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Author Topic: RB.106, RB.122 and RB.128 and Zeus turbojets  (Read 9360 times)

Offline Harrier

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Re: RB.106, RB.122 and RB.128 and Zeus turbojets
« Reply #15 on: January 06, 2018, 08:24:33 am »
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/1427535/Aubrey-Jones.html

Jones supported a different form of rationalisation, with firms having a more diverse base as with Hawker Siddeley taking over Brush. He recognised it was not competetive against the US. Fewer projects were needed but still from private firms who competed.

Sandys and Amery still believed the UK could take on the US, with European collaboration if needed. Concorde, VC10, Trident resulted.

Jones' section outlining his views is the most modern sounding part of the Plowden report.
« Last Edit: January 06, 2018, 08:55:52 am by Harrier »
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Offline rinkol

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Re: RB.106, RB.122 and RB.128 and Zeus turbojets
« Reply #16 on: January 06, 2018, 11:04:44 am »
There seems to be several common threads in the decline of the British aircraft industry

1. Too many players competing for a limited market. This goes back to the pre-war period. One of the things that always mystified me was how Napier was able to continue in the aero engine business through the 1930s - the Dagger had to be more trouble than it was worth. I would agree that there were too many projects for supersonic engines and that it would have been better to put more attention on engines that could be used for commercial aviation.

2. Hide bound business management . Outstanding people such as Roy Fedden, Frank Whittle and Stewqrt Tresilian were hamstrung by inept business leaders (who often owed their positions to family connections) and ended up being pushed out.

3. Faulty planning. Surely someone in a position of authority must have realized that the big flying boats had limited prospects in the post-war environment.

I would note that these sorts of things were not unique to the UK, but the UK was not in a position to afford them.

Offline JFC Fuller

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Re: RB.106, RB.122 and RB.128 and Zeus turbojets
« Reply #17 on: January 06, 2018, 11:28:14 am »
And Sandys was, at a base level, absolutely correct. UK industry was weak because it was fragmented but the skills and technology were there. Its a shame about come investment decisions though.

Offline kitnut617

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Re: RB.106, RB.122 and RB.128 and Zeus turbojets
« Reply #18 on: January 06, 2018, 12:41:33 pm »
One of the things that always mystified me was how Napier was able to continue in the aero engine business through the 1930s - the Dagger had to be more trouble than it was worth.
I would note that these sorts of things were not unique to the UK, but the UK was not in a position to afford them.

It caught up with them during the war with the Sabre resulting in English Electric buying them out.
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