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Operation ZZ ("Der Tag")

Grey Havoc

The path not taken.
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http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-30128199​
 

Jemiba

CLEARANCE: Above Top Secret
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Thanks for this reminder !
It should be noted perhaps, that the German fleet actually didn't "surrender" at this day, but
got "interned". Maybe sounding like nitpicking today, but very important back then.
There still had been not peace talks, so the fate of the fleet wasn't clear and the interned ships
actually didn't represent the whole fleet, just the most modern part of it. The dreadnoughts of
the Nassau and Oldenburg-classes still were in German harbours and so excluded from being
scuttled in 1919.
 

Grey Havoc

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Battle of Jutland centenary: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-36406780 / http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-36417278

EDIT: Should have added main article.
 

nuuumannn

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It might be worth remembering that Operation ZZ was the internment of the German ships in the Firth of Forth on 21 November 1918. The lower picture posted by Grey Havoc in his opening post shows the position of the ships on their arrival in the Forth estuary. The German ships were led into the Forth by the cruiser HMS Cardiff, with SMS Seydlitz at the head of the German line and in attendance flanking the ships were airships from the RNAS airship station at East Fortune. That photograph of Hindenburg was also taken on the 21st November 1918. The German fleet was received by Admiral Beatty aboard his flagship HMS Queen Elizabeth. After spending the night in the Firth of Forth, one by one, over the next few days the German ships then sailed for Scapa.

In the image below, the Seydlitz is being led by HMS Cardiff. Seydlitz was of course presumed sunk after Jutland, but underwent repair and was positioned at the head of the German line as a gesture of defiance. A couple of the airships providing escort can be seen above.
 

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