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JGSDF Type 23 (provisional designation) Surface to Surface Missile

Grey Havoc

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http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/0003148480

From the sound of things it's going to be an Anti-Ship / Anti-Invasion (stand off fire support) missile for outer island defence.

New missile eyed to guard Senkaku isles

8:29 pm, August 14, 2016



The Yomiuri Shimbun

The government intends to develop a new surface-to-ship missile for reinforcing the defense of remote islands, including the Senkaku Islands in Okinawa Prefecture, The Yomiuri Shimbun has learned.

The government aims to deploy the missile, which will have a maximum range of 300 kilometers, on Miyakojima and other major islands of the Sakishima islands. This will put the territorial waters around the Senkaku Islands within its range.

Funding for the development will be included in the Defense Ministry’s initial budget requests for fiscal 2017. The government aims to deploy the missiles around fiscal 2023.

China has repeatedly engaged in provocative actions around the Senkaku Islands, so the government aims to strengthen deterrence by reinforcing its capability for long-range attacks.

The new missile will be mounted on a vehicle, making it easy to transport and change positions. It will have a guidance system using the global positioning system (GPS) or other means, and be capable of striking targets, such as other countries’ warships deployed around remote islands, from nearby islands.

The National Defense Program Guideline, which was approved by the Cabinet in 2013, stipulates a policy of strengthening Japan’s capability to defend remote islands. Development of the new missile is part of these efforts.

The Senkaku Islands are about 170 kilometers from Ishigakijima island and Miyakojima island, where Ground Self-Defense Force units are scheduled to be stationed. The Senkaku Islands are also about 150 kilometers from Yonagunijima island, where a GSDF coastal monitoring unit was deployed in 2016.

The current surface-to-ship missile possessed by the GSDF, called the Type-12 Surface-to-Ship Missile, has a maximum range of just over 100 kilometers. Even if it is deployed on the islands, the current missile does not have sufficient capability to strike targets in territorial waters and contiguous zones around the Senkaku Islands.


Territorial waters are within 12 nautical miles (about 22 kilometers) from shore and contiguous zones are within 12 nautical miles from the territorial waters.

If the maximum range can be extended to 300 kilometers by developing the new missile, Japan will have sufficient capability to deter the approach of other countries’ warships toward territorial waters around the Senkaku Islands.

The new surface-to-ship missile would also be effective if a remote island is occupied.

When GSDF units conduct landing operations, they currently focus on naval gunfire from destroyers with a short firing range or dropping bombs from fighter jets. That involves a high risk of being counterattacked.

The new missile would make it possible to assist the GSDF landing units from nearby islands.

The government plans to develop the missile solely in Japan. It will use solid fuel, which requires advanced technology.

Solid fuel does not leak and is not volatile, making it possible to store the fuel for a long time. It is therefore harder to detect signs that missiles using such fuel will be fired, compared with missiles that use liquid fuel, which takes a long time to inject into the missiles.

The Defense Ministry expects the development of the new missile to boost the technological levels of domestic defense industries.
 

DrRansom

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Is Japan bound by mtcr(sp?). Any reason for the 300km range besides export potential? The US has allowed Korea to go over 300km.
 

TomS

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MTCR only applies to exports. Japan really isn't looking to sell complete weapon systems yet, so I'd assume the range is really driven by their own operational requirements.
 

lastdingo

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Without an OTH (over the horizon) radar or a network of ocean surveillance radar satellites you won't know where a ship is past 300 km. Loud convoys might be triangulates with SOSUS-like systems at even longer ranges, but warships not really.

So airborne radars will be needed, and 300 km is a sensible air/ground radar range.
13,000 m altitude offers about 470 km radar horizon, but detection at such ranges is very difficult with today's RCS reduced warships. SAR mode is typically published to be useful out to 300 km at most (except satellites, which operate very differently).

So one could assume that the Japanese think of the islands as protected by land-based SAM and some AEW&C or MPA plane flying in this umbrella of protection, detecting, tracking, classifying targets.

300 km is also a huge range in regard to cruise time. a warship may move more than 10 nm by the time a missile has flown this distance, and likely still more than 5 nm if it's a supersonic one. So midcourse updates make sense, and reliable datalink for those cannot be expected at 200+ km anyway.
So overall even a Mach 3 cruise missile would have a hard time finding warships at 500 km range reliably.


MTCR is about payloads of 500+ kg. Typical warheads against ship targets are about half that heavy.
 

Grey Havoc

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sferrin said:
Wonder if there's any relation to this:

Possible, but not likely I think. From what has been described of the new system so far, it appears to be an SRBM rather than an air-breathing missile.

DrRansom said:
Is Japan bound by mtcr(sp?). Any reason for the 300km range besides export potential? The US has allowed Korea to go over 300km.

IIRC, Japan used to use the MTCR as a semi-official benchmark to clearly differentiate offensive missile systems from defensive ones. That practise seems to have fallen into disuse in recent years, but they may have partly revived it in this case to emphasise the defensive nature of the Type 23.
 

Grey Havoc

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http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/760e5c60-6445-11e6-a08a-c7ac04ef00aa.html

Japan plans missile to test Chinese strategy in East China Sea

Leo Lewis and Kana Inagaki in Tokyo

bbc7ac49-648c-489d-b706-0c4b72dd66d3.img

Japan's new missile, with a 300km range, will be able to cover the waters around the Senkaku islands


Japan is planning to develop a new tactical ballistic missile that would reset Chinese military strategy around disputed islands in the East China Sea.

Plans for the surface-to-ship weapon, which would be the longest-range missile ever built by Japan, have emerged after prolonged months of rancour between Tokyo and Beijing over rival territorial claims.

As tensions have persisted, Japan revealed last month that it scrambled fighter jets a record 199 times in the second quarter as Chinese military activities intensified around Japan’s territorial waters and drew closer to the uninhabited Senkaku islands — a chain known as the Diaoyu in China.

The new missile, say military experts familiar with the plans, is designed to “complicate enemy planning”. By positioning them on Japanese islands in the East China Sea and with a range that stretches to the edge of Japan’s territorial claims, the missiles would discourage naval aggression. If an attacking force were planning a landing on a Japanese island, its commander would need to destroy the missiles beforehand — in effect initiating conflict.

Japan’s move to build the missiles comes as the country strengthens its internal capability to develop military equipment after Prime Minister Shinzo Abe ended the country’s self-imposed ban on the export of weapons in 2014. The programme is part of a wider effort to reduce spending on foreign-made weaponry if a domestic alternative can be produced.

The new vehicle-mounted, GPS-guided missile system is expected to be deployed to locations such as the southern island of Miyako in Okinawa, according to people familiar with the plan.

With a range of about 300km, the system will be able to cover the waters around the Senkakus. Experts say the current Type 12 surface-to-ship missiles, which Japan procured in 2012, have a range of roughly 200km.

The defence ministry said it was studying ways to enhance its existing surface-to-ship missile capability to deter invasion of Japan’s remote islands.

But it declined to comment on details after an August 14 report in the Yomiuri Shimbun newsppaper said the new missiles were expected to be deployed around 2023.

Industry watchers say the move to develop a new missile is no surprise given that the ministry’s defence guidelines released in 2013 called for Japan’s Self Defence Forces to strengthen their ability to deal with attacks on islands using aircraft, naval vessels and missiles.

The ministry is currently explaining to local municipalities in Miyako and Ishigaki islands in Okinawa and Amami island of Kagoshima in southern Japan about its plan to deploy its surface-to-ship guided-missile units.

It is expected to seek funding for development of the new missile in its initial budget requests for the 2017-18 fiscal year, to be submitted later this month.

Governments in the Asia-Pacific region are closely scrutinising Japan’s military posture following this month’s appointment of Tomomi Inada as the country’s defence minister. The outspoken nationalist, who returned on Wednesday from a visit to a Japanese military base in Djibouti, has previously expressed a hardline position on Japan’s territorial rights in the East China Sea.
 

TomS

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I notice that they only refer to GPS guidance but also talk about this as an anti-ship weapon. GPS alone isn't likely to be good enough to hit moving targets at sea at that range. Is there an as-yet-unmentioned seeker as well, or do we anticipate something like AMSTE, where the GPS-guided weapon gets continuous target location updates from an off-board radar?
 

Hood

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Might be just a journalistic error, after all the first line calls the missile a "tactical ballistic missile". ::)
 

TomS

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Hood said:
Might be just a journalistic error, after all the first line calls the missile a "tactical ballistic missile". ::)

Based on Grey Havoc's post, that isn't necessarily an error.

There's been some recent interest in anti-ship ballistic missiles (see China's DF-21d). This clearly isn't in the same class as DF-21d, but I can see Japan wanting to look at ballistic rather than air-breathing trajectories, especially if they think that the PLAN's TBMD capabilities are lagging their air defense capabilities.
 

collins355

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I note the wikipedia entry for the Type-12 SSM says this:

In 2015, an upgrade of the Type 88 became operational called the Type 12. The Type 12 features INS with mid-course GPS guidance and better precision due to enhanced contour/terrain matching and target discrimination capabilities. The weapon is networked, where initial and mid-course targeting can be provided by other platforms, and also boasts shorter reload times, reduced lifecycle costs, and a range of 124 mi (108 nmi; 200 km).[2][3
 

TomS

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Yes? SSM-1 (Type 88 or Type 12) is a liquid-fueled air-breathing missile. If the new missile is solid-fuel as reported, it's not related.
 

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