Various Handley Page civilian aircraft designs

Jemiba

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[Civil aircraft ?] Boring ? Not at all !

1. Handley Page 117 Flying Wing

2. Handley Page slewed Wing SST
(Drawing from www.strangeplanes.com edited, as landing configuration was wrong)
 

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Antonio

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Handley Page studied some flying wing airliners.
HP.117 has been posted here by Jemiba (this design has also military variants: troop carrier and ASW)
HP.126. All wing 100 seater
HP.134 Ogee Aerobus. Evolved from HP.126 with smoother ogival plan and central fin and rudder. Designed for 154 passengers. This aircraft looks almost the same as the Airbus study but design date is between 1962 and 1965.
 

Zeppelin

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I'm intrigued by the slewed wing concept, Was that a hinged variable wing? the Landing position looks to differ from the main wing illustration.
 

Jemiba

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Fin and fuselage/cockpit nacelle would have been hinged, as well as the engines, of course.
Tried to depict this project in take-off/landing and cruising configuration for the AIAA paper
"A Summary Of A Half-Century of Oblique Wing Research" by Mike Hirschberg. Honestly not quite
sure today, why I gave it such a long landing gear. The engine pods are the limiting factor and
if the wing is slewed even further back, clearance would be further reduce, but the landing gear
would have to be slewable then, too...

Stéphane, I once found such a plan, too, but it clearly was a wrong interpretation of the concept,
the Sycamore was designed as an oblique flying wing.
From the mentioned AIAA paper, a statement from Sir Godfrey H.Lee, then deputy chief designer :
"I should like to emphasize that the above results are very preliminary and that the opinions expressed are my own and not
necessarily those of my firm. I think the results given are sufficiently near the truth to constitute an [font=timesnewroman,italic]a priori [/font]case for giving
serious consideration to the slewed-wing concept, the possibilities of which were first brought to my notice by R.T. Jones, of

N.A.S.A., during the Madrid Conference in 1958."
 

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Stargazer2006

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I removed my post as it would seem I misinterpreted the plans.

You'll have to admit, however, that the "landing configuration" depicted further above was wrong.
 

Jemiba

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No problems with admitting that, it was more or less just an attempt to show, what this
aircraft could have looked like sitting on the apron or slowly climbing after take-off.
Actually, searching through the appropriate folder, I found again, what led me to the
long landing gear: It was an article from "The Aeroplane, where it is shown in dotted lines.
Additionally, the section shows something, that could be the stowed wheels, although I'm
not sure with that, but it would show, that the landing gear would have been near the
centerline, as expected. But the drawing is described as "possible layout", so, for sure, it's
just an interpretation of the original idea. And I wouldn't take it for granted, that Sir Lee
ever bothered with the shape and position of the landing gear ... ;)
 

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Stargazer2006

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hesham, I don't think these all represent "civilian" designs, which is what this topic is about.

Besides, these pictures already exist in other topics, it is best not to duplicate them, just a link to them is enough.
 

hesham

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Stargazer2006 said:
hesham, I don't think these all represent "civilian" designs, which is what this topic is about.

Besides, these pictures already exist in other topics, it is best not to duplicate them, just a link to them is enough.

Stargazer,


all the projects are a civilian designs,that first,and second,for duplication,please see this;


http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,3428.msg27303.html#msg27303


you still don't use the search.
 

Stargazer2006

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hesham said:
you still don't use the search.
Come on, hesham. Do NOT speak to me as if I were an idiot. :mad: I use the search engine dozens of times every week... If I didn't, I couldn't possibly reorganize the forum's topics the way I've been doing over the past few weeks...

In this particular case, I didn't have the designation for the HP project that I posted, so how could I find it in that particular topic? :-\

Also, if you didn't keep creating new topics all the time (and often when it's totally unnecessary), searching for things here would be A LOT easier! ::)
 

Jemiba

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Please, would you calm down, both of you ?
First, hesham, I'm sure Stargazer is using the search function more often, than all of us !
we know, it's a little bit difficult to handle, but if you have problems, he probably is the one,
to give the best clues for it. The HP.119, for example can just be found by typing "handley
page 119" and then it shows up in its very own topic, the HP.113 was shown in several other
topics, too.
Our problem is, that amongst the mass of old topics, there are still a lot with featureless titles.
They often contain lots of worthwhile posts, but without real chances, to be found. A good example
is the "British little known aircraft and projects post WW2" thread, with aircraft ranging from human
powered aircraft to supersonic fighters. And this thread was increased recently !
I'll try to split it up now and again an appeal to you all, not to increase such clutter, but create more
precise ones and report to the moderators then, when you find posts, that could be merged.
 

hesham

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Re: Various Handley Page civilian and military transport aircraft designs

At first,I hope the Moderator change the title as above,


instead off open new topic for HP military transport aircraft.


Here is some civil and military transport aircraft projects;


HP.72 military transport project intended for C15/45 Spec.
HP.73 military transport aircraft project,based on Hastings III
HP.76 civil transport project intended for Brabazon 2B competition
HP.78 civil transport project,with four engines,for Brabazon 2B competition
HP.134 Ogee Aerobus project of 1965,powered by three by-bus turbojets


https://books.google.com.eg/books?id=L-k5AwAAQBAJ&pg=PA101&lpg=PA101&dq=Handley+Page+HP.130+aircraft&source=bl&ots=Qzx2ylsC6b&sig=HuQvGZ81entOPH4yNqyPvok1XcM&hl=ar&sa=X&ei=A76vVLW1A47saPnbgIgE&ved=0CFkQ6AEwCg#v=onepage&q=Handley%20Page%20HP.130%20aircraft&f=false
 

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Kadija_Man

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I found this drawing of the HP.113:




I was wondering if anybody has a three view drawing of it?
 

CJGibson

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It's in Vulcan's Hammer.

Chris
 

zebedee

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Ok... now that I have access to my library again it would be rude not to post a few bits and pieces from the collection...

Handley Page HP127 Jet Herald, from Herald Facts No.30

Of interest is the similarity to the fictional Scott Furlong Sovereign from the TV series The Planemakers...

Zeb
 

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zebedee

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Looks like an early iteration of the project, of note is the Canberra derived nose section*. I can't help wondering if HP had planned to use the jigs left over from their licence production of Canberras...

Zeb

*CH Barnes, Handley Page Aircraft since 1907, p.571
 

Hood

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Having looked at the HP.113 Design Study file at Kew, I could find no reference to why the Canberra nose was used. I think partly it was due to its availability and a way to keep costs done, the file is certainly very pre-occupied with how much the programme would cost, at least £4.29M in the MoS's opinion and possibly as high as £5.3M if two were built.
Also, the Canberra nose was probably among the most aerodynamic for a medium-sized aircraft at the time and HP probably felt it would have smooth fuselage laminar flow for possible further work into sucking off fuselage boundary air as also proposed for the HP airliner studies.
 

zebedee

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That makes sense Hood... another thing that came to mind whilst looking at the brochure last night was the similarity of the revised nose, particularly the glasswork, to the later Jetstream..? I wonder if some of the design work was again reused and wether the name Jetstream was originally intended for this...?

Zeb
 
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