• Hi Guest! Forum rules have been updated. All users please read here.

ISKANDER-M (9K720 Iskander (Russian: Искандер) development and deployment

phrenzy

as long as all they ask me about is the air war...
Joined
Oct 31, 2013
Messages
278
Reaction score
0
I have been researching Russian strategic and tactical missile systems development and posture through the transition from U.S.S.R to the Russian federation for a university project and have come across some very interesting information about the development of the ISKANDER-M TEL and it's recent deployment to Syria.

I think it's deserving of it's own thread given that this is the first deployment of any new missile system that potentially contravines the INF and new START.

I am compiling information on specifications, capability and deployment.

For a start:

A program overview as of 2012:

http://www.doria.fi/bitstream/handle/10024/84362/StratL4_42w.pdf

An older document from 2008 detailing the development from the OKA to ISKANDER missile systems:

https://www.files.ethz.ch/isn/94687/2008_4.pdf


I will arrange other sources as I coalate them, I believe I have some interesting technical material on the data links and command and control systems and will add them where appropriate as well as updates on it's deployment and potential nuclear capability.

I would invite discussion and contribution.

If this is more appropriate in the "Russian Strategic Weapon Modernization Plans" thread this can be moved and I'll add my sources as updates there. However I feel that now that ISKANDER has been deployed to a war zone it deserves its own thread.


 

2cobras

CLEARANCE: Restricted
Joined
Nov 28, 2015
Messages
9
Reaction score
3
The 2012 link doesn't work for me at this time.

Why 2 completely different missiles both called Iskander (variant of Alexander I believe)? Merely to cause confusion - or to slip a treaty-busting cruise missile into service under the guise of a short range ballistic missile (still a massive threat in itself given Europe's parlous defensive state)?
 

Pioneer

Seek out and close with the enemy
Senior Member
Joined
May 22, 2006
Messages
1,770
Reaction score
150
An amazing system IMO.
It has never ceased to amaze me how the Soviet's/Russian's continued to develop battlefield ballistic rockets/missiles to this day (including their amazing and versatile TEL's)

Good luck with your endeavour phrenzy

Regards
Pioneer
 

lastdingo

Blogger http://defense-and-freedom.blogspot.de/
Joined
Oct 18, 2008
Messages
584
Reaction score
18
Website
defense-and-freedom.blogspot.de
2cobras said:
The 2012 link doesn't work for me at this time.

Why 2 completely different missiles both called Iskander (variant of Alexander I believe)? Merely to cause confusion - or to slip a treaty-busting cruise missile into service under the guise of a short range ballistic missile (still a massive threat in itself given Europe's parlous defensive state)?
Same unit to employ them, same launcher vehicle, same loading vehicle ... Russians don't call things a "system", but a 'komplex' - and the Iskander komplex includes two different munitions - just as a MLRS in NATO armies employs different rocket types.


Besides, I think the approach of having a standard MLRS capable of launching PGMs over hundreds of km as done by the Americans with MLRS / ATACMS makes more sense than those dedicated Iskander units.
Ideally, one should also be able to launch 499 km PGMs from a standing storage container wired to a control unit. That way one could launch truly impressive surprise and saturation attacks. Iskander's conceptual weakness is that even a whole regiment cannot launch huge quantities of rockets in for example 20 minutes.
 

phrenzy

as long as all they ask me about is the air war...
Joined
Oct 31, 2013
Messages
278
Reaction score
0
The different versions appear to for Russian Federation use and export use. The Russian version has a wider range of warheads ( including potentially a tactical nuclear version) as well as a lower minimun, maximum range and more accurate CEP.

The export version, ISKANDER-E, has increased maximum range, reduced maximum range and is is deliberate made unfit for nuclear service, though still an impressive piece of equipment.

Both have extremely quick set up and firing times times and non-ballistic trajectory characteristics that make any sort of ABM countermeasure extremely difficult to employ.

I will try and fix the first 2012 link, I think spell check might have changed some small detail :) *edit: first link fixed*

P.S real clear defence seems to have the most up to date information on specifications and deployments at the moment for those interested.
 

lastdingo

Blogger http://defense-and-freedom.blogspot.de/
Joined
Oct 18, 2008
Messages
584
Reaction score
18
Website
defense-and-freedom.blogspot.de
I actually still possess a marketing CD about Iskander-E from either a Eurosatory or a Farnborough show (not sure which).
Sadly, I possess no working CD/DVD drive here. Maybe I can upload it to MEGA at work some time if I find a computer with CD/DVD drive there.

The export version is strangely compliant with MTCR, even though Russia is not bound by it:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missile_Technology_Control_Regime


The export version, ISKANDER-E, has increased maximum range, reduced maximum range and is is deliberate made unfit for nuclear service, though still an impressive piece of equipment.
increased minimum range maybe?
 

phrenzy

as long as all they ask me about is the air war...
Joined
Oct 31, 2013
Messages
278
Reaction score
0
Thanks for the correction, you're right about the increased minimum range. I'm running all this without aid of a PC at the moment so I'm getting making small mistakes which I hope to correct in the fullness of time.

I'd be very interested and grateful for the video, I assume it's the standard Mid Atlantic Russian voiceover spiel you see in most and show marketing? Just making sure I don't have to get out my Cyrillic table or have a friend do some translating. Although since it's from Farnborough I'm guessing that won't be an issue.


I think there's something odd about the way the Russians are treating export treaty compliance and domestic treaty non compliance here. This could turn out to be a good case study for their policy approach.

Thanks again, if it's too much bother at least I know it exists and I can try and hunt down a copy somewhere else.
 

phrenzy

as long as all they ask me about is the air war...
Joined
Oct 31, 2013
Messages
278
Reaction score
0
lastdingo said:
I actually still possess a marketing CD about Iskander-E from either a Eurosatory or a Farnborough show (not sure which).
Sadly, I possess no working CD/DVD drive here. Maybe I can upload it to MEGA at work some time if I find a computer with CD/DVD drive there.

The export version is strangely compliant with MTCR, even though Russia is not bound by it:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missile_Technology_Control_Regime


The export version, ISKANDER-E, has increased maximum range, reduced maximum range and is is deliberate made unfit for nuclear service, though still an impressive piece of equipment.
increased minimum range maybe?
There seems to be some confusion about the configuration of the units deployed to then deployed and sold on credit to Armenia, but if they don't already contravine the MTCR they would be almost immediately able to depending on the missiles and payloads the Russians are willing to give them. Interestingly it was supplied because of Armenian concerns about Azerbaijan and their acquisition of MLRS systems. Central Asia is becoming a dangerous new front.

Also the source of the confirmation of the Syrian deployment came through high resolution commercial imagery and, interestingly, the Israelis, who attempted to acquire ISKANDER themselves last decade. I guess they're burning their bridges there with regard to access to high end Russian equipment, but given the regional (almost local now) situation, needs must. Gives some good insight into their desperation for tactical ABM systems, not just for Katyusha variants...
 
Top