Japanese Nippon H2-A satellite launcher concepts

hesham

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Hi,

http://www.flightglobal.com/pdfarchive/view/1996/1996%20-%202462.html?search=NIPPON%20H2-A
 

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Michel Van

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the upgrade from H-2
the H-2 was Develop with only Japanese space technology.
it's LE-7 Lox/LH2 engine a copy of SSME, became a nightmare for NASDA (JAXA)
the engine fail during burn test in one case a worker died in an accidental explosion.
in 1994 the LE-7 was declared ready for H-2
from 1994 to 1999 NASDA launch 8 H-2 but not with expected success:

hampered by constraints of laborunion Japanese Fishermen to launch only 4x H-2 per year
too expensive compared to international competitors like Ariane.
too complex technology to handle, the last 2 H-2 launch were failures because LE-7
so decision for H-2A was made: redesigned to improve reliability and minimize costs.

the Solid Booster replace smaller better compatible for Mission
SRB-A 2-4 from Nissan but smaller as SRB from H-2
and additional
SSB 2-4 Castor 4AXL as Solid strap-on Boosters

The LE-7A is an upgraded model from the problematic LE-7 engine
reducing or the amount of required welding, Wat was its Achilles heel
redesigned fuel inducer and his turbopump.
new designed engine nozzle

first launch H-2A happens on 29 August 2001
again hampered by constraints of laborunion Japanese Fishermen to launch only 4x H-2 per year
on 23 November 2003 launch F6 is failure, one of SRB-A not separate from corestage
it take almost 2 years to fix the problem with SRB holders

Original was planned H-2A with 2 liquid Booster on base of Corestage but with 2 LE-7 engine
this plans were abandoned in favored for H-2B
with increase diameter from 4 to 5,2 meter and 2 LE-7 engine
the H-2B first launch was the HTV to ISS.
 

blackstar

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I think the goal with the H-2B is to bring the cost down. This is an expensive rocket for them.
 

Grey Havoc

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On a side note, the third H2-B is due to be launched this Friday night (11:18 a.m Saturday morning, July 21st, Japan Standard Time):
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T120718004262.htm

Payload is a Kounotori [HTV] resupply vehicle (Kounotori-3) bound for the ISS.
 

Grey Havoc

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http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T120721002739.htm

The H-2B, which is designed to be launched once a year, is 56.6 meters high and weighs 531 tons, making it the largest rocket in the history of Japanese space development.

The cargo vehicle, weighing in at 4.6 tons, is carrying such supplies as food and other daily necessities, a water tank for feeding killifish and a device for releasing small satellites into space, the space exploration agency said.

The H-2B was jointly developed by JAXA and Mitsubishi Heavy for the purpose of carrying the Kounotori, which has a payload capacity of 16.5 tons. The rocket is twice as effective as H-2A rockets at launching satellites into orbit, JAXA said.

JAXA plans to develop a "homing version" of the Kounotori that will be used to return ISS equipment to Earth, JAXA officials said.

Like the H-2A, the country's mainstay rocket, the H-2B's first and second components are propelled through the reaction of liquefied hydrogen and liquefied oxygen.

Following the decommissioning last year of U.S. space shuttles, the Kounotori has been gaining international attention as a means of transporting large payloads into space, JAXA said.

The successful launch of an H-2B rocket Saturday boosted the combined success rate of H-2A and H-2B rockets to 95.8 percent, indicating the nation's satellite launch technology is now set to take off.

Future launches of the domestically produced rockets will be handled by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., the rockets' manufacturer, as opposed to previous launches managed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. The nation is now set to become a major player in the field of commercial satellite launches.

With a current lineup of its core H-2A product and the latest H-2B, MHI will aim to win orders for commercial launches of foreign satellites. However, competition is tough in the market, particularly with foreign rivals....


....So far, MHI has won only one order, to launch a South Korean satellite with the H-2A rocket in May. The company still mainly relies on the Japanese government for launch orders....
 

Archibald

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Something that puzzle me in the history of space flight is the switch to LOX/LH2 engines in the 70's - LE-7 and Vulcain, SSME and RS-68 later. Without blaming the shuttle for everything-that-gone-wrong-with-the-space-program, was the SSME the reason for that ?
I mean, LH2 is good for upper stages, but unless you have the Aerojet M-1, kerosene sounds better for first stages.
 

Michel Van

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Archibald said:
Something that puzzle me in the history of space flight is the switch to LOX/LH2 engines in the 70's - LE-7 and Vulcain, SSME and RS-68 later. Without blaming the shuttle for everything-that-gone-wrong-with-the-space-program, was the SSME the reason for that ?
I mean, LH2 is good for upper stages, but unless you have the Aerojet M-1, kerosene sounds better for first stages.

they switch to LOX/LH2 engines, but Lox/kerosine in first stage was replace by cheaper solid booster, see Shuttle, Ariane 5 or here on H-2.
Japan made switch from N-1/H-1 to H-2 because for license reasons, because the N-1/2 and H-1 were Delta 1000 series clone

Shuttle and Ariane 5 are special case:
Shuttle needed reusable compact high thrust engine.
Ariane 5 had to carry a 20 ton mini shuttle or launch communication satellite into GEO with low cost
same goes for H-1/2 it had to carry also a mini shuttle to Freedom space station

A kickstart with cheap solid booster and then fly rest on LOX/LH2 engines is a very good solution on that mission profile
 

Grey Havoc

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Grey Havoc said:
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T120721002739.htm

The H-2B, which is designed to be launched once a year, is 56.6 meters high and weighs 531 tons, making it the largest rocket in the history of Japanese space development.

The cargo vehicle, weighing in at 4.6 tons, is carrying such supplies as food and other daily necessities, a water tank for feeding killifish and a device for releasing small satellites into space, the space exploration agency said.

The H-2B was jointly developed by JAXA and Mitsubishi Heavy for the purpose of carrying the Kounotori, which has a payload capacity of 16.5 tons. The rocket is twice as effective as H-2A rockets at launching satellites into orbit, JAXA said.

JAXA plans to develop a "homing version" of the Kounotori that will be used to return ISS equipment to Earth, JAXA officials said.

Like the H-2A, the country's mainstay rocket, the H-2B's first and second components are propelled through the reaction of liquefied hydrogen and liquefied oxygen.

Following the decommissioning last year of U.S. space shuttles, the Kounotori has been gaining international attention as a means of transporting large payloads into space, JAXA said.

Regarding the Kounotori: New Kounotori spacecraft to handle multiple tasks (The Yomiuri Shimbun)
 

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