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Westland Wyvern - Development and Projects

Longshaor

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Hi all,

I'm looking for a drawing (preferably 3-view) of Westland's original Wyvern design with the Rolls Royce Eagle engine. Thanks!
 

GTX

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I can only provide a side view I'm afraid, but I'll throw in a photo of the real aircraft as a bonus :D:




Regards,

Greg
 

smurf

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There are detailed multiviews (6 way I think) and lots of pictures in
Westland Wyvern 4_016 Mark 1 publications mark1@cmail.cz
 

smurf

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Sorry - a rather important typo

This series is 4+ publications. the Wyvern being number 016
 

toura

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Hi Hasan
From british secret bombers an figthers 1939/45
 

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hesham

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Thank you my dear Toura.
 

Jemiba

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By courtesy of lark, I got an article from Flypast about the heritage of Stanley Seager, working for
Westland in the years of 1917 to 1969, as a designer after his years of apprenticeship. Besides
other stuff, there were two handmade sketches of trainer variants of the Westland Wyvern torpedo
fighter. Not much seems to be known about them, so I just tried to sketch them as 3-views.
The first is a layout for Westlands response to the T12/48 specification, that later emerged as the
T.3. Obviously it had a 2-men cockpit with tandem seating, but with a completely new canopy,
whereas in the T.3 two standard canopies were used, connected by a perspex tunnel, maybe just
as a cheaper and quicker solution. The additional fins are absent, maybe an indication, that this
design was made, when the need for them still wasn't apparent.
The other sketch shows a trainer with a wider canopy, so probably featuring side-by-side seating,
as generally preffered by the Britsh during that time. Although still using contra props, the engine
and its cowling are slimmer, suggesting a lighter, less powerful engine, than the Armstrong Siddeley
Python of the S.4/T.3 . No fins here, too, but the central fin/rudder looks bigger. Maybe this was a
proposal to field a Wyvern derivative as as contender to turboprop trainers like the Avro Athena.
Strange detail, that both proposals seem to carry the full armament of four guns.
(I split and moved the posts about the Wyvern from the thread in the Early Projects section, as
the Wyvern, although answering a wartime specification, came to its own not before the war had
ended)
 

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pathology_doc

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Jemiba said:
(I split and moved the posts about the Wyvern from the thread in the Early Projects section, as the Wyvern, although answering
a wartime specification, came to its own not before the war had ended)

It can be difficult to know what to do about these. e.g. Tony Buttler put the B-36 into the postwar American Bombers book despite it beginning its development in WW2 because, to use his words, it shaped what followed - but on the other hand, the Avro Shackleton appears in the 1935-1950 book even though its service didn't end until the 1990s.


Strange detail, that both proposals seem to carry the full armament of four guns.

[/size]I suppose they envisaged it as a gunnery trainer as well as for conversion onto type.
 

Jemiba

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pathology_doc said:
I suppose they envisaged it as a gunnery trainer as well as for conversion onto type.[/size]


Yes, maybe, although i think, two guns, one in each wing would have been sufficient (and
cheape !) just for training purposes. But as I understand, Stanley Seager did some of those
sketches from memory and although still using "MS Paper & Pencil", of course, he maybe just
started each sketch with the "standard" Wyvern, as a kind of manually copy & paste.
 

hesham

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Wow,Amazing projects my dear Jemiba,


and great thanks to my dear Lark.
 

hesham

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Excellent work Pavel,many thanks.
 

Mark Nankivil

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Fascinating Pavel - thanks! Mark
 

blackkite

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Wyvern Mk.Ⅴ!? And other variants.

https://www.the-blueprints.com/blueprints/ww2planes/ww2-westland/71824/view/westland_wyvern_s_mk_v/

https://www.the-blueprints.com/blueprints/ww2planes/ww2-westland/71031/view/westland_wyvern/

http://www.4pluspublications.com/en/bonus/016-westland-wyvern
 

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blackkite

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Wow thanks a lot!! :eek:
I found this site,too.

http://www.shipbucket.com/forums/viewtopic.php?p=102588

http://www.whatifmodellers.com/index.php?topic=36347.0
"The never-built variants of the Westland Wyvern.
The first W.34 design in mid-1944 penned by W.E.W. Petter had the Rolls-Royce Eagle behind the cockpit for excellent landing visibility and it was slightly smaller than the TF.Mk.I as built. Top speed was estimated at 420mph, all-up weight 17,300lbs. There was brief RAF interest in an escort fighter version but in the end Spec the aircraft was developed to N.11/44 for the Navy. The desire to upgrade to turboprops was built into the design, probably one reason why the layout was altered to a more conventional engine-first layout.

The W.36 was a Wyvern with a jet-engine drawn up in 1946. It would have had either a Rolls-Royce AJ.65 (became the Avon) or a Metrovick F.9 axial-jet. The plan seems to show six cannon, two in the nose and four in the wings, the exhausts were planned as flush outlets but I think this would have been modified if built into a nib-pipe like the Sea Hawk. Oddly, this split tailpipe arrange would have allowed the retention of a tailwheel undercarriage, nothing on the plan indicates a nosewheel.

The S.Mk.5E was proposed in March 1954 with a Napier E.141 Double Eland turboprop with wingtip tanks."
 

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Hood

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The brief information I put together for that shipbucket page was based on entries in Tony Buttler's BSP Vol.3 and the Westland Putnam.
Friedman in British Carrier Aviation also touched on the original mid-engine layout design.
 

blackkite

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Thanks for excellent information!!
 
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