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Huge Chute to Land Cabin from Disabled Plane

hesham

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Hi,

a great idea by Maj. E. L. Hoffman,it showed how to use giant
parachute to lift detachable cabin from disable plane.

 

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mz

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modern ballistic recovery chutes on light planes have probably saved quite many lives.
I wonder how much the idea faced opposition during the years.
 

Gridlock

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Any plane other than the Aardvark have this kind of setup?

crew-module-test.jpg
 

Gridlock

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Thanks, I knew one did and couldn't put my finger on it..

Did Comanche too, or is that just "Goldeneye" colouring my memory?
 

hesham

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Thank you my dears,

and from the Site which my dear Jemiba displayed it;

http://modelarchives.free.fr/Bestiaire/Benayad_P/index.html
 

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F-14D

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mz said:
modern ballistic recovery chutes on light planes have probably saved quite many lives.
I wonder how much the idea faced opposition during the years.

Most of the opposition on production aircraft cam from two camps: First the "He-man" camp which felt that if you flew right, you wouldn't need such a wussy thing. Second, those who felt that the increase in safety wasn't worth the extra weight, cost and complexity, weight being a big thing on a light plane. The jury may still be out on that last, as the Cirrus aircraft, the first (I think) production aircraft to use it do not have a better safety/survival recovery record than those non-equipped. In fact, ironically, the accident rate is a bit worse.

Part of the problem may be the same thing seen when certain safety devices (such as anti-lock brakes) got introduced to automobiles. It looks like people subconsciously thought that since they had these magical brakes they could drive "closer to the edge". In a similar manner, there's some thought that the chutes on light planes may also give a subconscious lowering of the guard, where people were continuing into situations where they would have backed off without the sense of security of the chute. It's also thought that some people looked at it like a zero-zero ejection seat and waited too long to deploy it. There's also some speculation that people were reluctant to use it because although it could save your life, the aircraft usually would suffer sufficient damage that it could not fly again. This made people want to try and "save" the situation until it was too late.

Hopefully, education and training will overcome these situations.
 

F-14D

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Gridlock said:
Thanks, I knew one did and couldn't put my finger on it..

Did Comanche too, or is that just "Goldeneye" colouring my memory?

The helo in "Goldeneye" was the Eurocopter Tiger. It shows the power of the James Bond films, because when it flew in the movie there were only two or three of them in existence, yet Eurocopter made one available. Another example was in the movie Bond drove a BMW Z3 for a short bit. At the time of filming, I believe it was the first production one in the world.
 

fightingirish

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Still, the escape capsule shown in the movie "Goldeneye" is fictional.
 

Panzerknacker

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There are some system like that in service to land the ENTIRE plane like the BRS, of course works only for light aircraft.

A real case of use over the pampas.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrVxp_gyTcI&feature=related
 

Nick

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This idea was used in fiction in the classic* Lord of the Flies by William Golding. The boys are travelling in an aircraft that develops trouble and the passenger cabin is released and parachuted to a (supposed) place of safety.


*Classic, as in 'schoolkids must read this'. ;)
 

Hammer Birchgrove

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Nick said:
This idea was used in fiction in the classic* Lord of the Flies by William Golding. The boys are travelling in an aircraft that develops trouble and the passenger cabin is released and parachuted to a (supposed) place of safety.


*Classic, as in 'schoolkids must read this'. ;)
So that's why it's some times called SF... ;)
 

hesham

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Also from l'Aeronautique 1934.
 

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Grey Havoc

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detachable-cabin.JPG

http://www.independent.co.uk/travel/detachable-cabin-invented-to-save-lives-during-plane-crashes-a6814311.html​
 

hesham

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Page 154;

https://books.google.com.eg/books?id=RHt86xArAsoC&printsec=frontcover&hl=ar&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false
 

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hesham

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Hi,

http://www.maximonline.ru/longreads/get-smart/_article/black-box/
 

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Granit

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The second picture does not apply to the theme of the topic. It is the world's first backpack parachute Kotelnikov design.
 

hesham

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Thank you my dear Granit for that explanation.
 

hesham

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From Toute L'Aviation.
 

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SeaslugMk2

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The HP Victor was originally designed to have a jettisonable cockpit/nose cone using a set of explosive bolts. A glider was set up as a scale (3/5ths?) model with about 40 feet of multicore cable connecting sensors in the cockpit to a transmitter in the fuselage via a quick-release connector to check how it released. The afternoon before the test a tidy minded electrician (not knowing what the test flight was for) saw this vast bundle of wires and shortened it. As a result the telemetry signals lasted about a quarter of a second; the concept was not proceeded with. All the production Victors, however, had the cockpit section attached to the fuselage by four large bolts.

SRJ.

Edited to restore missing bracket.
 
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