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Author Topic: JMR (Joint Multi-Role) & FVL (Future Vertical Lift) Programs  (Read 301151 times)

Offline Grey Havoc

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Re: JMR (Joint Multi-Role) & FVL (Future Vertical Lift) Programs
« Reply #30 on: August 20, 2012, 06:58:35 am »
The sole imperative of a government, once instituted, is to survive.

Offline Triton

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Re: JMR (Joint Multi-Role) & FVL (Future Vertical Lift) Programs
« Reply #31 on: August 21, 2012, 12:23:00 pm »
JMR Tech Demo Targets Leap in Rotorcraft Capability (Aviation Week/Ares blog)

Artist's impression of Bell-Boeing JMR concept.

Artist's impression of Boeing JMR concept.

Artist's impression of Sikorsky JMR concept.
« Last Edit: August 21, 2012, 05:18:46 pm by Triton »

Offline Triton

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Offline yasotay

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Re: JMR (Joint Multi-Role) & FVL (Future Vertical Lift) Programs
« Reply #33 on: November 11, 2012, 07:21:43 am »
DoD reveals FVL thinking

06 November 2012 - 15:14 by Tony Skinner in London



The US Department of Defense (DoD) has revealed more of its thinking about its next generation rotorcraft, following an industry conference on 1 November.

At Fort Magruder in Williamsburg, Virginia, attendees were briefed on the first two phases of the Joint Multi-Role (JMR) Technology Demonstrator (TD), which will eventually lead to a formal Future Vertical Lift (FVL) programme of record. The FVL aircraft will replace the majority of DoD rotorcraft sometime from 2034.

According to briefing slides released on 5 November, the Phase 1 of the JMR TD programme – now in its third year – will include the design, fabrication, and test of two air vehicle demonstrators, with contract awards expected to be made in FY13.

Alongside this effort, Phase 2 will concentrate on the ‘concepts, tools and processes’ to develop the required mission systems architecture – although it is too early to design the actual mission equipment package (MEP) for FVL. Phase 2 will concentrate on the attack mission as the most ‘stressing’ for mission systems development.

Six companies have been awarded Missions Systems Effectiveness Trades and Analysis (MS ETA) contracts to help define the scope of work undertaken under Phase 2. These included: Boeing, looking at mission scenarios/interoperable communications analysis; Honeywell Aerospace, carrying out a sensor fusion study; Lockheed Martin for a range of efforts, including cockpit HMI, MEP and weapons studies; Rockwell Collins, for a mission systems architectural study; Sikorsky, for a survivability optimisation analysis; and Survice Engineering for lethality and survivability systems analysis tools.

It was also confirmed that the FVL is unlikely to be a conventional helicopter design. Ned Chase, JMR TD programme manager at the US Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center, revealed that ‘operations analysis’ had found that compound helicopter and tiltrotor aircraft were more effective than the conventional helicopter across ‘all of the aviation missions studied’.

Chase noted that the higher speeds achieved by such rotorcraft were most valuable in medevac, air assault/movement and close combat attack missions.

‘The ability to operate army aircraft over a broader altitude range presents opportunities to widen the possibilities for executing aviation missions,’ Chase stated.

Programme managers had considered demonstrating Phase 2 mission systems components on the Phase 1 air vehicles but cost and risk considerations meant they will now be kept as independent efforts.

A draft solicitation for Phase 1 is expected to be issued at the start of December, with a formal BAA release at the start of January. Proposals will be due within 63 days followed by multiple initial contract awards in mid-September.

An indication of the JMR Model Performance Specification (MPS) was also given, which is currently on its fifth iteration. While the current MPS does not define the performance of the final FVL aircraft, the DoD is currently looking at a rotorcraft suitable for a range of missions (ASW, ASuW, VERTREP, SAR, medevac, special ops), which has utility/attack commonality.

The utility variant will be required to carry 12 troops over a 424 km radius, have a 30 minute loiter capability, and provide ballistic protection and crashworthy attributes. The cabin height must be at least 1.67m and the FVL will either be self-deployable or transportable in a C-17.        

Offline Triton

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Offline Triton

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Re: JMR (Joint Multi-Role) & FVL (Future Vertical Lift) Programs
« Reply #35 on: December 18, 2012, 10:25:56 am »
"Army Targets High Speed For Rotorcraft Demo"
by Graham Warwick
Aviation Week & Space Technology
December 03, 2012

Source:
http://www.aviationweek.com/Article.aspx?id=%2Farticle-xml%2FAW_12_03_2012_p26-522523.xml&p=1

Quote
As it draws up requirements for an advanced rotorcraft to replace its Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawks after 2030, the U.S. Army wants to demonstrate configurations capable of speeds up to 230 kt.—50% faster than today's helicopters.

The Army's initial requirements for the Future Vertical Lift (FVL) Medium utility rotorcraft call for speed in excess of 170 kt.—still faster than current helicopters. But its Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) plans to focus the upcoming Joint Multi-Role (JMR) technology demonstration (TD) on the 230-kt. target.

The FVL Medium model performance specification (MPS) now being finalized with inputs from government and industry configuration trade studies “reflects what we think would describe the aircraft if we snapped a line today,” says Ned Chase, AATD's JMR TD program manager. “It's a reasonable place to start.”

The “singular difference” between the model performance specification and AATD's science and technology (S&T) plan is speed, says Chase. That is because the Army has already invested heavily in conventional helicopter technology. The JMR TD program is an opportunity to balance the portfolio by investing in high-speed rotorcraft so a wider range of options will be available when FVL Medium begins around 2020.

“We have an MPS to provide an overarching description of the next-gen aircraft. It is intended to reflect the thinking of the requirements community across the Defense Dept., and their view is still 170-kt.-plus,” says Chase. “[But] we want 230 kt.”

Configuration studies by AVX Aircraft, Bell Boeing, Boeing and Sikorsky, as well as a government team, will be completed in the next 2-3 months. But results so far suggest only a compound helicopter or tiltrotor can meet the FVL Medium requirements. The analyses point to a 30,000-lb. gross-weight aircraft, down from the original 40,000-lb. estimate, but heavier than today's Black Hawk at 22,000 lb.

Under Phase 1 of the JMR TD, AATD plans to issue a broad agency announcement in early January calling for proposals to build demonstrator aircraft to fly in 2017. “We expect a compound or tiltrotor, but there may be others,” says Chase. AATD has funds for two demonstrators.

Offline yasotay

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Re: JMR (Joint Multi-Role) & FVL (Future Vertical Lift) Programs
« Reply #36 on: January 21, 2013, 07:52:06 am »
Boeing Teams with Sikorsky on JMR program
http://www.shephardmedia.com/news/rotorhub/sikorsky-boeing-team-us-armys-jmr-td/
Nice way to hedge your bet.  As Boeing is also teamed with Bell on Tilt-Rotor there is a good chance now that Boeing will be involved in the Joint Multi-Roll effort regardless of who wins.
As the only potential game in town in the US, it will be interesting to watch the coalesence of the teams in the next few years.  Assuming the program survives the budget.
 

Offline Nils_D

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Re: JMR (Joint Multi-Role) & FVL (Future Vertical Lift) Programs
« Reply #37 on: January 23, 2013, 05:01:00 am »
That last concept interestingly looks a lot like the swiveling tailrotor which was tried on the S-61F and intended for the S-66.

Offline Jemiba

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Re: JMR (Joint Multi-Role) & FVL (Future Vertical Lift) Programs
« Reply #38 on: January 23, 2013, 12:13:19 pm »
If you are talking aboutthe picture in #36, I'd rather think, it's just a pusher prop, like the
one intended for the Kamov Ka-92 ( http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,2766.30.html )
It takes a long time, before all mistakes are made ...

Online AeroFranz

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Re: JMR (Joint Multi-Role) & FVL (Future Vertical Lift) Programs
« Reply #39 on: January 23, 2013, 01:27:59 pm »
I tend to concur with the assertion the tail prop is swiveling. Unless the single, main rotor is tip driven, there is no other way to counter torque in hover. The kamov has co-ax rotors which can deal with that. Anyway, anyone remember why the swiveling arrangement (called 'rotoprop' or 'rotaprop') was not pursued? I guess the AH-56 Cheyenne did the same thing but with two separate fixed rotors.
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Offline yasotay

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Re: JMR (Joint Multi-Role) & FVL (Future Vertical Lift) Programs
« Reply #40 on: January 23, 2013, 06:40:00 pm »
swiveling.

Offline Nils_D

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Re: JMR (Joint Multi-Role) & FVL (Future Vertical Lift) Programs
« Reply #41 on: January 24, 2013, 06:04:00 am »
I wonder if we will eventually see something like the S-66 / AH-56 replace the Apache around 2030-ish.

Offline Triton

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Re: JMR (Joint Multi-Role) & FVL (Future Vertical Lift) Programs
« Reply #42 on: February 28, 2013, 12:28:25 pm »
Artist's impression of Sikorsky/Boeing Joint Multi-Role (JMR) technology demonstrator based on Sikorsky's X2 technology:

Quote
Sikorsky and Boeing plan to submit a joint proposal to a develop and build a new prototype helicopter based on Sikorsky's X-2 high speed rotorcraft design for the US Army's Joint Multi-Role (JMR) technology demonstrator (TD) phase 1 programme.

"By leveraging our proven design, we can offer the Army reduced risk, a 100-knot (185 km/h) improvement in speed, a 60% improvement in combat radius, and 50% better high-hot hover performance," says Samir Mehta, president of Sikorsky's military aircraft division.

Mehta says the joint proposal will use the X-2's counter-rotating coaxial main rotors, pusher propeller, and advanced fly-by-wire system. The aircraft will efficiently cruise at 230 knots (426 km/h), and have improved hover efficiency, Mehta says.


Source:
http://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/sikorsky-and-boeing-to-pitch-x-2-based-design-for-us-army-jmr-td-effort-382897/

[Image Removed: Larger image of Sikorsky artist's impression later in this topic.]
« Last Edit: March 04, 2013, 12:17:47 pm by Triton »

Offline Triton

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Re: JMR (Joint Multi-Role) & FVL (Future Vertical Lift) Programs
« Reply #43 on: February 28, 2013, 12:35:39 pm »
Quote
The coaxial-rotor, pusher-propeller X2 configuration was picked to meet the Army Aviation Applied Technology Directorate's (AATD) requirement for a cruise speed of up to 230kt - at least 50% faster than a conventional helicopter. Sikorsky's company-funded X2 Technology demonstrator exceeded 260kt is September 2010 and two industry-funded S-97 Raider light tactical helicopter prototypes now being built are designed to cruise at 235kt clean and 220kt with weapons. The first Raider will fly in 2014.

Boeing and Sikorsky say the X2 configuration was also chosen for its coaxial-rotor hover efficiency. Before teaming in January, the two companies independently studied advanced conventional and compound helicopters and tiltrotors. After teaming, they jointly conducted another "analysis of alternatives" using their separate studies as the baseline. This resulted in selection of the X2 configuration.

AATD plans to award cost-sharing contracts for two competitive air-vehicle demonstrators to fly in 2017. JMR is a precursor to the planned FLV Medium utility program to field a replacement for the Army's UH-60 Black Hawks beginning in 2035. An X2-configuration FVL Medium would cruise at 230kt, a 100kt improvement over the UH-60M, have higher hover efficiency, 60% longer combat radius and 50% better hot-and-high performance, says the team.


Source:
http://www.aviationweek.com/Blogs.aspx?plckBlogId=Blog:27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7&plckPostId=Blog%3A27ec4a53-dcc8-42d0-bd3a-01329aef79a7Post%3A43e82fd7-8611-43a1-8517-9daf08468732

Offline Deino

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« Last Edit: March 02, 2013, 01:36:05 am by Deino »
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