Help identify unbuilt German post-war rear engined airliner

AeroFranz

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I apologize in advance for the lack of clues - I'm doing some research for work and for the past week i haven't been able to find information about a German early post-WWII mid-size airliner with rear engines. IIRC, it featured a weird inlet arrangement (not the typical podded engines a la Caravelle of DC-9), which must have inevitably sucked the boundary layer from the fuselage. For whatever reason, the manufacturer Heinkel or Henschel comes to mind.
I've tried all sorts of combinations of keywords but did not get any lucky hits. Anyone knows what i'm talking about?
Cheers!
 

hesham

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And maybe SIAT-311.
 

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AeroFranz

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Jens was right! i can't believe i wasn't able to find it. Well, it's great to know that if your memory fails the collective knowledge of SPF can fill the gaps! ;D
CiTrus, the Argentinian aircraft was not what i was looking for but thanks for introducing me to a similar concept that i was unaware of.
The inlet arrangement is definitely funny on the 211. Besides the annular intake, the base of the vertical tails form a triangular inlet. I wonder what would prompt this design decision.
 

AeroFranz

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So I think i answered my own question. The fin inlet goes to the gas generator, whose exhaust goes through a scroll around the cruise fans fed by the annular intake. See the attached picture, which shows more clearly what the tip-fan looks like on a different concept.

[edit]: or maybe not... avWeek of april 2nd, 1962, says it was powered by GE CF700 aft fans. The aft fan simply has a gas generator in the front whose exhaust spins a fan positioned to the rear, it's simply gas-coupled, there are no concentric shafts like in a turbofan. So that explains the single exhaust for each engine in the He-211. I guess the gas generator of the CF700 gets its air from the fin inlets and the fans from the annular intake. Maybe the core cannot tolerate ingesting the boundary layer as well as the fans, hence the need for an inlet that grabs 'clean' air.
 

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