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Italian twin-fuselage myths

Skybolt

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I've started research for a projected book on the three SIAI-Marchetti late war prototypes (SM-91 to 93). Don't hold your breath, it will take at least a year... :p In real Secret Projects style, competitors and relatives will be treated besides the requirement-design-evolution-construction-test cycle of each. I want to share with you some of what has emerged so far for the "environment" of the SM-92 (the twin fuselage one, for those not familiar with Italian airplanes): in particular i can debunk some myths. First, there was some form (very informal) of "competition" for an heavy-fighter in early 1942. To that responded only SIAI Marchetti, FIAT with the G-58 and perhaps Reggiane with a derivative of the Re-2005 with a larger airframe and span. The MC-205 twin isn't a tender to this requirement. It was designed by the direct suggestion of the Air Force Technical Inspector (General Ilari) in late spring of 1943, but Macchi made it clear that the design wasn't worth pursuing. Moreover, the Mc-300 designation is pure fantasy. The Ca-380 and 381 Corsaro seem not related to this requirement but to another one, later, end of 1942, for something similar to the Mosquito (like in Germany the Ta-154). So it was entirely built in wood and was intended primarily for solo flights for interdiction, counter-air etc (like the Mosquito). Moreover, it was intended as a light bomber and torpedo bomber besides the heavy fighter role. From this the name Corsaro (Corsair).
Finally, the P-125 from Piaggio, sometimes linked with the heavy-fighter competiton of 1942, had in fact nothing to do with it. That design was simply the B.S. Bombardiere Santangelo, a tri-motor twin boom design submitted to the Bombardiere Normale competition from 1938 by Major Santangelo of the Regia Aeronautica, the construction of which was crafted to Piaggio (which did everything they could to not do it... ::) ). All work of the redesignated P.125 ended in July 1940.
 

hesham

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Hi skybolt,

And the IMAM Ro.55 was twin-fuselage project for twin
float recce seaplane,but I have no more details.
 

Skybolt

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Yes, much earlier, for the 1938-39 competition for big-ships (heavy cruisers) recon floatplane. It was a competitor of the FIAT-CMASA RS-14, but wasn't considered very well and rejected early. No-one ever succeeded in finding a drawing (IMAM archives has been thoroughly and methodically destroyed after the bankruptcy of the parent company, Breda, in 1950).
BTW, not twin fuselage but answering the same "Zanzara" (Mosquito in Italian) requirement was the Ca-184 from Caproni Taliedo, an evolution of the so-called Ca-313 Fusoliera Piccola (small fuselage), later redesignated Ca-176. It matched a Ca-313 G wing with a new fuselage and two DB-605. January 1943. If you didn't ever heard of these projects, it is because no-one ever saw them before.. ;D 8)
 

Antonio

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Skybolt,

is there any possibility for Italian Secret Projects book?. I'd really love it :eek:
 

Skybolt

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Todo es posible my friend.. ;) But if the likes of Midland don't decide it is interesting for the market at large to have something on Italian projects, I doubt it. What I'm trying to do is a series of books on particular themes, always starting from some built aircraft (even as prototype) 'cause here in Italy modellers hold the sway in historical aviation publishers audience and scratch building is not so popular... My Italian publisher reduces its risks, can insert the book in a well established series, and nevertheless there will be tons of Secret Projects in it.. Simply they won't be on the cover ;D
 

lark

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Mouthwatering :p

Can hardly wait to see the first title.
 

Skybolt

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Eh, eh eh ;) . Will be on the Sm-91, 92, 93.
 

Skybolt

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Resurrecting an old topic to set things straight. The P-125 wasn't the CS (Caccia Santangelo), but the BS, Bombardiere Santangelo. The BS was tendered for the last iteration of th Bombardiere Normale RFP in 1939, but had not an intended manufacturer. After being selected by the DGCA it was tendered first to Breda for prototype building (Breda was offered the CS too), but turned down. Finally, Piaggio accepted, but with strict limitations (essentially, they wanted Santangelo out of the way). The work, at very low pace (essentially studies on weight distribution and structures) ended just after the Italy's entry into the war.
 

hesham

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Skybolt said:
Resurrecting an old topic to set things straight. The P-125 wasn't the CS (Caccia Santangelo), but the BS, Bombardiere Santangelo. The BS was tendered for the last iteration of th Bombardiere Normale RFP in 1939, but had not an intended manufacturer. After being selected by the DGCA it was tendered first to Breda for prototype building (Breda was offered the CS too), but turned down. Finally, Piaggio accepted, but with strict limitations (essentially, they wanted Santangelo out of the way). The work, at very low pace (essentially studies on weight distribution and structures) ended just after the Italy's entry into the war.
Thank you my dear Skyblot,

and please if you have some drawings,that will be better,and thanks.
 
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