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Handley Page HP.103,a Jet Provost conversion Project

hesham

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Hi,


the Handley Page HP.103 was a conversion of Jet Provost,into a laminar flow control
studies during the 1955,it was powered by one Armstrong Siddeley Viper A.S.V.5
engine.


https://books.google.com.eg/books?id=L-k5AwAAQBAJ&pg=PA101&lpg=PA101&dq=Handley+Page+HP.130+aircraft&source=bl&ots=Qzx2ylsC6b&sig=HuQvGZ81entOPH4yNqyPvok1XcM&hl=ar&sa=X&ei=A76vVLW1A47saPnbgIgE&ved=0CFkQ6AEwCg#v=onepage&q=Handley%20Page%20HP.130%20aircraft&f=false
 

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alertken

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RAE Aerodynamics explored laminar flow for many years. HP employed Gustav Lachmann (co-patent holder, HP "slots") before, during and after WW2, 1960s as Head of Research. The settled notion was of sucking the boundary layer, small turbine somewhere on board, electric-razor-style perforations in the leading edge. 1950s/60s MoS/MoA had a modest Aircraft Research budget to fund those RAE ideas seen in the Ministry as of practical potential. (see: SC1, FD2, Hunting Jet Flap...) Marshall MA.4+David Budworth turbine, Cranfield Lancaster, then Lincoln carrying an HP airfoil mid-upper. Lachmann put up various flying test bed notions, inc. this JP, and a DH.125.

The issue with sucking was gunge (flies in the pores) and maintenance. That and the invention of the big fan, permitting cheap long haul, dished the notion.
 

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