How to draw cutaways in MS paint

covert_shores

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Not quite streaming but a step by step. http://www.hisutton.com/How%20to%20draw%20sub%20cutaways%20in%20MS%20Paint.html

How is vector graphics easier/faster/better?

Note that I only draw this way because I like it. Illustrating is not my day job.
 

Silencer1

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Hello, covert_shores!



covert_shores said:
Not quite streaming but a step by step. http://www.hisutton.com/How%20to%20draw%20sub%20cutaways%20in%20MS%20Paint.html

How is vector graphics easier/faster/better?

Note that I only draw this way because I like it. Illustrating is not my day job.



First of all - nice and vivid illustration!
No one (except forum members :cool:) aware, what type of software and technique you use - we just see perfect result!
Looks like you found your' own way to prepare illustration.


I'm not use MS Paint for many years, because it's capabilities doesn't include many quite useful features (transparency and layers are most important).
About GIMP my knowledge limited - it's free alternative to Adobe Photoshop and similar "heavyweights".
So, I suggest you at least try one of them, at least for above mentioned functions.


Vector software has it's pros and cons.
Pros: infinite scaling and transforming of the vector objects, easiness to draw curves, small size of files etc. Easy duplication and repurposing objects and group of objects.
Cons: limited abilities to "weathering" - it's possible, but not so intuitive way to add some natural scratches, spots, rust and similar things with soft border and uniform fill.


You wrote, that illustration isn't your' day job, but IMHO you made a certain number of illustrations to threat you as professional.
So, good luck - and try different approaches in drawing and software to use. Now, there were number of relatively cheap (or free) software both for pixel- or vector-drawing.
 

Jemiba

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Besides the mentioned pros, to me it's the fact, that all objects remain independent from each other,
so, if you're moving an object in front of another one, the latter remains unaltered. AFAIK, MS Paint
doesn't allow for several layers or stacked objects.
Nevertheless, neither a pixel based, nor a vector graphics software allow for relatively easy change of
angle of view. That's why I'm trying to find a suitable CAD software (easy to use, reasonable results,
not too pricy .. ::) ) and trying to come to grips with Free CAD in the moment.
 

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sferrin

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IMO if you want to easily be able to change views it should just be done in CAD/3D (Solidworks or Max for example). (Though cutaways. . .yikes. That's a lot a modlin'.) Standard illustrations are easy as you just use a different rendering engine at render time.
 

covert_shores

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i used be be proficient at AutoCAD and later Blender etc, but I am sure that it has all changed now. I just enjoy the creative process of MS Paint. Never tried Vector Graphics - have seen some amazing things.
 
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