Patrice Vignaud
Larmor-Baden, France
www.vignaud.org    (planes database)

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #70 on: July 16, 2013, 09:25:12 am »
Hi Patrice  :) 
I think that the designation JC-1 for the Cook Challenger is correct. You will notice that JC-1 is also used by the manufacturer (see caption under the the photo above). 

Offline BillRo

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #71 on: July 16, 2013, 10:22:12 am »
Sorry, my mistake. It should be the JC-1 for John Cook. When I get time I will post info on another interesting plane he designed, the JC-2 Challenger II racer.

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #72 on: July 19, 2013, 02:29:00 pm »
The all-yellow experimental Pitt Yellow Jacket [N5745N] was a single-seat sportsplane designed and built by the brothers Bruce and Gilbert Pitt of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
After the photograph was taken, "bullet" cowls were added to streamline the jutting four cylinders of the 85-h.p. Continental C-85-8 motor. The wingtips and tail assembly had chord-wise black stripes in imitation of the "Yellow Jacket"—an American type of wasp. The Yellow Jacket prototype clocked 150 m.p.h. and cruised comfortably at 130 m.p.h.
The balanced proportions of the overall design apparent in the picture belie the dimensions—span 14 ft. and length 19 ft.

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #73 on: July 24, 2013, 11:03:36 am »
Patterson IY67 Pipsqueek (N1256).
Mr. Elton L. Patterson was designer and builder of the unique single-seat Pipsqueek.  The aircraft had negative stagger, a retractable undercarriage and was powered by a 40hp VW1500 engine. The construction was started in 1963 and N1256 made the first flight on 26 February 1968.

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #74 on: August 10, 2013, 12:37:12 pm »
Hegy RCH-1 El Chuparoso (N9360)
This was a single-seat enclosed cabin biplane designed and built by Mr. Ray Hegy, who was famous for his wooden propellers. Work on the aircraft started in 1950 and was it completed in 1959, making the first flight on 1 May of that year. The aircraft had a 65hp Continental A65 engine and a mixed steel tube/wood construction. The aircraft was donated to the EAA (AirVenture) Museum.


Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #75 on: August 11, 2013, 07:02:04 am »
The aircraft was called Chuparosa (with an "a") as written in the filename, not Chuparoso as you wrote in the post.
Here is a couple more pictures.

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #76 on: August 21, 2013, 07:00:34 am »
Hoffman X-1 Sweet Patootie (N6313D)
Mr. Edward C. Hoffman, during the 1960/1970s, produced several original homebuilt designs and his
X-series included the X-1 and X-3 single-seat land planes. In addition Mr. Hoffman built several flying boats (X-2, X-4 abd X-5) and made maximum use of the Florida weather and available water areas.  Must have been a lot of fun!!
The X-1 was first flown on 24 February 1960 and initially fitted with a 65hp Continental A65 engine. The following year N6313D was re-engined with a 90hp Continental C90 and it also received some modifications such as a tear drop canopy.   

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #77 on: August 21, 2013, 07:04:50 am »
Hoffman X-3 The Girlfriend (N14647).
The X-3 was the second land plane of Mr. Edward C. Hoffman and first flew late-1974. At that time it was fitted with a 75hp Continental A65 engine.  The A75 was later replaced by a 85hp C85 for an improved overall performance. 

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #78 on: August 21, 2013, 10:31:15 am »
Thank you so much Walter for keeping this topic alive!!  ;D

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #79 on: September 03, 2013, 11:53:49 am »
Linn Mini Mustang (N10L)
The Mini Mustang was designed and built by Mr. Charles C. Linn and despite the small dimensions, the aircraft featured a retractable undercarriage. The Mini Mustang was built to approximately 45-50% scale of the P-51. The L-1 was the first example built by Mr. Linn and it first flew on 14 January 1962. It won the 1962 EAA Most Popular Aircvraft awarsd, but was lost in an acident. To replace the L-1, Mr. Linn then constructed a second example, the L-2 (also named Linns Mustang) with the same N10L registration. This second aircraft differed slightly in having a 4-bladed (instead of 3-bladed) propeller, larger tail surfaces, a smaller engine air intake, longer canopy and it was also a bit shorter with 13.5ft (against 13.833ft). Both aircraft were powered by a 125hp Lycoming O-290-G engine. Plans were markleted for amateur construction, but I never could establish whether additional aircraft were built (maybe 2?)           

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #80 on: September 03, 2013, 12:03:09 pm »
Kraft Super-Fli (N5PK)
This high performance and fully aerobatic light plane was designed and built by Mr. Philip Kraft, with assistance by Mr. Paul White and it first flew in December 1974 under the power of a 200hp Lycoming AIO-360-A1D engine. The K-1 Super-Fli was a scaled-up version of a model airplane that Mr. Kraft had built earlier (he was a former world champion model aircraft builder). Although the K-1 was made available for amateur construction, no addition aircraft were completed. It is possible that a later owner (Mr. Ian Paden) installed a more powerful IO-540 engine. The N5PK registration for the aircraft was canceled in March 1990. 

Offline burunduk

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #81 on: November 15, 2013, 01:10:02 pm »
Completely forgotten was this Bolton 1-B.

Stargazer2006, could you tell some info about this aircraft?
I'm very surpirsed by it's number N33B, course according to
http://www.airport-data.com/aircraft/N33B.html

the number was applied in 1946 to Piper PA-12.

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #82 on: November 15, 2013, 02:03:23 pm »
Stargazer2006, could you tell some info about this aircraft?
I'm very surpirsed by it's number N33B

So was I when I came across the two photos in my dad's aviation files, with a big question mark at the top...
The aircraft was eventually identified by one of my contacts (who it was escapes me at the moment) but someone sent me a PM a few months ago that gave me the exact identity of the aircraft. It seems likely that the aircraft was quickly deregistered (maybe it crashed?) so that it doesn't appear in most records. But don't forget, the airport-data website and the similar ones are not exhaustive. On several occasions I found they only got the last couple of allocations for one given registration when I could trace another one before them.

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #83 on: December 28, 2013, 08:37:12 am »
Former test pilot János Kocsis now lives in Hungary, but he's still got some nice little stories from his years at Mojave.

After mentioning a very strange aircraft prototype in a Facebook discussion, he got me really curious... Now he's finally managed to find a thumbnail-sized picture of a the 1983 "Flying Hangar Door". According to János, it was home-designed and home-made by a very quiet and talented NASA engineer from Dryden Flight Research Center and weighed as much as a Vespa moped. The all-wing airframe was made of corrugated paper and the wheels were from child's bicycles (plastic rims). It was powered by a lawnmower engine.

Despite its seemingly bulky shape, János remembers the "Flying Hangar Door" as being an "excellent flyer". It is possible that the aircraft never received a proper designation or even a registration.

I have enlarged the thumbnail picture a bit but as you can see, it's really not that good. Any other info and/or pic about this strange contraption and its designer/builder would be greatly appreciated!!!

Offline robunos

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #84 on: December 28, 2013, 03:05:50 pm »
Reminds me of the Sawyer Skyjacker...

cheers,
            Robin.
Where ARE the Daleks when you need them......

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #85 on: December 28, 2013, 03:35:11 pm »
Reminds me of the Sawyer Skyjacker...

It does, actually! But this would be like a toy version of it, given its size and construction...

Offline Cy-27

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #86 on: March 18, 2015, 12:37:16 am »
Young Eddyo F-2
 
Designed by FAA employee Edward Young of Erie, Colorada, USA, the Young Eddyo F-2 was a distinctive two-seat side-by-side light aircraft and took three years of spare-time activity to complete at a cost of $2,500. The sole aircraft, registered N55566V, first flew on November 4, 1963. The aircraft registration was finally cancelled on 12 December 1983. The Eddyo F-2 was a sesquiplane and had Vee-braced upper wings, which carryied the ailerons, and cantilever lower stubwings which contained the fuel tanks It had full span trailing-edge flaps. Construction was conventional, with wooden wings and a steel-tube fuselage and tail unit, all fabric-covered. The design featured tail-wheel  landing gear which utilised cantilever spring steel main legs. The engine was a Lycoming O-290-D2 four-cylinder 135 hp horizontally-opposed air-cooled which drove a two-blade fixed-pitch propeller.

Details

Accommodation: 2 seats
Powerplant: Lycoming O-290-D2 four-cylinder (135 hp)
Wing span (upper): 23 ft 1 in (7.04 m)
Constant chord: 3 ft 10 in (1.17 m)
Length: 19 ft 5 in (5.92 in)
Height: 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Empty weight: 997 lb (452 kg)
Maximum take-off weight: 1,525 lb (692 kg)
Maximum level speed at sea level at MTOW: 145 mph (233 km/h)
Cruising speed: 130 mph (209 km/h)
Landing speed: 70 mph (ll3 km/h)
Service ceiling: 8,000 ft (550 m)
Range with maximum fuel: 425 miles (685 km)
 
Sources:
Janes All The Worlds Aircraft 1965-66 [Janes] edited by J.W.R. Taylor
FAA database

Offline Skyblazer

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #87 on: March 18, 2015, 05:35:44 am »
Thanks for this, Cy-27! I wish there could be more contributions to this topic...

Offline hesham

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #88 on: November 23, 2016, 04:48:26 am »
Hi,

Mr. Al Backstrom was American,and he designed a series of tailless gliders,started with
EPB-1A Flying Plank,followed by the EPB-1C Flying Plank,later developed into EPB-1 HR
Super Plank.

He also built a motor glider light aircraft called WPB-1 Powered Plank in early 1970s.

https://www.j2mcl-planeurs.net/dbj2mcl/planeurs-machines/planeurs-liste_0int.php

Offline Motocar

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #89 on: November 24, 2016, 02:53:20 am »
Fascinating post ...! So many interesting concepts, projects and work to create those beautiful machines, that previously only lived in the active minds of its creators.
Greetings des Maracay, Venezuela

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Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #91 on: June 19, 2017, 08:39:10 am »
Hi Hesham  :D
This is the Model C Speedbird (N38C or NX38C) by Merle Larson of Oakland, Ca. The tiny wing (wingspan 12ft) was designed to work within the slipstream of the propeller and featured very large flaps for lift.
AFAIK the aircraft really flew, but on that first flight  on 7 December 1953 the engine stopped and the aircraft stalled which seems no surprise with such a small wing.  Luckily Mr. Larson thankfully escaped serious injury and later designed the (Larson-Holmes) D-1 Duster.
The Speedbird aircraft was modified from a Taylorcraft BC-12.
 
 

Offline Motocar

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #92 on: June 19, 2017, 08:41:55 am »
Biggest set of interesting projects and their short stories ...!

Offline hesham

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #93 on: June 19, 2017, 08:59:24 am »
Thank you my dear Walter.

Offline snark

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #94 on: June 19, 2017, 05:57:32 pm »
Gazda Helicospeeder

The Gazda Model 100 Helicospeeder was an all-aluminum single-seat helicopter developed by Antoine Gazda of Wakefield, Rhode Island in 1947. It was powered by a Continental A-75 engine. One example was completed and test-flown, achieving a speed of 100 mph.

Apparently, the helicospeeder is now preserved at the Hiller Aviation Museum, San Carlos, CA
« Last Edit: June 22, 2017, 11:41:18 am by snark »

Offline hesham

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #95 on: June 20, 2017, 06:09:31 am »
Thank you Snark,

and here is all Info about Gazda and his Projects;

http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,19852.msg192430.html#msg192430

Offline VictorXL188

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #96 on: June 20, 2017, 03:11:38 pm »
Here is the Option Air Acapella 100L [N360 CB]. It crashed on July 28, 1982.

Going back to the first type that Skyblazer posted back on this thread, in the dim and distant past, members may be aware that a second example was built of the Acapella, and this airframe is now on display at the EAA Museum at Oshkosh, and the full details can be seen on the 1000 photos site; http://1000aircraftphotos.com/Contributions/VanTilborg/10103.htm

Offline riggerrob

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #97 on: June 21, 2017, 08:38:50 pm »
Svardala Bullet was a 2-seater flying boat similar to Volmer Jensen's Sportsman.
Designer/builder John Svardala immigrated to Canada after World War 2. He settled in Wellandport, Ontario and flew for fun. In 1946, Svardala imported an X-1 airplane. I have no additional design details, but it flew at Hawkesbury, Ontario during the 1979s.
Before September 1964, Svardala built the prototype Svardala Bullet, 2-seater, side-by-side, flying-boat. The (plywood) hull, landing gear, (fabric-covered) wings, (fabric-covered) empennage and tip floats were similar to contemporary Volmer Sportsman and Anderson Kingfisher. The greatest difference was in in the aft cabin, which vaguely resembled a Republic Seabee. The most striking different was the short pylon supporting the engine (Continental or Lycoming) and propeller. Because the crankshaft was only a short distance above the (flat) aft fuselage, Svardala installed a 2-bladed, wooden propeller with broad, curved blades.
The Svardala Bullet was sold during the early 1970s and moved to Sherbrooke, Quebec. The new owner complained about poor climb performance. He installed a blown Plexiglas windshield, taller engine pylon and larger diameter propeller. I never saw the Bullet fly from Sherbrooke Airport. I have one photo of the yellow Svardala Bullet prototype.

Offline walter

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #98 on: June 22, 2017, 12:03:45 am »
Hi riggertob :D
This is the only picture I ever saw of the Bullet. Any chance of you posting the yellow prototype?
Funny that apparently several registrations (most non-official) were tied to the Bullet. Can anyone confirm which was the correct registration (choose from: CF-PUY, CF-SYF, CF-PUH, CF-PHU, the latter possibly being the X-1 mentioned). 

Offline riggerrob

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #99 on: June 22, 2017, 11:06:42 am »
My photo is from the same angle as yours, but shows the higher engine pylon.

Offline VictorXL188

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #100 on: June 25, 2017, 09:18:53 am »
Hopefully my search criteria was correct and this is a new addition to the list of one-off US types. The Ryson ST-100 Cloudster was an attempt, in the 1970s, to slow down the import of European-manufactured powered sailplanes into the US at a time where soaring was beginning to gain popularity. The ST-100 was as the result of the collaboration of T Claude Ryan and his son (hence the Ryson) and differed from its European counterparts in the use of an all metal construction, unlike the European designs of powered sailplanes from Fournier etc, which used mainly a combination of wood, metal and fabric covered structures. Attached picture comes from the San Diego Museum archive, whilst the GA drawing is from Air International June 1977 edition.

Offline VictorXL188

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #101 on: June 25, 2017, 11:57:47 am »
Not sure if this goes under this subject matter, so apologies and Forum organisers please feel free to move it. Anyway, was looking through the January 1977 issue of Air International and came across a project which was being planned by Bill Lear. It was known as the Allegro and was a 10-seat business aircraft, the specifications can be seen in the attached clipping.

Offline hesham

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #102 on: July 27, 2017, 11:00:21 am »
From JAWA 1963,Mr. Lawhorn and his Project LA-3.

Offline hesham

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #103 on: July 28, 2017, 05:13:49 am »
From JAWA 1973,the VertaK S-220.

Offline Mark Nankivil

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #104 on: November 22, 2017, 06:05:20 pm »
Good Day All -

NASA ID: A-26189
1 February 1960

Vanguard 2C vertical take-off and landing aircraft, wind tunnel test. Front view from below, model 14-˝ feet high, disk off. NASA Ames engineer Ralph Maki in photo. Variable height struts and ground plane, low pressure ratio, fan in wing. (NASA photo)

A much larger, high-res version can be viewed or downloaded here:
https://images-assets.nasa.gov/image/A-26189/A-26189~orig.jpg

Enjoy the Day! Mark

Offline hesham

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #105 on: February 07, 2019, 12:22:49 pm »
Hi,

here is a two Projects for Strickland Aircraft Corporation,for 4/5 seat and 12/14 seat,the strange in the aircraft is it had a twin engined buried in the wing and drive tractor airscrews ?.

From JAWA 1947.

Offline Dynoman

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #106 on: February 07, 2019, 12:44:52 pm »
Strickland Aircraft Corporation is listed as a manufacturing concern in Topeka, Kansas in 1943. It may have moved to North Caroline during or after the war. It is listed among companies who sought federal financial assistance between 1942 and 1943 (i.e. $98,770). In 1943 Strickland was working on a project called the Strickland Invader. IDK what type of aircraft (if it was an aircraft) the Strickland Invader was. It is listed among copyrighted Works of Art for 1943.
« Last Edit: February 07, 2019, 12:52:12 pm by Dynoman »

Offline hesham

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #107 on: February 07, 2019, 12:47:48 pm »
Strickland Aircraft Corporation is listed as a manufacturing concern in Topeka, Kansas in 1943. It may have moved to North Caroline during or after the war.

Thank you my dear Dynoman,and do you have a drawing to its design ?.

Offline Dynoman

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Re: All those weird and wonderful postwar U.S. one-offs...
« Reply #108 on: February 07, 2019, 01:15:28 pm »
Hesham,

No I don't have a picture of the aircraft. According to the copyright, there may exist a piece of conceptual art out there, which the company may have used in an advertisement or brochure. I'll keep looking though.