Lockheed ADP/NASA Langley 1990 Mach 4 - Mach 5 methane fueled aircraft studies

flateric

ACCESS: Above Top Secret
Staff member
Top Contributor
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 2, 2006
Messages
9,542
Reaction score
2,726
AlAA 90-2151
Airframe/Propulsion Integration of Supersonic Cruise Vehicles
J. Anderson
Lockheed Advanced Development Projects
Burbank, CA

"...A system performance study was conducted by the Lockheed Advanced Development Projects (ADP) organization under a subcontract to Pratt & Whitney in support of the Air Force Enhanced Flow Compressor contract. This study investigated the system performance, impacts of the inlet/lengine match and the implications of engine flow scheduling vs Mach number.
The baseline aircraft used in the study was a derivative of the Mach 5 methane fueled cruise vehicle developed in a joint effort between ADP and NASA Langley - (pics 3 and 4 - Flateric). The derivative aircraft was a Mach 4, JP fueled aircraft. Both aircraft were designed for long range cruise at their respective design Mach numbers. The baseline aircraft was configured with propulsion
nacelles located on the wings. For this study, these nacelles were removed from the aircraft design and replaced with the various new inletlengine combinations being studied."
 

Attachments

  • ADP-1990-SCV-1.jpg
    ADP-1990-SCV-1.jpg
    31.4 KB · Views: 687
  • ADP-1990-SCV-2.jpg
    ADP-1990-SCV-2.jpg
    32.5 KB · Views: 657
  • Lockheed 89 EF M4-5 penetrator-1.JPG
    Lockheed 89 EF M4-5 penetrator-1.JPG
    42.4 KB · Views: 654
  • Lockheed 89 EF M4-5 penetrator-2.JPG
    Lockheed 89 EF M4-5 penetrator-2.JPG
    72.9 KB · Views: 632

hesham

ACCESS: USAP
Senior Member
Joined
May 26, 2006
Messages
29,186
Reaction score
7,153
Hi,

here is the Lockheed hypersonic,they called
it Mach 7.

http://books.google.com.eg/books?id=y-QDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA71&dq=Mach+5+aircraft&hl=ar&ei=dTxATPHYFMuK4QaB8q2nDg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=16&ved=0CHMQ6AEwDw#v=onepage&q=Mach%205%20aircraft&f=true
 

Attachments

  • 1.JPG
    1.JPG
    19.6 KB · Views: 385

dannydale

ACCESS: Top Secret
Joined
May 13, 2007
Messages
547
Reaction score
383
I think it was just listing the speed of the different vehicles, and this one got the 'Mach 7' label. Some of them also look a bit fanciful, like the Akula (I think) submarine's long tail and the weird hydroplane boat. Others like Thrust 2 look nearly dead-on. I was also wondering about the glowing leading edges on Mr. Lockheed Mach 7 in light of the mountains in the background implying he's flying in the dense lower atmosphere. I think an object going M7 at STP would give off intense blue-white or even violet-white light just like an arc welder.

Bravissimo for finding a view of Mr Lockheed's belly. That ranks up there with the various FDL and waverider hypersonics as my favorite unbuilt designs.
 

Colonial-Marine

Fighting the UAV mafia.
Joined
Oct 5, 2009
Messages
880
Reaction score
255
Excuse my ignorance, but why methane? I know it has been looked at for powering more conventional aircraft as well as rockets, but what makes it applicable to a Mach 4+ design?
 

Orionblamblam

ACCESS: Above Top Secret
Top Contributor
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 5, 2006
Messages
9,873
Reaction score
5,334
Website
www.aerospaceprojectsreview.com
Colonial-Marine said:
Excuse my ignorance, but why methane? I know it has been looked at for powering more conventional aircraft as well as rockets, but what makes it applicable to a Mach 4+ design?

1) It's cold. Useful for cooling an aircraft at those speeds.
2) It combusts faster than regualr jet fuel (important when dealing with speeds that put air through engines in *milliseconds*
3) It has more energy per unit mass than regular jet fuel.
4) It's denser than hydrogen.
5) It can be manufactured easily, unlike jet fuel.
6) There's lots of it underground.

Main negative of methane is that it's substantially less dense than regualr jet fuel, and is more difficult to handle.
 

dannydale

ACCESS: Top Secret
Joined
May 13, 2007
Messages
547
Reaction score
383
Hay guise! I found something that looks suspiciously like an engine nacelle from this beast!

http://crgis.ndc.nasa.gov/historic/File:1982_Mach_5_Nacelle_Multiple_Expansion_Ramp_Nozzles.jpg
 

Attachments

  • 1982_Mach_5_Nacelle_Multiple_Expansion_Ramp_Nozzles.jpg
    1982_Mach_5_Nacelle_Multiple_Expansion_Ramp_Nozzles.jpg
    100.9 KB · Views: 396

DSE

ACCESS: Secret
Joined
Apr 13, 2010
Messages
461
Reaction score
30
Orionblamblam said:
Main negative of methane is that it's substantially less dense than regualr jet fuel, and is more difficult to handle.


Another not so nice property is it's tendency to detonate more easily than say H2.
 

shockonlip

ACCESS: Top Secret
Joined
Jan 29, 2008
Messages
605
Reaction score
20
dannydale said:
Hay guise! I found something that looks suspiciously like an engine nacelle from this beast!
...

Yes, there are a fair number of papers on this study whose titles are unclassified, but the body
of the paper is still secret.

There are also a few papers that are actually published and available via AIAA.

If you want to get excited and then frustrated:
http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,10338.msg97434.html#msg97434

Regards.
 

shockonlip

ACCESS: Top Secret
Joined
Jan 29, 2008
Messages
605
Reaction score
20
By the way.

The ISABE paper that can be found via the previous link is available via the
ISABE proceedings.

I have a copy. Interesting paper!

The 2-D inlet did not perform as well. A vortex instability on the sidewall from what I
recall. But the axisymmetric inlet did better (see flateric's 2 pix at the start of this
thread).

Also, the design called for the ramjet to cold-flow until it was needed.
I found this very interesting.
 

Mr London 24/7

ACCESS: Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2008
Messages
406
Reaction score
101
dannydale said:
Hay guise! I found something that looks suspiciously like an engine nacelle from this beast!

http://crgis.ndc.nasa.gov/historic/File:1982_Mach_5_Nacelle_Multiple_Expansion_Ramp_Nozzles.jpg

I previously missed this: nice find - I'm sure there is a .pdf on DTIC or NTRS covering Wind Tunnel testing of (what seemed very likely to have been) this Inlet (but it may not have been specifically identified as such)....
 

publiusr

The Anti-Proxmire
Joined
Sep 24, 2011
Messages
1,108
Reaction score
537
With the ever increasing push of methane in rocketry...Lockmart might want to revisit this concept. Now I wonder if a tripropellant approach might yield a spaceplane at last...methalox rocket for an upper stage...perhaps with ammonia-to-hydrogen tech mixed in for a Star Raker type first stage?
 

Vahe Demirjian

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Mar 1, 2013
Messages
820
Reaction score
498
AlAA 90-2151
Airframe/Propulsion Integration of Supersonic Cruise Vehicles
J. Anderson
Lockheed Advanced Development Projects
Burbank, CA

"...A system performance study was conducted by the Lockheed Advanced Development Projects (ADP) organization under a subcontract to Pratt & Whitney in support of the Air Force Enhanced Flow Compressor contract. This study investigated the system performance, impacts of the inlet/lengine match and the implications of engine flow scheduling vs Mach number.
The baseline aircraft used in the study was a derivative of the Mach 5 methane fueled cruise vehicle developed in a joint effort between ADP and NASA Langley - (pics 3 and 4 - Flateric). The derivative aircraft was a Mach 4, JP fueled aircraft. Both aircraft were designed for long range cruise at their respective design Mach numbers. The baseline aircraft was configured with propulsion
nacelles located on the wings. For this study, these nacelles were removed from the aircraft design and replaced with the various new inletlengine combinations being studied."
The artist's renderings predate the 1990 system performance study by Lockheed and NASA Langley, and since they appear on pages 51 and 91 of the book An Illustrated Guide to Future Fighters and Combat Aircraft (published in 1984), the aircraft designs in these artist's rendering were apparently conceived in 1982-1984 judging from the fact that a Lockheed company cutaway view of the turboramjet for the Mach 5 Lockheed design powered by methane-burning variable cycle turboramjets (see reply #8 above) is dated 1982.
 
Top