blackstar

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royabulgaf

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That photo by Carmelo- Is that William Lundigan, AKA "Colonel McCauley" from "Men into Space"?
 

Michel Van

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KJ_Lesnick said:
Has anybody here heard anything about the Dumbo Rocket?

DUMBO was a competing design to NERVA
sadly there there only budget for one Concept, so they take NERVA and dump the other

DUMBO have a far superior mass flow as NERVA, therefor a far superior thrust, But needed a Nozzle with much active cooling needs as NERVA.
here PDF about DUMBO
https://web.archive.org/web/20120204044749/http://www.dunnspace.com/00339489.pdf
 

magnus_z

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hesham said:
also Lockheed Nuclear space vehicle.
http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1959/1959%20-%202631.html?search=nuclear%20powered%20space
Nuclear space ship possible now

SEATTLE (AP) — A reactor-powered space ship which could keep going for a year at cosmic speed can be built now, a space scientists asserted Wednesday.
The device would consist of a nuclear reactor about the size of an oil drum, a passenger cabin and a piece of coaxial cable a mile long. In space the reactor would be at one end of the cable and the cabin at the other.
In this setup the reactor would supply electrical current which would travel along the cable to the rear end of the cabin. There the current would convert atoms of cesium, a rare metal, into charged particles and cause them to act like hot gases coming out of a jet.
The jet would be located at the rear end of the cabin, where the cable from the reactor would be attached. The cable would keep the reactor far enough away from the cabin to prevent exposure of the passengers to radiation. It also would tow the reactor.
A proposal for such a reactor was put before the American Institute of Electrical Engineers Wednesday in a paper prepared by Dr. Gail B. Shook. Dr. Shook is a physicist at the Lockheed Missiles and Space Laboratory, Palo Alto, Calif.
A feature of the reactor would be the direct conversion of its heat into electrical current by tiny battery-like things called thermionic cells. Heat from the reactor would cause electrons to boil off an inner surface of the barrel. The cells, on another inner surface, would collect the electrons and move them down the cable in the form of a 100-volt current.
At the rear end of the passenger cabin the current would heat powdered cesium into vapor. It also would heat a metallic grid which would give the vaporized cesium an electrical charge, causing them to shoot out the jet exhaust as speeding ions.
The big problem, Dr. Shook said would be to get the assembly into gravity free space. He suggested this might be done with two large rocket engines — one for the reactor and one for the cabin. They would be fired simultaneously, lifting reactor, cable and cabin — all assembled into a working unit into space.
The ions in the ship's jet, Dr. Shook said, would produce only a feeble amount of thrust, about a thousandth of the force of gravity. But this would be enough to move the ship through airless, gravity free space at high speed.

(Ellensburg Daily Record. - 1959. - June 24. - p. 1).

Vehicle Would Use Ion Propulsion in Space

Lockheed Missiles and Space Division has proposed a space vehicle (left) to be propelled by a low-thrust ion rocket after vehicle and nuclear reactor are boosted into space by a chemical rocket. Spacecraft would be separated from reactor by a mile-long coaxial cable for radiation protection. Reactor is at 2,100C and "boils” electrons off thermionic cells (right) placed around outer shell of reactor, thereby directly producing electrical energy which is transmitted through cable to power ionic propulsion system. Total power yield of 34-ton unit would be 1,000 kw.

(Aviation Week Including Space Technology. - 1959. - Aug 3. - p. 63).

Scientists at the Lockheed Missiles and Space Division have proposed a relatively simple "cocoon" system for a manned flight to Mars. The new design — seen here in an artist’s impression—differs from other proposed Mars systems by using two huge chemical booster-rockets (top left and bottom right) as part of the Mars ship itself. In the impression the glowing, trailing object (bottom left) is a nuclear reactor to provide power for air supplies and other important life-support systems. Inside the cut-away section of the nearest chemical rocket-booster (top left) can be seen a return-to-Earth vehicle, with, at the other end of the cable (bottom right) a chemical rocket-booster containing equipment for a Martian landing.
(The Age (Melbourne). - 1961. - May 24. - p. 21)

Postage stamps:
http://www.fandom.ru/about_fan/zubakin_91.htm
 

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edwest2

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I doubt this will ever be practical. Another possibility is converting solar energy collected through giant solar panel farms on the Moon to microwaves and beaming it to large arrays being towed by spacecraft. The arrays could be detached and left in orbit.
 

Foo Fighter

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I remember discussing this years ago and people talking about the quantities of radiation that would result, I never got a resolved answer about how much beyond background the result would be, anyone here know?
 

Archibald

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To recover the documents losts a decade ago, courtesy of Senator Frank Dumbarse Wolf and a supposed Chinese "spy" which actually only spied porn sites.
Roast in hell, demons of stupidity !

(and since then the NTRS has gone from bad to worse. Geez... is the shittier and shittier search software a ruse against Chinese sex-addicts, pardon, chinese spies ? )
 

tequilashooter

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Dont think this was posted here. https://spacenews.com/darpa-selects...velop-spacecraft-for-nuclear-propulsion-demo/

"WASHINGTON — The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency selected Blue Origin and Lockheed Martin to develop competing spacecraft concepts for a demonstration of nuclear thermal propulsion, the agency announced April 12.

Under a program called DRACO, short for demonstration rocket for agile cislunar operations, DARPA wants to demonstrate nuclear thermal propulsion technology — using a nuclear reactor to heat up rocket fuel to generate thrust.

DARPA awarded General Atomics a $22 million contract to develop the nuclear reactor. Lockheed Martin’s contract value is $2.9 million and the Blue Origin’s is $2.5 million.

The goal of the program is to launch a spacecraft driven by nuclear thermal propulsion above low Earth orbit in 2025. DARPA believes this technology will allow spacecraft to travel huge distances quickly.

“Rapid maneuver in the space domain has traditionally been challenging because current electric and chemical space propulsion systems have drawbacks in thrust-to-weight and propellent efficiency, respectively,” said Maj Nathan Greiner, DRACO program manager.

Nuclear thermal propulsion “has the potential to achieve high thrust-to-weight ratios similar to in-space chemical propulsion and approach the high propellent efficiency of electric systems,” he said.

The first phase of the program will last 18 months and will focus on General Atomics’ reactor and propulsion subsystem concepts. In the second phase, Blue Origin and Lockheed Martin will independently develop spacecraft concept designs.

Brent Sherwood, senior vice president of advanced development programs at Blue Origin, said in a statement to SpaceNews that Blue Origin is “excited to support DARPA in maturing spacecraft concepts for this important technology area.”

Bill Pratt, manager of human exploration advanced programs at Lockheed Martin Space, said nuclear thermal propulsion is a “transformative technology that will dramatically change the way spacecraft will operate, increasing agility and allowing more efficient travel to Mars and beyond in far less time than conventional propulsion systems.”

Pratt said in a statement that the company will leverage work done on nuclear propulsion in previous decades “as we combine it with digital engineering, modern spacecraft design and creativity to advance this new capability.”
 

JacopCooper

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Dont think this was posted here. https://spacenews.com/darpa-selects...velop-spacecraft-for-nuclear-propulsion-demo/

"WASHINGTON — The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency selected Blue Origin and Lockheed Martin to develop competing spacecraft concepts for a demonstration of nuclear thermal propulsion, the agency announced April 12.

Under a program called DRACO, short for demonstration rocket for agile cislunar operations, DARPA wants to demonstrate nuclear thermal propulsion technology — using a nuclear reactor to heat up rocket fuel to generate thrust.

DARPA awarded General Atomics a $22 million contract to develop the nuclear reactor. Lockheed Martin’s contract value is $2.9 million and the Blue Origin’s is $2.5 million.

The goal of the program is to launch a spacecraft driven by nuclear thermal propulsion above low Earth orbit in 2025. DARPA believes this technology will allow spacecraft to travel huge distances quickly.

“Rapid maneuver in the space domain has traditionally been challenging because current electric and chemical space propulsion systems have drawbacks in thrust-to-weight and propellent efficiency, respectively,” said Maj Nathan Greiner, DRACO program manager.

Nuclear thermal propulsion “has the potential to achieve high thrust-to-weight ratios similar to in-space chemical propulsion and approach the high propellent efficiency of electric systems,” he said.

The first phase of the program will last 18 months and will focus on General Atomics’ reactor and propulsion subsystem concepts. In the second phase, Blue Origin and Lockheed Martin will independently develop spacecraft concept designs.

Brent Sherwood, senior vice president of advanced development programs at Blue Origin, said in a statement to SpaceNews that Blue Origin is “excited to support DARPA in maturing spacecraft concepts for this important technology area.”

Bill Pratt, manager of human exploration advanced programs at Lockheed Martin Space, said nuclear thermal propulsion is a “transformative technology that will dramatically change the way spacecraft will operate, increasing agility and allowing more efficient travel to Mars and beyond in far less time than conventional propulsion systems.”

Pratt said in a statement that the company will leverage work done on nuclear propulsion in previous decades “as we combine it with digital engineering, modern spacecraft design and creativity to advance this new capability.”
I think that this concept should be created a long time ago, and I'm glad that we'll see this spacecraft soon. It's time to take an advantage of nuclear power in space exploration.
 

sferrin

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I found these two illustrations (credited to Lockheed) in

Rockets and Spacecraft of the World
By Michael Chester
W. W. Norton & Co. Inc. 1964

From the book
The development of advanced propulsion systems is concentrated mainly in nuclear reactor engines at the present time. The Nerva is a rocket engine being manufactured for use with a nuclear reactor. The entire nuclear power system will be flight tested by RIFT vehicle. RIFT will be boosted into space by the Saturn C5.

The Nerva engine is destined to be part of a nuclear spacecraft called Rover. Rover is to be boosted into space in the late 1960s by advanced Saturn or Nova rockets.
I'll bet I checked that book out 40 times in elementary school. :D

(Just grabbed a copy at $5 on Amazon.)
 
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publiusr

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I have wondered about jacketed thrust. Having a “cooler” exhaust tube serve as the combustion chamber/nozzle for a much hotter exhaust that the physical nozzle itself cannot handle…
 

Grey Havoc

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Via the website of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory:

 

tequilashooter

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A new solicitation from the Defense Innovation Unit seeks “mature commercial technologies that can provide power and propulsion in the near term"
WASHINGTON — The Defense Innovation Unit last week issued a call for bids for small nuclear-powered engines for space missions beyond Earth orbit.

DoD wants “lightweight, portable and long-duration power sources that can support propulsion and on-station power for sensing and communication on small- and medium-sized spacecraft,” says the solicitation.

DIU says electric and solar-based propulsion systems are not suitable for missions beyond Earth orbit and are too bulky for use on modern commercial spacecraft. “Advanced propulsion technology that enables high delta-V and electrical power to payloads, while maintaining fuel efficiency, is required to enable new DoD mission sets in space.”

Submissions are due Sept. 23. DIU could award contracts within 60 to 90 days. These will be “Other Transaction” contracts for laboratory-based prototype testing. Under OT awards, companies and the government agree to invest in the project.

Bidders have to show “credible manufacturing, regulatory, and licensing paths toward prototype development within three to five years and a follow-on path to flight based testing.”

NASA and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency currently are funding the development of fission-based propulsion and power such as nuclear thermal propulsion technology.

DIU says it is not duplicating existing programs but is seeking to support current government projects with “mature commercial technologies that can provide power and propulsion in the near term.”

Making sure that these systems are safe is another concern. DIU wants systems that “minimize radiation exposure to ground personnel during spacecraft integration and radiation exposure on surrounding electronic components.”
 

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