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Morane Saulnier Statodyne Projects

cluttonfred

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Random thought....

Have there been any designs for jet VTOL tailsitters, on paper or actually built, with the engine reversed in the airframe and the efflux turned 180 degrees or so to exit from the nose? It's not hard to imagine such a design with a pair of Harrier-style rotating louvers for pitch and role control and perhaps a couple of small vanes to divert the efflux for yaw control, or perhaps four rotating louvers to do all four. You would think that there would be advantages in terms of reduced ground interaction effects and increased "pendulum" stability from hanging the aircraft by the nose, so to speak. Examples? Thoughts?

Cheers,

Matthew
 

robunos

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Examples?
Try the Morane-Saulnier 'Statodynes'.
There's an excellent article in 'Air Enthusiast' 103, January/February 2003, pp.24-8.
See below for a taster...


cheers,
Robin.
 

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cluttonfred

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Thanks, Robin. It appears from what I can find on the net that the Statodyne was a twin-engine design with one engine exhausting out the tail, conventionally, and the other exhausting out of the dorsal and ventral nozzles just aft of the cockpit. I was thinking of a design with all the thrust coming from such forward nozzles, perhaps even in front of the cockpit, and none from the tail. But this is close, thanks!
 

Jemiba

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Clinging to those Statodyne designs made by Georges Caillette, maybe the
type E.5 comes closer, as it wouldn't have had a rear nozzle, but only the
annular shaped front one. The type was intended as a trainer aircraft for
exercising take-off and especially landing of a tailsitter, so the rear nozzle,
principally wasn't regarded as necessary.
 

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cluttonfred

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Neat! Was it intended to be a ducted fan powered by a turboshaft, a turbofan with a really big first turbine, or some other powerplant?
 

martinbayer

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Matthew,

while such an installation could indeed offer decreased ground impact of the exhaust, the idea of increasing stability is a fallacy, since a mechanical analogy for a thrust vector of a jet or rocket nozzle is more like pushing (or pulling) a stick gripped on a firm handle rather than one balanced on (or dangling from) a finger. A related discussion for rocket engines, which also applies to airbreathing jets, is given here:

http://unreasonablerocket.blogspot.com/2007/11/most-common-misconception.html

Martin
 

Jemiba

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Mole said:
Neat! Was it intended to be a ducted fan powered by a turboshaft, a turbofan with a really big first turbine, or some other powerplant?
Powerplant is said to have been a Bristol Orpheus or a SNECMA ATAR, coupled with a “Volant-turbine libre”, which
I think was a counter rotating free wheel to counter gyrscopic effects.
 

hesham

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Stargazer2006

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Very nice set of projects.

For some reason I was certain we already had a topic on the Statodyne, but couldn't find any.

We have these two mentions with pictures though:
  • http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,12205.msg119249.html#msg119249
  • http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,2140.msg95718.html#msg95718
 

hesham

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Yes Stargazer,


I used the search and found those topics,but here,they are collected.
 

visvirtusvoluntas

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What a crazy idea that opposite turbojet with inverted flow...
Very interesting, however. A usual!
 

Jemiba

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Have merged the two topics actually dealing with the Statodyne (the MS.1001 was just one design,
that's why I not used that designation in the title) concept and will try to add some additional information:
The concept was based on patents filed by Georges Caillette during the 1950s, when the tailsitter concept
was still favored for VTOL. Stability in the vertical attitude was achieved by positioning the centre of gravity
behind the centre of thrust (CT), keeping the aircraft in a vertical hover stable in the same manner, as an
inverted U-shaped perpendicular can be balanced on the fingertip. In all winged Statodyne designs, the aero-
dynamic center (CL) was positioned behind the centre of gravity. So transition to horizontal flight would be
achieved automatically with increasing airspeed, as aerodynamic lift increases and the aircraft would be
brought to a horizontal attitude. Another feature of several Statodyne designs was the installation of two engines
with their inlets face-to-face, the lower engine with the nozzle in a conventional way at the rear of the fuselage, but
the other exhausting via bifurcated or mushroom-shaped jet pipes at the forward fuselage. Although requiring
quite complicated inlet and exhaust ducts, this arrangement offered the benefit of compensating gyroscopic
effects and the possibility to shift the centre of thrust by individual power settings for the two engines.
Two layouts from the mentioned patents are shown below.
 

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Jemiba

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Amongst the proposals, that should lead to a service type, were the Statodyne B, as an unmanned proof-of-concept demonstrator,
and the manned E-designs, as experimental/test aircraft, or later trainer.
 

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hesham

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Great drawings my dear Jemiba,


and welcome your return.
 

Jemiba

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Main aim was the development of a single seat VTOL interceptor, which was designated MS.1001
Besides the relatively conventional layout with two wings and fins, three and four winged versions
were proposed (the one with four cruciform wings isn't shown in the sources known to me, so the
sketch is just conjectured).
 

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Stargazer2006

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Once again Jens, you make an invaluable contribution. Thanks a lot for this!
 

Jemiba

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Besides the interceptor type, statodyne concept was proposed to be used for a kind of a
flying jeep, too, a drawing that appeared in several publications, seem to show a kind of
a test vehicle, two others are shown in Henri Lacazes new book "Morane Saulnier - Ses
Avions, Ses Projets".
Another project for an interceptor, although numbered amongst the Statodyne designs,
is to my opinion only related on the edge of that principle. It's the "Staodyne F" rocket
powered interceptor, may be a later relative to designs as the Bachem Natter. There are
drawings floating around, said to be manufacturers drawings, showing it with the pilot in
prone position, or better standing in the small gondola. This aircraft should have been
launched with the help of solid fueled booster rockets and probably landed on its belly,
so the prone position seems not very useful to me. Comments welcome !
 

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Jemiba

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And as line drawings may be boring sometimes, I'll add some colour to this subject: ;)
Purely What-If, of course !
Some years ago, I've tried to put the whole story, as far as it was known then (still without
the additions made by Henri Lacazes book) into a summary. Those interested feel free to
PM me (with mail adress), I'll send the file, about 2 MB then via email.
 

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