Mystery Iraqi Ballistic Missile and Launcher

natewillcome4you

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On the bottom right hand corner of this page is a ballistic missile project I am unfamilliar with. In addition, there appears to be a mobile launcher for the Al-Samoud based on the SA-2 missile launcher, perhaps similar to the one shown here
Any information would be much appreciated!
 

natewillcome4you

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I can't identify the truck used to make the system mobile, and the closest thing I've seen to it is a north korean system.
In addition, I have seen no other good documentation regarding the Al-Samoud I srbm, so any links would be appreciated.
 

Eagle2009

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Well the Wikipedia article does a half-decent job of describing the weapon system:

It's the Al-Fat'h SRBM, effectively a solid-fuel powered counterpart to the Al-Samoud SRBMs (which were liquid-fueled, using recycled S-75 SAM engines). It was primarily unguided, like the Soviet Luna but a guided version was in work and paraded at seen in that famous image. Per the UN report after the war, the Ababil-100 name (used 2 separate times by Iraq) was the missile's name before 1999, after which it became the Al-Fat'h/Fatah.

The choice of a S-75 launch rail is interesting in that at the same time this was being developed, Iran was doing the same with the early Fateh-110 SRBMs.

Here is another page that talks about the weapon in more detail, including detailed imagery of it. The motor images are from UN reports published after the 2003 Iraq War:


This article from the same author talks about Iraq's abandoned multi-national Badr-2000 MRBM and what he calls the "Junior" model, the missile discussed above.

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Should be noted the Al-Samoud SRBMs are unrelated to the image you posted, beside the basic fact it was designed for similar range but with the quick-firing advantage of solid-fuel propulsion.

The same author has a great article on the Al-Samoud, including the fact it was originally "skinnier" and was widened and that was the missile that was talked about so much before the 2003 invasion.



THere is an entire UN report on what they learned about ALL of Iraq's various missile projects prior to 2003, which is where the author the articles above got much of his material but the report has MUCH more details. It's a bit too big to post here I think but I can pull details as requested.
 
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Coiler

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THere is an entire UN report on what they learned about ALL of Iraq's various missile projects prior to 2003, which is where the author the articles above got much of his material but the report has MUCH more details. It's a bit too big to post here I think but I can pull details as requested.

Do you have a link?
 

natewillcome4you

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Should be noted the Al-Samoud SRBMs are unrelated to the image you posted
My bad, meant to say ababil. Thanks for the clarification regarding the 1999 name change, I was stumped by the references to “al-fatah” and my best guess was that it was the guided version.
 

NMaude

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the Al-Samoud SRBMs (which were liquid-fueled, using recycled S-75 SAM engines).
S-75? I suppose you're referring to the SA-2 Guideline SAM?

On another note is there a thread for the SA-2 Guideline because I can't find one?
 

Eagle2009

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the Al-Samoud SRBMs (which were liquid-fueled, using recycled S-75 SAM engines).
S-75? I suppose you're referring to the SA-2 Guideline SAM?

On another note is there a thread for the SA-2 Guideline because I can't find one?
Yes, being as the S-75 is the more proper Russian/Soviet name for the system. Not sure on the second question, would be surprising if there wasn't one somewhere.
 

Eagle2009

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THere is an entire UN report on what they learned about ALL of Iraq's various missile projects prior to 2003, which is where the author the articles above got much of his material but the report has MUCH more details. It's a bit too big to post here I think but I can pull details as requested.

Do you have a link?
I've been trying to find a full copy of the report but no luck.

It was prepared by the UNMOVIC but all the pages I find are effectively just meeting minutes between the UNMOVIC and the UNSC.

I personally have a copy of Chapter IV, which focuses solely on Iraq's various missile programs but it's too big to post here.

I downloaded it years ago and can't recall from where, unfortunately.
 

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