Stearman models

Stargazer2006

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Hi! the Stearman company existed long before the company was taken over by Boeing. And even when it became Boeing-Wichita, it continued to use its own model numbering system for a while. Here's a simplified version of the list:


C-1 / C-1X / C-3A (c/n 101) (N?4100)

C-2 / C-2A / C-2B / C-2H / C-2K / C-2MB? (c/n 102/132)*

C-3B Sport Commercial / C-3B Special / C-3C / C-3D / C-3F / C-3H / C-3K / C-3L / C-3MB (c/n 133/248)*

1 M-2 "Bull Stearman" / M-2 Speedmail / M-2 Special (c/n 1001/1007)(N?9051/9055,8199,8827)

2 LT-1 Light Transport (c/n 2001/2003)(NC8829,8832,8833)

3 CAB-1 Coach (c/n 3001, N?8808)

4 Model 4 Speedmail (41 built, c/n 4001/4041)*
C-4 / C-4A / C-4E?
Model 4-C Junior Speedmail
Model 4-CM/4-CM1 Senior Speedmail
Model 4-D/4-DX Junior Speedmail
Model 4-DM/4-DM1 Senior Speedmail
Model 4-E Junior Speedmail
Model 4-E Special
Model 4-EM/4-EM1 Senior Speedmail
Model 4-EX Senior Speedmail
Model 4-RM Special

5 C-3R Business Speedster (c/n 5001/5039)*
C-3P (c/n 5039)(NR/NC567Y)

6 Model 6 Cloudboy (10 built, a.k.a. Boeing Model 295):
c/n 6001 (X/NC786H) = Model 6-A / Model 6-F / Model 6-D / Model 6-L / Model 6-H, USAAC YBT-5
c/n 6002 (NC787H) = Model 6-A / Model 6-F? / Model 6-P / Model 6-L?
c/n 6003 (NC788H) = Model 6-A?/ Model 6-F / Model 6-P / Model 6-L
c/n 6004 (NC795H) = Model 6-A / Model 6-L
c/n 6005 (USAAC YPT-9)(31-460) = Model 6-A? / Model 6-F
c/n 6006 (USAAC YPT-9, YBT-3, YPT-9C)(31-461) = Model 6-A? / Model 6-F
c/n 6007 (USAAC YPT-9)(31-462) = Model 6-A? / Model 6-F
c/n 6008 (USAAC YPT-9, YPT-9A, YPT-9B) = Model 6-A? / Model 6-F
c/n 6009 (NC564Y) = Model 6-H / Model 6-A / Model 6-L
c/n 6010 (N?2143) = Model 6-C
Model 6-L1 (preliminary study for X70 prototype)

7 Model X70 Sportster (c/n 7001, X571Y) (USAAC evaluation as XPT-943)
Model 73 (c/n 73000)(NC571Y?) (became Navy XNS-1, no military registration)
Model 73B1 (US Navy NS-1) (c/n 73001/73061) (Navy #9677/9717 and #0191/0210
Model A73B1 (c/n 73072/73078) (Cuba, #43/49)
Model 73L3 and A73L3 (c/n 73062/73071) (Philippine Constabulary)
Model X75/X75L3 (c/n 75000) (USAAC XPT-945, procured as XPT-13) (NX/NC14407 > 36-2 > N53226)
Model 75(L1) (USAAC PT-13 Kaydet) (c/n 75002/75026) (A.C. #36-3/27)
Model A75 (USAAC PT-13A Kaydet) (c/n 75027/75098) (A.C. #37-71/114 and 37-232/259)
Model A75L3 civilian and export version: private (4), Brazil (20), Philippine O-1 (12), Venezuela (7)
(under ATC-743, post-war conversions of A75, B75 or E75 models became A75L3 too).
Model A75L5 export variant for China (20 built, + 2 probably built locally under license)
Model A75L300 any Model 75L/N/J planes modified according to Misssissippi Valley Air
Service, Clarksdale, Mississippi
Model B75(L1) (US Navy N2S-2) (125 examples originally from Army production)
Model E75(L1) (USAAF PT-13D Kaydet and US Navy N2S-5)
Model E75L300 probably similar to the A75L300 modification
Model 75N1 Kaydet (existed?)
Model A75N1 (USAAF PT-17/A/B Kaydet, US Navy N2S-1, N2S-4 and Philippine PT-13)
(under ATC-743, the designation was also given to all PT-17/-27/N2S-1/-3/-4 post-war conversions)
Model B75N1 (US Navy N2S-3 and post-war conversions)
Model D75N1 (RCAF PT-27 Kaydet, 300 built)
Model E75N1 apparently former E75(L1) planes modified with Continental engines
Model A75J1 (USAAF PT-18 Kaydet and post-war conversions)
Model A75B4 export variant for Venezuela (5 built)
Model IB75A designates any Model 75L/N/J planes modified according to Inland Aviation Co.
Model A76C3 version for Brazil (15 built)
Model B76C3 version for Brazil (15 built)
Model 76D1 version for Argentina (6 built) and the Philippines as BT-1 (3 built)
Model S76D1 seaplane version of above, also for Argentina and the Philippines (19 total)
Model 76D3 armed advanced trainer for Philippine Constabulary as BT-1 (24 built) and for Cuba (24 built)
Model A76B4 version for Venezuela (5 built)

8 Model (X)80 Sportster (c/n 8001, NC11720)
Model 81 Sportster (c/n 8101, NC570Y)
Model 82 Sportster (undocumented version, probably cancelled)
Model X85 (U.S. Navy XOSS-1, c/n 85000, USN #1052)

9 Model X90 (PT contender, rejected) (c/n 90000, NX21924)
Model X91 (USAAF XBT-17, c/n 91000, USAAF 42-8726)

10 Model X100 (USAAC XA-21, c/n 100000, A.C. #40-191)

11 ??

12 Model X120 Crewmaker (USAAF XAT-15, c/n X120000/X120001, A.F. #41-23162/23163)
Model 120 (USAAF AT-15-MC production version by McDonnell; cancelled)

? Waco CG-4A-CE (Cessna subcontract)*

? Boeing B-29 Superfortress*

? Boeing B-47 Stratojet*

20 Model 200 Scout (USAF XL-15, c/n 200001 and 200002, A.F. # 46-520/521)
Model 200 Scout (USAF YL-15-BW, c/n 200003/200012, A.F. # 47-423/432)

? Boeing B-52 Stratofortress*


NOTES:
- Figures in red are NOT model numbers, but numerals that indicate order of project. They make up the first two figures of the constructor's production numbers.
- Asterisk (*) indicates registration numbers too numerous to mention here.
 

Stargazer2006

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As an addendum, I would like to add some projects that are related to Stearman but do not fit in the timeline above:

CURTISS with STEARMAN

US Navy F6C-3 Hawk biplane fighter design was co-produced with Stearman


STEARMAN SWALLOW

No details, appears in civil register as N?3503, 3504 and 3592 (c/n 1)


STEARMAN-DEZIN

(OX-5) No details (c/n 20-H) (N?9466)


NORTHROP-STEARMAN

For a brief time, the models Beta 3D, Alpha 3, Alpha 4 and Alpha 4A were known under this name.


STEARMAN-HAMMOND

Initial prototype done by Hammond as Model Y Safety Plane (c/n 301) (NX15151).
Production version redesigned by Hammond and Lloyd Stearman.

Y-1 (a.k.a. Y-125) (c/n 302/303) (X73/NS73/NX15770 and NS5/N(X)18615)
Y-1M (c/n 304/305) (US Navy JH-1, BuAer #908/909)
Y-1S (a.k.a. Y-150) (c/n 306/320) (NC15521/15534 except c/n 311 to Netherlands as PH-APY and military R2676)
Note: a later model called the Kaiser-Hammond Y-2 Aircar did not involve Stearman.


STEARMAN(-JENSEN*), later ARIEL AIRCRAFT INC.
These 1940-1942 aircraft are not related to Lloyd C. Stearman but to Glenn A. Stearman, a younger cousin of Lloyd's.
Ariel A* (c/n A-1) (NX25471)
Ariel B (N32459 and ?)
Ariel C (no details, possibly just a project or the second Ariel B prototype redesignated)
 

Stargazer2006

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Don't know if this is of any interest to anyone (pre-war US stuff doesn't seem to be very much in demand around here) but I've updated the posts above to include all Models 75 and 76 variants and items on Curtiss/Stearman and Northrop-Stearman.
 

Maveric

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...some info about the relationship between Boeing Model 329 and Stearman Model 19!
 

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Stargazer2006

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Very interesting. I have always believed that all Stearman aircraft must have also gotten a Boeing Model number after the company's takeover in 1935, and this is yet another piece of evidence towards this. Model 295, for instance, was Boeing's designation for Stearman's Model 6-L (and possibly all Model 6 Cloudboy aircraft).

What really bugs me in this article, however, is the introduction of the "Stearman Model 19" designation, which I will discard as erroneous, unless some period document emanating from Stearman themselves can prove me wrong.

Why? In EVERY source I read until now on the subject of the XA-21 prototype (and there have been quite a few), the aircraft has ALWAYS been refered to as the Model X100. This is completely logical as:
1°) the prototypes always got an "X" prefix (X70, X73, X80...)
2°) starting with Model "7" the aircraft were designated with two digits (Models 70,73,75,76 for the Kaydet, Model 80 for the Sportster, Model 85 for the XOSS-1, Models 90,91 for what became the XBT-17)
3°) the XA-21 appeared after the XBT-17 (X91) and before the XAT-15 Crewmaker (X120)
...and so the numeral 100 for the tenth Stearman model is completely logical.

There is therefore absolutely NO reason whatsoever that this airplane should have been a "Model 19". The Model "20" (in fact Model 200) was the much later Boeing YL-15 Scout, and if there had been a "Model 19", it would have been postwar and designated Model 190, anyway.
 

Stargazer2006

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Found mention of the YL-15 as being the "Model 202", as opposed to the XL-15, which was Model 200. Hope this was not a typo...
 

Stargazer2006

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Here's a little something to scratch your head over... One of those designation-related mysteries that we all love to get our heads steaming about! (well, at least if you've wandered into this section of the forum, there's a good chance for that!)

Here is a 1929 Bendix Brakes ad which talks about "the Stearman Models 68 and 86". Now wouldn't it be cool to add these to our existing list? Except it's impossible! These designations do NOT belong ANYWHERE!

index.php
index.php


I can hear you say: "Hey! But Skyblazer, these fit perfectly! "Model 68" goes just before the famous Model 70 (the prototype of the Kaydet line), and "Model 86" just after the Model 85 (the Navy's XOSS-1)! Well, it looks it, but NO!! Nada! Niente! Absolutely NOT!

Why? Because the Model 70 (the first of the two-digit models) came out in 1933, four years later. The XOSS-1 appeared in 1938! At the time of this 1929 advertisement, there were just NO two-digit designations at Stearman! In 1929, the only Stearman designations that existed were the C- types (C-1, C-2, C-3, C-4 and their variants, which added letter suffixes), while new models for 1929 were: the M-2 Super-Mail, better known by its nickname, the "Bull Stearman"; the LT-1 Light Transport; and the CAB-1 Coach. the Model 4 Speedmail series appeared a bit later, in 1930. As you can clearly see, no designation is even remotely similar to "68" and "86".

I know what you might think (we designation buffs often think along the same lines): What if they used... ATC numbers? Good idea, but it's not that. ATC #68 was the Curtiss-Robertson Robin B, while ATC #86 was the Laird LC-B, both in 1928. Group 2 Approvals? Nope. #2-68 was for the Sikorsky S-38B Special, while #2-86 was for the Fairchild 51, both in 1929. Absolutely no Stearmans there!

Okay... So what if they used constructor's numbers? Not very logical to use individual airplane numbers to designate a whole series of identical aircraft, but who knows? It did happen on a couple of occasions in aviation history... Unfortunately, it doesn't work either. And why not? Because construction numbers at Stearman started with c/n 101, the sole C-1/C-1X, later registered [4100]! No two-digit c/ns there EVER!

According to the ad, "The success of Stearman Models 68 and 86 is partly due to Bendix wheels and brakes"... Success? What success? These types have never been heard of, least of all as "successful" models! The only successful models from the company thus far were the C-2 series (28 of all versions produced) and especially the C-3 series (122 of all versions produced). Considering the two photos provided in the ad to illustrate the "Models 68 and 86", we can clearly see that these are C-2 and C-3 types! (even the registration [5490] is visible in the lower picture... and it belonged... to a C-2B!)

So why would Bendix call a C-2 a "68"? A (major) typo, resulting from someone's bad writing, that eventually took a life of its own? But then, what of "86"? Doesn't look much like C-3!

I'll try and dig further, but I'd be curious to have the opinion of all the seasoned lovers of vintage American airplanes on this forum!
 

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Boxman

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Here is British Pathe newsreel coverage of the Stearman-Hammond Y-1 (X73 / NX73 / NS73 ) "Safety Plane" submission. The gentleman talking in the film is Eugene Vidal, father of author Gore Vidal, and the then Director of Aeronautics for the U.S. Department of Commerce.

YouTube - British Pathé "Non-Spin Plane Aka New Fool-Proof Aeroplane Tested" (1936)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xce5U1Iwi_M
 

hesham

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In my files,

there was a Model-88,is that a typo or what ?.
 

Stargazer2006

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Boxman said:
Here is British Pathe newsreel coverage of the Stearman-Hammond Y-1 (X73 / NX73 / NS73 ) "Safety Plane" submission. The gentleman talking in the film is Eugene Vidal, father of author Gore Vidal, and the then Director of Aeronautics for the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Vidal also created the "Weldwood" process and the Aircraft Research Corp., which was to have built the XBT-11 trainer. Eventually, Vidal did build a "plywood" trainer for the USAAF in the form of the XBT-16 (a Vultee Valiant with a Weldwood fuselage), now under the Vidal Research Corp. name.
 

hesham

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From Wings of Stearman.
 

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