The General Staff and the Helicopter

CJGibson

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Since 1918 and the formation of the RAF, the British Army has sought its own dedicated close support capability. This finally entered the Army Air Corps (AAC) order of battle in 2004 with the arrival of the WAH-6D Apache Longbow.

The AAC had been arming its helicopters since the service’s establishment in its modern form in 1957, even if that was a Sterling poked out the door of a Skeeter. The arrival of the Scout saw heavier weapons, including guided weapons, mounted on the AAC's machines but it was the Lynx and its TOW anti-tank missiles that gave the British Army the means to halt the Soviet Horde. Meanwhile, across Europe, armies sought an attack helicopter - what the popular press call a ‘gunship’ - as an alternative to the US Apache and Europe's helicopter builders proposed types such as the Fokker/VFW/Westland P.277, Agusta A129, Eurocopter Tiger, Westland WG.44, WG.45 and WG.47 types for consideration.

The General Staff and the Helicopter examines these alternatives to the AH-64 Apache from the British Army’s perspective, drawing on previously unpublished material from HM Government and company archives to describe how the AAC’s doctrine changed from the agile, small and stealthy Agusta A129 and WG.44 of GST.3971 to the large and tough Apache of SR(A).428. This change saw the resulting procurement process become a foregone conclusion but rules of procurement saw the Cobra Venom, LHX, Mangusta, Rooivalk and Tiger up against the General Staff’s favourite; Westland’s WAH-64D Apache.

Lavishly illustrated with many previously unpublished photographs and drawings, including original artwork by Luciano Alviani, The General Staff and the Helicopter tells the story of how the British Army acquired the most formidable close support helicopter on earth as its long sought after organic close support platform.

Hopefully we'll have The General Staff and the Helicopter available in the spring.

Thanks for your ongoing support in our efforts to document areas of aerospace that receive little attention.

Chris
 

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Mark Nankivil

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Thanks for the tease Chris - look forward to obtaining a copy when it is published.

Enjoy the Day! Mark
 

hesham

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Oh my God,brilliant,thank you my dear Chris.
 

John21

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Any new news for when it’s coming out? Its been about 6 months since the last news.
 

pf matthews

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I second that enquiry.
Looking forward to it joining its' companions on the bookshelf
 

CJGibson

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It's in purdah. Currently working on Typhoon to Typhoon, so once that's out of the way, I'll get back to it.

Chris
 

kaiserd

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Please keep us posted, sounds & looks great :)
 

CJGibson

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Prompted by John21, I have dug out GSATH and doing a spot of editing.

Here's a question:

Fairey Ultralight?
Fairey Ultra Light?
Fairey Ultra-Light?

I've seen it all three ways.

Chris
 

TsrJoe

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Ultra Light or Ultra-Light seems most common on Fairey paperwork and literature, the former on drawings, latter on ad material, the single word Ultralight possibly a modern contraction?

https://m.facebook.com/groups/424714227697738?view=permalink&id=657644377738054
 

Hood

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I went with Ultra Light for TAATH. That seems to be the most common form on the Fairey and ministry documents of the time.

I agree with Joe, Ultralight is probably a modern mistake.
I never entirely trust the ministry authors, they seem to have typed whatever they liked on their minutes and memorandums, e.g. T.S.R.2, TSR-2, TSR.2, TSR2, Provost T. Mark 1, T Mk.1, T Mk1, T.1, Mark 1. You could go cross eyed trying to untangle all that!
 

gatoraptor

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I've never quite been sure of the correct designation for the TSR2. Obviously, no one else is, either!
 
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