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Towards the TriStar - The Lockheed CL-1011 "Kolk Machine"......

Caravellarella

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Dear Boys and Girls, here is a small article in French on the original twin-engined Lockheed CL-1011 "Kolk Machine". This design appears to have a wide-body horizontal ovoid fuselage cross-section. It isn't "secret", but it is a "project"......

The article comes from the 1st December 1966 issue of Aviation Magazine International......

Terry (Caravellarella)
 

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Caravellarella

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Dear Boys and Girls, here is a later piece in French on the original twin-engined Lockheed CL-1011 "Kolk Machine". This later design appears to have reverted to a wide-body circular fuselage cross-section and the engine nacelles appear to be moved rearwards under the trailing edge of the wing......

The article comes from the 15th June 1967 issue of Aviation Magazine International......

Terry (Caravellarella)
 

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Stargazer2006

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Where did you geet the "Kolk Machine" monicker from? It doesn't appear in any of the documents you've provided... ???
 

Caravellarella

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Dear Stéphane, Franklin J. Kolk (or Frank Kolk) was the American Airlines VP who drew up the original 1966 specification for a wide-body twin engined 250 seat airliner design nicknamed "The Kolk Machine" that could operate from New York La Guardia airport. This led to the Lockheed TriStar and McDonnell-Douglas DC-10; of course both aircraft ended up being somewhat different machines than originally specified.

Terry (Caravellarella)
 

fightingirish

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Found at Stingray's rotor forum:

Lockheed CL-1011-31 tri-jet and a typical 227-seat mixed-class interior arrangement.

http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1967/1967%20-%201241.html

Edit: Triton had allready posted it.
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,8458.msg75049/highlight,cl-1011.html#msg75049
 

LowObservable

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I believe that the original "Kolk machine" requirement was overwhelmed by United, which wanted an aircraft that could do two things: transcon nonstop, and meet the "Denver requirement" for either coast out of Denver. Eastbound was a long way from a high elevation, and westbound imposed a minimum single-engine altitude early in the flight. At the time neither Lockheed nor Douglas could see doing the job with a twin - later, Airbus demonstrated that the A300B4 could do it, the a 165 t MTOW for the transcon segment.

If I recall correctly, LaGuardia at the time had a runway extension load limit because it was built on piers over the water. The A300B2/B4 could do some missions out of LGA, which was a big deal for Eastern.
 

hesham

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Hi,

the Lockheed CL-1011-28 was a twin engin design and CL-1011-30,31,32 & 33 were
original Trijet designs.
 

hesham

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Hi,

the CL-1011-28 and CL-1011-31.

http://archive.aviationweek.com/image/spread/19670626/16/2
 

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