O'Neill "PeaPod"

Jemiba

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Shown in "Der Flieger", August 1964 (mentioned in Flight, too : http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1962/1962%20-%202274.html)
probably had chances of being one of the smallest manned aircraft ever flown ... if it actually flew ! In Flight it is still remarked as "not yet flown".
Span 2.44 m, length 2.74 m, powered by a 35 hp boat engine, built for about 800,- US $.
 

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shedofdread

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What an intriguing little design! I'd have to guess that it never quite made it into the air - I haven't done the maths but guessing at the likely wing loading and the power, coupled with the low efficiency layout, the augeries aren't favourable...

What was the old Capt. Eric Brown quote? "Prone is a great position... but not for flying an aeroplane"? Something like that?
 

Arjen

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Found another Peapod image here: http://www.nestofdragons.net/weird-airplanes/proned-pilots/
Data on Peapod available here: http://www.aerofiles.com/_o.html
Terrence O'Neill, Ft Wayne IN.
Aristocraft II 1963 = 4pChwM; 200hp Lycoming IO-360. Built from parts of the original Waco Aristocraft including the wings, struts, and horizontal tail. Twin fins were retained, but the engine was moved to the nose. Taildragger configuration. POP: 1 [N34219].
Model W 1968 = 6pChwM; 200hp Lycoming IO-360; span: 37'6" length: 26'0" v: 127/109/47 range: 870. A rebuild of Aristocraft II with a single fin and tricycle gear. POP: 1 [N34219]. A more powerful version with a 350hp Page radial engine was planned.

Pea Pod 1963 = 1pCmwM canard; 35hp Kiekhaefer O-4-35 mounted inside the vertical fin; span: 8'0" length: 9'0" load: 220# v (est): 132/115/55 range (est): 350. This odd ship might best be described as a flying barn door with its angular wing of 1.6 aspect ratio. The pilot had a prone position, with most of his body inside the wing. The plane could be carried atop the family auto. Taxi tests were performed, but it reportedly never flew. POP: 1 [N10T].

On the subject of *small* aircraft: http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,12801.msg126282.html#msg126282

<edit> Found a very small Peapod image with google, but its origin http://virtualultralightmuseum.com/ seems to be offline.
 

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Jemiba

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Thanks for those photos, Arjen, shows, that O'Neill obviously was tinkering with the engine installation. With
the prop shown in the colour photo, it looks more like a speed boat, than an aircraft !
BTW, the site you linked is still online, but the only photo is actually in that low res.
 

Arjen

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Jemiba said:
BTW, the site you linked is still online, but the only photo is actually in that low res.
A minimalist site, that. Nicely in step with its subject :)
 

Arjen

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Have tried http://virtualultralightmuseum.com again, it's online now, and it's full to the brim with all things ultralight.
 

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