Unknown German Rocket Gun

panzer1946

Rammtiger
Joined
May 4, 2009
Messages
22
Reaction score
3
Hello,
I found these 3 photos on the net somewhere. The only thing my notes say about it is that it is:

1. German origin
2. multiple barreled rocket gun
3. circa WW2

Can anyone verify the above, give dimensions of the unit and rockets, and also put a name to apparatus?

Thanks,
Tony "Panzer 1946" Ivey
 

Attachments

  • 7f_1_b.jpg
    7f_1_b.jpg
    16.4 KB · Views: 242
  • e5_1_b.jpg
    e5_1_b.jpg
    20.7 KB · Views: 221
  • fe_1_b.jpg
    fe_1_b.jpg
    20.2 KB · Views: 244

Grey Havoc

ACCESS: USAP
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
16,999
Reaction score
6,635
That may be one of those German rocket-based airfield defense systems that was discussed here sometime back. I'll see if I can find the thread/s.
 

Grey Havoc

ACCESS: USAP
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
16,999
Reaction score
6,635
Here's one. I think that there might been another thread that mentions them, but if there is, I haven't been able to find it, at least for now, sorry.

http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,6776.0/highlight,airfield+defense+rocket.html
 

panzer1946

Rammtiger
Joined
May 4, 2009
Messages
22
Reaction score
3
Thanks GH,
Good info there. Still not sure if the photos I posted depict a version of the flak-kabels thingies or something on line with 'fire-and-forget' rockets like the "Fohn", etc.

-Tony
 

Grey Havoc

ACCESS: USAP
Senior Member
Joined
Oct 9, 2009
Messages
16,999
Reaction score
6,635
Glad to be of help. I'll keep my eye out for more info.
 

sagallacci

ACCESS: Confidential
Joined
Jan 15, 2009
Messages
96
Reaction score
2
Looks like an early version of the Fohn (umlaut over the o ) anti-aircraft system. Operational versions used an open framework instead of the tubes.
 

Grzesio

ACCESS: Secret
Joined
Mar 20, 2008
Messages
281
Reaction score
114
Website
chemnitzer27kb.blogspot.com
What strikes me now, is the thickness of the tubes. If you look at the last picture, the tubes have really thick walls - while German rocket launchers had them in the order of 2 mm. Then, there are these cooling or reinforcing ribs on the tubes, there are these heavy pieces at the rear ends of the barrels, these wires...
I think, whatever it was, it was a muzzle loader, not necessarily a recoilless rocket launcher, rather a gun, maybe something of the 8,8 cm R Werfer 43 principle, probably intended for rapid firing, but not too rapid reloading (German AA launchers with electric ignition used either induction coils, either contact rings, with no need for connecting wires to every rocket). On the other hand, if the weapon could not be quickly reloaded, these ribs are probably not for the cooling purpose...
 

HoHun

ACCESS: Restricted
Joined
Oct 9, 2021
Messages
49
Reaction score
40
Hi Grzesio,

What strikes me now, is the thickness of the tubes. If you look at the last picture, the tubes have really thick walls - while German rocket launchers had them in the order of 2 mm. Then, there are these cooling or reinforcing ribs on the tubes, there are these heavy pieces at the rear ends of the barrels, these wires...

As the picture quality is not so great, maybe what looks like "reinforcing ribs" are in fact just wound wire coils to hold the actual launch tubes in place? I'm asking because to my eye it seems as if the ribs weren't all perfectly parallel, thus the idea we might be looking at coils.

Regards.

Henning (HoHun)
 

BB1984

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Aug 21, 2011
Messages
38
Reaction score
51
Agree that some sort of Fohn Gerat variant is most likely. In "Field Rocket Equipment of the German Army" Gander talks about a number of non-standard launchers being used. None of the ones he describes fits this particular layout, but he talks about fixed mountings being used to cover river crossing sites and a variety of ground combat oriented development versions, so some sort of developmental one off seems plausible.

The carriage also has the look of an AA platform without high elevation capability (hence my assumption of ground to ground use), though it seems to be materially different from the 3.7cm Flak platform that was used in practice.
 
Top