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NA NAC-100 Centuryliner

Jemiba

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Intended as a short-haul airliner to compete with the Boeing 737, the DC 9, the Fokker F70
and others, the NA C-100 Centuryliner would have been powered by to P&W JTF10A-6 and
fitted with between 60 and 66 seats in a four-abreast seating.

(from Flying Review 1/65)
 

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Jemiba

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.. and some artist impressions from Aviation Week 9/1965 :
 

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circle-5

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Many years after abandoning the NAC-100 project, NAA (then Rockwell) revived its airframe for this seldom-seen AEW project. Does anybody know the NA- (or NR-) number and the year of this study? Many thanks...
 

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overscan (PaulMM)

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According to an article in Interavia, 1982 NAC-100 turned into the General Aircraft Coporation GAC-100, then the Commuter Aircraft CAC-100.

It originally started as a Douglas design for a DC- 3 replacement which was taken over by North American and designated NAC-100. In 1968, the design was acquired by the General Aircraft Corporation (GAC) headed by Dr. Lynn Bollinger, former President of STOL aircraft manufacturer Helio.

Fuselage looks similar, but the GAC-100 has 4 turboprops, not 2 turbojets.

Not sure if this helps any ;)
 

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Skybolt

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Rockwel (nèe NAA) participated in the studies on contract with NASA for short haul aircrafts in the early-to-mid '70s, STOL and VTOL. Search the NTRS for report "CONCEPTUAL DESIGN STUDY OF A V/STOL LIFT FAN COMMERCIAL SHORT HAUL TRANSPORT". No designation assigned, in the report at least. In my opinion, NAC-100 was a "marketing" designation, like L-2000 or B-2707.
 

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It originally started as a Douglas design for a DC- 3 replacement which was taken over by North American and designated NAC-100. In 1968, the design was acquired by the General Aircraft Corporation (GAC) headed by Dr. Lynn Bollinger, former President of STOL aircraft manufacturer Helio.

Fascinating. If the design was "taken over by North American and designated NAC-100", does Interavia indicate who initially came up with it? Attached are a couple of pictures of a GAC-100 model in USAF colors.
 

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overscan (PaulMM)

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Douglas (read quote again). While fuselage is quite similar, wings are different on the GAC-100.
 

hesham

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overscan said:
According to an article in Interavia, 1982 NAC-100 turned into the General Aircraft Coporation GAC-100, then the Commuter Aircraft CAC-100.

It originally started as a Douglas design for a DC- 3 replacement which was taken over by North American and designated NAC-100. In 1968, the design was acquired by the General Aircraft Corporation (GAC) headed by Dr. Lynn Bollinger, former President of STOL aircraft manufacturer Helio.

Fuselage looks similar, but the GAC-100 has 4 turboprops, not 2 turbojets.

Not sure if this helps any ;)

My dear Overscan,

I think it is not true,and see its story in FLIGHTGLOBAL;
http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1968/1968%20-%202730.html
 

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While there are visual similarities between the NAC-100 and the GAC-100, I believe the GAC-100 was a considerably smaller, commuter aircraft: note passenger capacity listed at 32 seats, vs. 60 for the Centuryliner. In addition, the GAC-100 has a circular fuselage cross-section, while the NAC-100 has slight twin-lobe configuration. Could Interavia be mistaken? And if so, was Douglas really behind the NAC-100?
 

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Factory model of North American Aviation NAC-100 Centuryliner.
 

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Stargazer2006

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An article about the Commuter Aircraft Corp. CAC-100 (formerly GAC-100) from Air International dated September 1981:
 

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Mark Nankivil

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Love the models - the NAC-100 is quite sharp looking!

Thanks for sharing the model photos - really appreciate it!

Enjoy the Day! Mark
 

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Here is a Centuryliner that I recently found in an antique shop in California. I had no idea what it was until circle-5 identified it.

[Links now dead - Admin]
 
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Many years ago, a friend, knowing my interest in aerospace history, gave me a set of photographic slides used in marketing several North American projects to airlines. This probably saved them from the round file after Rockwell lost interest in that market. Although mounted in metal holders and carried in heavy plastic protective pages for 3-ring binders, upon examination they show their wear. I apologize for the "dirty" condition of the following images, but knowing how often what used to be the North American Aviation division of Rockwell moved about until they were acquired by Boeing, I would be surprised if the original artwork survives. The portion of the set showing V/STOL designs will be posted under a different topic.
 

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JimK

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Here are several more images from the slide set on the NAC-100. There are many more slides showing performance charts and economic projections. These show alternate interior arrangements, possible uses for a military version, and a four-engined version.
 

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