Scanning transparencies

Bill S

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Slides? Overheads? Positives? Negatives?
 

overscan (PaulMM)

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Well, you need a scanner that supports transparencies, but thats pretty much all of them. You normally take off the inner part of the scanner lid, and place a plastic frame on the scanner which holds the slide(s) in position. You sometimes have to change mode in the scanner to select the source correctly. Then you scan at the absolute highest resolution possible (as the slide is small).

You often get dust and stuff on the scan, thats a whole other problem. You can wipe the original a bit before scanning, but also some postproduction techniques can help remove it.

We probably need more info on what you trying to do.
 

Jemiba

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To my experience, based on 25 x 36 mm slides, even with the highest res quality is
insufficient, so there's the need for a dedicated slide scanner (prices from around 80,- €
to 600,- €). Apart from the scan quality, there's the question of handling and if you have
to scan large numbers of slides a professional scan service may be advisable.
 

Bill S

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Slide scanner is the only way to go to get the best if you are
thinking of preservation or publication.

I have a Nikon Coolscan which is actually the second I bought
I got a single slide version first, and really needed a feeder
for the number of slides I have to scan, so I upgraded.

I have the first one in storage, someday someone will
get a good deal on that one.
 

Steve Pace

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overscan said:
Well, you need a scanner that supports transparencies, but thats pretty much all of them. You normally take off the inner part of the scanner lid, and place a plastic frame on the scanner which holds the slide(s) in position. You sometimes have to change mode in the scanner to select the source correctly. Then you scan at the absolute highest resolution possible (as the slide is small).

You often get dust and stuff on the scan, thats a whole other problem. You can wipe the original a bit before scanning, but also some postproduction techniques can help remove it.

We probably need more info on what you trying to do.
I'm trying to scan a 4x5in transparency.
 

Bill S

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XB-70 Guy said:
overscan said:
Well, you need a scanner that supports transparencies, but thats pretty much all of them. You normally take off the inner part of the scanner lid, and place a plastic frame on the scanner which holds the slide(s) in position. You sometimes have to change mode in the scanner to select the source correctly. Then you scan at the absolute highest resolution possible (as the slide is small).

You often get dust and stuff on the scan, thats a whole other problem. You can wipe the original a bit before scanning, but also some postproduction techniques can help remove it.

We probably need more info on what you trying to do.
I'm trying to scan a 4x5in transparency.
I have an Epson V700 with film holders for items that size and larger.
 
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