L50 MACREUSE : AFTER-WAR FRENCH EXPERIMENTAL GLIDE TORPEDO.

klem

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Following the example of its allies, France was interested in German prototypes, and for this reason, during the second half of 1945, a Groupement d'Aéronautique Navale (G.A.N.E.S) was created in Hechingen, Germany, for the experimentation of special devices and remotely piloted bombs recovered in Germany. In December 1944, this test section of the Commission d'études pratiques d'aéronautique (CEPA), became squadron 10 S, intended for the special tests undertaken by the G.A.N.E.S on torpedoes.
The French navy, not wanting to be left behind in the Allied rush for German spoils, organized an inspection commission of captured German military companies, so that by the end of 1945, France was able to get its hands on this technology and its engineers.
After examining these recovered machines, the French Navy came up with the L50 MACREUSE, which was built in Saint Tropez. A simple configuration the body of the machine is none other than a German torpedo F5 and a delta wing, equipped with an automatic pilot taken from the V1, this one was to be released from an altitude of 2 km and continues its trajectory on approximately 15 km and release the torpedo. 60 of these torpedoes were launched from 46 to 47. It turned out that the program in general was not satisfactory.
However, these after-war French attempts to use recovered German advances were also aimed at another vision, that of testing and mastering these new technological approaches born across the Rhine by French specialists.
 

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Dilandu

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Very interesting! Hm, I wonder where they put the autopilot? Or they replaced a torpedo gyro with V-1 control system (after all, it could handle the rudder jn water also)?
 

Dilandu

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However, these after-war French attempts to use recovered German advances were also aimed at another vision, that of testing and mastering these new technological approaches born across the Rhine by French specialists.
Here they sucseeded without question; France is one of a very small list of countries that could produce any type of modern military equipment.
 

Archibald

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Never heard about this one before.


Typically french (navy) name : a marine bird (which makes some sense) but also a piece of beef meat. :D

More seriously: must have been an ancestor of that peculiar weapon.

 

Archibald

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However, these after-war French attempts to use recovered German advances were also aimed at another vision, that of testing and mastering these new technological approaches born across the Rhine by French specialists.
Here they sucseeded without question; France is one of a very small list of countries that could produce any type of modern military equipment.

Yep, but the beginnings were very humble. And the testing of these German weapons was... epic, at time. Le Fana de l'aviation a long time ago had an article related to the French post-war Ju-88s that flight tested and dropped them. Notably the early "guided" bombs... the pilots were up for some nasty suprises.

One of the most absurd, baffling stories related to a big-gunned Ju-88 at a base in North Africa. They were to test the gun first on the ground, at a target range, and the aircraft of course was a tail-dragger with the gun in the nose at a... certain angle.
Somebody missed that fact and put the target a bit too low. Fired was the gun, luckily just one shell... which graciously flew over the target in an arcing trajectory... "landing" a couple of kilometers farther. Some people there got an explosive surprise, fortunately nobody was hurt.
 

klem

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In 1946, the L50 Macreuse gliding torpedo was registered at the Chalais-Meudon-Onera wind tunnel: (Schwartzland Flugzeugbau-L50-Torpedo ) and not La Marine Nationale knowing that it was a project managed by it. Some opinions on this subject ? L.jpg
 
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