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Unknown Flying Boat Drawing to ID

hesham

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From L'Aeronautique 1919,

I can't ID this flying boat,maybe a Project ?.
 

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Dynoman

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Looks similar to a Felixstowe Fury, however with four engines instead of 5. The Fury flew in 1918, therefore the British design could have possibly influenced this French "High Seas" hydro-aeroplane concept. The Curtiss Wanamaker Model T four engined aircraft of 1916 could have also been an influence. Maybe a Halbron design (the HT1 twin hull triplane was French and could be a lead).
 

Aubi

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Great, I just spend at least hour trying to find that article, and right when I succeeded... :D As Schneidermann said, it is just theoretical deisgn used as illustration for the article writen by Paul Boutiron. He tries there to explain why for overseas flights, in then current state of aviation, a seaplane with engines of total power of at least 2500 hp is needed.
Badly translated quote:
"We can thus hope to create an 2500 HP ocean-going seaplane whose total weight would reach approximately ten and a half tons. However, experience shows that with good powertrain efficiencies, aircraft of 1,000 HP and above are able to lift themselves out of the sea with powers that correspond to a weight per horse of up to 9 kg,500. That is to say that by limiting this last coefficient to a minimum of about 7kg,800, or in the present case a total weight of 19 tons for 2500 HP, certainly a machine could by made that would fly easily in all circumstances."
 
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