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Author Topic: RADAR MAN - A Personal History of Stealth by Edward Lovick, Jr.  (Read 10017 times)

Offline seruriermarshal

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Re: RADAR MAN - A Personal History of Stealth by Edward Lovick, Jr.
« Reply #15 on: April 30, 2011, 12:53:33 am »
...was an elongated triangle, like a Toblerone chocolate candy box, or the triangular boxes that some posters are shipped in. You can see what I call the ‘triangular cylinder’ end-on in the center of the patch; it is the gray triangle.

Thanks for that. FWIW, I believe the term you are searching for is "prism," for your triangular cylinder.

I don't think so. A prism is merely a transparent pyramid with four sides. The author here is talking about a long box with three sides and flat triangular ends.

Like Sea Shadow

Offline PaulMM (Overscan)

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Re: RADAR MAN - A Personal History of Stealth by Edward Lovick, Jr.
« Reply #16 on: April 30, 2011, 01:03:03 am »
...was an elongated triangle, like a Toblerone chocolate candy box, or the triangular boxes that some posters are shipped in. You can see what I call the ‘triangular cylinder’ end-on in the center of the patch; it is the gray triangle.

Thanks for that. FWIW, I believe the term you are searching for is "prism," for your triangular cylinder.

I don't think so. A prism is merely a transparent pyramid with four sides. The author here is talking about a long box with three sides and flat triangular ends.

Not so, in English standard usage.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prism_(optics)

Quote
The traditional geometrical shape is that of a triangular prism with a triangular base and rectangular sides, and in colloquial use "prism" usually refers to this type.
"They can't see our arses for dust."
 
- Sir Sydney Camm

Offline bipa

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Re: RADAR MAN - A Personal History of Stealth by Edward Lovick, Jr.
« Reply #17 on: April 30, 2011, 04:35:37 am »
Quote
In 1958, I supervised a series of studies to see how the size and shape of objects, and the length of radar waves, interacted to produce radar signatures. I had to design a new test chamber with a low radar signature so that we would to be able to perform these measurements. One of the object shapes I tested was an elongated triangle, like a Toblerone chocolate candy box, or the triangular boxes that some posters are shipped in. You can see what I call the ‘triangular cylinder’ end-on in the center of the patch; it is the gray triangle.

We bounced radar waves of various wavelengths off of the long sides of the cylinder as the cylinder was rotated. When the radar wavelength was only about 1/25th the length of the triangle’s side, we produced the radar signature shown in red on the patch. The radar signature was very low most of the time, spiking to a maximum when broadside to the triangular cylinder faces, and falling quickly to the lows as the cylinder turned. Longer radar wavelengths produced wider broadside spikes and higher off-normal returns, resulting in higher radar cross sections.

Using the very data represented on the patch, I told Kelly Johnson in 1959 during the Arrow series design process leading to the A-12 Oxcart, and Dick Scherrer in 1974 during the conceptual design of Have Blue, predecessor of the F-117 Nighthawk, that the secret to low radar signature aircraft was to shape them to have nearly flat surfaces that would be as much as twenty-five times larger than the enemy radar’s wavelength. This design guideline also was incorporated into Lockheed’s stealthy ship, the Sea Shadow, which was launched into radar signature testing at sea in 1985
.

Rather basic experiment. Sounds a little simplistic a design guideline... even for a 1958 finding, let alone a 1985 design.
For example if you check that 1959 article (posted by Overscan a while ago)
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,2575.0
you'll see that RCS of various shapes was already quite well understood at that time.

Probably the author has been involved in deeper r&d but is not allowed to tell much.

Offline 500 Fan

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Re: RADAR MAN - A Personal History of Stealth by Edward Lovick, Jr.
« Reply #18 on: June 30, 2011, 03:07:11 pm »
If it is OK to ask of those who have read the book, is there any reference made to the Hughes/MD 500 or OH-6 in the section relating to helicopters? If there is, I think I'll have to get a copy. Thanks.


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Offline quellish

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Re: RADAR MAN - A Personal History of Stealth by Edward Lovick, Jr.
« Reply #19 on: June 30, 2011, 05:26:36 pm »
If it is OK to ask of those who have read the book, is there any reference made to the Hughes/MD 500 or OH-6 in the section relating to helicopters? If there is, I think I'll have to get a copy. Thanks.


500 Fan.

The helicopter information is about 1.5-2 pages, and while very illuminating, does not mention the Hughes 500 specifically. It talks about finding a way to get an even number of blades to cancel each other's return, reducing the signature of a rotorcraft. This was in the mid-80s according to Lovick.

Offline 500 Fan

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Re: RADAR MAN - A Personal History of Stealth by Edward Lovick, Jr.
« Reply #20 on: July 01, 2011, 06:32:49 am »
Quellish, thanks for the reply.
 
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Offline Have Blue

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Re: RADAR MAN - A Personal History of Stealth by Edward Lovick, Jr.
« Reply #21 on: July 15, 2018, 12:01:30 pm »
One particular section of the book caught my interest - The Bornholm Incident (page 76 in my copy).  Lovick gives an account (told to him by Elvin O. Richter) of a mysterious fog that appeared to have been created by Soviet aircraft off the coast of Bornholm in the mid-1950s.  The fog seemed to attenuate electromagnetic radiation, thus blocking the radar station on Bornholm from picking up any radar echoes from western europe (not to mention blocking radio communication).

Lovick puts forward a few theories on what the 'fog' could have been (and also mentions that it may be what later became known as the "Marburg effect", but google searches on that term simply circle back to Lovick's book), but ends that brief section with:

I am not aware of any attempt to investigate these reports.  They may have been considered to be deliberate "disinformation" - it was the Cold War era.  They were interesting, nevertheless.

I haven't been able to find any information on this 'incident', but it seems like a radar absorbing smokescreen would be a highly desirable tactical capability.  Given that this account is well over 50 years old, was it in fact disinformation, or was such a 'fog' indeed developed?