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Tempest - UK Future fighter programme

galgot

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Ok, thks. wasn't familiar with the use of this word...
"put the program in hyperdrive and take global Britain back into the stratosphere"...
Common Mr. Wallace, be more ambitious , pass the stratosphere and go orbital. Not that difficult with an Hyperdrive.
 
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Avimimus

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red admiral said:
FighterJock said:
I think that as a design it is back to the CAD computers, a total redesign is needed before the RAF will accept this fighter.
Why do you think that? Its obviously an early design iteration and as stated, just a look at what the future could look like.
As a design right now it would not survive for very long in the current close in dogfighting against the likes of the Su-57 with the advanced thrust vectored R-74M.
Well, the benefit of DEWs (in theory at least)... and the benefit of BVR...
 

Foo Fighter

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You ought to try Man Maths, the same system that enables the new car to be much more affordable if it's a sports car rather than and SUV. It also allows for speed faster than thought. Unless you don't know where you're going. Waver, unless the wife is navigating.
 

Grey Havoc

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Trump pressures Tokyo to choose US fighter jet over rival BAE
Japan is looking at UK company to develop an alternative to its F-2 aircraft


A deal to replace Japan's F-2s would be worth tens of billions of dollars © AP


Demetri Sevastopulo in Washington and Robin Harding in Tokyo 3 hours ago


The Trump administration is pressuring Japan to choose a US defence company to develop jointly a replacement for its F-2 fighter jets as Tokyo considers a British alternative to cut its reliance on American weapons.Pentagon officials have stepped up talks with Japan amid concerns the US could lose out to BAE Systems, the UK defence contractor developing a sixth generation Tempest stealth fighter, according to three people familiar with discussions about the F-3 programme.Tokyo wants to replace its F-2s when they retire from around 2035 and plans to start development next year, in a deal that would be worth tens of billions of dollars. It is considering three options: collaborating with BAE; working with Lockheed Martin, the US maker of the F-22 and F-35 jets; or developing a plane domestically.The US air force is worried that choosing a UK fighter would create interoperability issues. American officials are also concerned that opting for a British jet would anger President Donald Trump, just as Washington and Tokyo are engaged in tough talks about how much each should pay towards maintaining their alliance.The US stunned Japan in July when it said it would request a fourfold increase to $8bn when the allies renegotiated the “special measures agreement” that determines their contributions.


Eric Sayers, a Japan expert at Beacon Global Strategies, an advisory firm, said Japan would be making its fighter jet decision just as tensions “could be boiling” over cost sharing. “Tokyo should be able to make its own sovereign decision about which option . . . to replace the F-2,” he said. “But President Trump has a record of taking a transactional approach to alliances and the Abe government should not expect he will view the special measures agreement negotiation and this large procurement decision as separate.” Mr Trump has made Japan — and his own military officials — nervous by threatening to withdraw troops unless Tokyo pays more. He has also frequently touted Japanese purchases of US weapons in his meetings with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Taro Kono, the Japanese defence minister, recently told the Financial Times that he was open to collaboration with a European programme such as Tempest, underlining the concerns in Washington. One senior US defence official stressed that Japan should view interoperability as “a significant factor” to consider. “Because of the importance of the alliance and the current security dynamics in the region, we would obviously prefer the Japanese work with the US on their future fighter programme,” the official said. “There are a few examples of going it alone that have taken too long, cost too much and not done much for interoperability.”


Michael Green, a former top White House official with close ties to the Abe administration, said the Pentagon’s lobbying was paying dividends after Tempest gained early momentum. “The US government is organising itself around a campaign for an American fighter. And in the Japanese government, some of the big pieces have shifted so that the momentum is shifting towards a capabilities-based decision which would benefit a design based on an already existing US platform,” said Mr Green. “But it is not over. The momentum could shift back since there are lots of variables.” Japan has long dreamt of building a domestic aircraft to match its famous second world war-era Zero fighter. The project to build its own plane gained urgency last year when Mr Abe opted to buy 105 fully-assembled F-35s from the US. One Japanese executive said that had left local industry desperate for a new fighter programme to work on. The US has proposed jointly developing a fighter based on the F-35 and F-22. But it would limit the use of Japanese technology, resulting in a “black box” fighter with no access to the source code required for independent upgrades — something the Japanese air force would like and many lawmakers consider essential to sovereignty. “The most important thing for a future fighter aircraft is capability,” said Itsunori Onodera, a Diet member and two-time defence minister. “Then there is data links, including to US networks. And then it is also necessary to have freedom to upgrade.” Mr Onodera said Japanese industry did not have the capability to go it alone and the cost per unit of building exclusively for the domestic market would be prohibitive. He added the similar timeline of the Tempest made collaboration with the UK a “reasonable possibility” but the decision would depend on capability, cost and the potential for upgrades. The decision will be up to Mr Abe, who will have to choose between independent technology and nationalist hopes or the US alliance and his prized relationship with Mr Trump.

Follow Demetri Sevastopulo and Robin Harding on Twitter: @dimi and @RobinBHarding
 
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fredymac

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Non instrumented cockpit. The only issue I see is whether they would want to go with a totally virtual reality display or to use an augmented VR display which lets you see the real world in addition to all the information.

 

Deltafan

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From French weekly magazine Air & Cosmos n°2691 from 05.06.2020, page 3, rubric "Confidential" :

The British Tempest fighter program does not leave Washington indifferent, who sees it as a way to weaken the Scaf program carried by France, Germany and Spain in other countries of the European Union. Suddenly, Tempest could well benefit from financial support from the United States. Funding that will go hand in hand with the integration of American equipment in the future "bubble" of which Tempest will be one of the tools. A "bubble" in which Eastern European countries will be offered to participate. Union is a fight.
No original source mentioned.
 

TomcatViP

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Source: Trappiér paranoid mind?

Sharing sub-systems among fleet is an openly voiced priority for the next Gen of allied fleet to build a resilient and affordable ecosystem similar to airliners.

From Australia to Japan and westward to the US across Europe (as a geographical reference). EoA.
 
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helmutkohl

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nice awesome link

but the 3d Model does have significant differences. its a lot less fatty and more sleek compared to the mock up

here's some pics so everyone can see. also note the bay doors. they look a bit tiny

over all I like the look a lot more here. maybe more than that FCAS mock up by dassault, although i like the airbus one more
 

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TomcatViP

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Yes, huge wings. If those verticals are not collapsible, why that for a fighter?
 

FighterJock

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nice awesome link

but the 3d Model does have significant differences. its a lot less fatty and more sleek compared to the mock up

here's some pics so everyone can see. also note the bay doors. they look a bit tiny

over all I like the look a lot more here. maybe more than that FCAS mock up by dassault, although i like the airbus one more
The Tempest design has certainly improved over the first design that was released at the Farnborough airshows couple of years ago though it still has a way to go before the Tempest design is finally frozen. My judgement on this latest design, out of ten stars, I would currently give it five out of ten.
 

Hood

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I've seen more well polished fan art to be honest.
I'm not going to get excited about a 3D model for a public relations page. Anyone in the PR department could have been asked to knock that together.
 

red admiral

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I've seen more well polished fan art to be honest.
As a 3D interactive graphic embedded in a web page (similar to other aircraft on the RAF) website, it's obviously not going to be very high resolution.
 

Sundog

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I've seen much better interactive models. The Tempest model at that site looks like it was modeled by Fisher-Price. I wouldn't trust anything there, other than the what's written. Having said that, the large wing makes sense. Low wing loading, low structural weight, large internal volume. Everything you would want in a fighter wing.
 

DrRansom

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I think that future fighters will trade maneuverability for range and payload and leave dog-fighting to missiles and UCAVs.
 

helmutkohl

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wow I keep posting pictures of the FB-22 to compare it with
but this site keeps deleting it.
is posting pics of the FB-22 against site policies or something
 

Grey Havoc

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UK’s Tempest air defence project set for £50m Saab investment (ft.com)

Sweden’s leading defence contractor will this week announce plans to invest an initial £50m in the UK to develop technology for future combat air systems. The move by Saab provides a timely boost to the UK-led Tempest future fighter project as the Ministry of Defence weighs its spending priorities for a strategic defence review that is expected later this year. Industry is hoping for a government commitment to the future combat air requirement in the review, people close to the subject said. Saab’s decision marks an intensification of its partnership with Britain’s BAE Systems on the Tempest programme, which also includes Leonardo of Italy. Tempest was launched in 2018 after France and Germany opted for their own new-generation combat air programme without the UK. The project is looking at a suite of technologies to be used in a combat air system, which could involve manned and unmanned aircraft, drones and laser weapons. Saab’s investment comes as Ben Wallace, defence secretary, is expected on Monday to announce commitments from UK-based companies to be suppliers to Tempest. These include GKN, Thales UK, Qinetiq, Martin-Baker and others.
Micael Johansson, Saab’s chief executive, said his company intended to set up a research centre in the UK to be close to BAE Systems’ Tempest teams, which are based in Lancashire. The investment was proof of his company’s commitment to the UK and the programme, he stressed. “Combat air capability is extremely important for us and a security interest for Sweden,” he said. “This is absolutely a sign that it is critically important to us to be part of this combat air development. It is a sign of how important the UK is to us.” Saab, maker of the Gripen combat jet, employs more than 300 people in the UK and has long been a supplier to all three armed services. The number of jobs to be created by the £50m investment, which will focus on developing sensor and aeronautics technology, had not yet been decided, the company said.
People working on the Tempest programme said the industrial collaboration was working well, despite the constraints of the coronavirus pandemic. “We are focusing on how we are going to operate rather than what we are going to be doing. Where you get delays is if you don’t sort out that construct early on,” said one senior Tempest executive. The project is expected to submit a business case for the programme by the end of this year, when the Ministry of Defence would be expected to make a decision on further funding.
 

kaiserd

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To clarify the (not entirely visible) headline Saab firms up technological partnership but no commitment to Tempest.
 
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