Germanwings Flight 9525 crash murder suicide?

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Donald McKelvy
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"Alone at controls, co-pilot sought to ‘destroy’ the plane"
Originally published March 26, 2015 at 5:40 am
Updated March 26, 2015 at 8:55 am

Source:
http://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/official-1-pilot-locked-out-of-crash-plane-cockpit/

PARIS (AP) — The co-pilot of the Germanwings jet barricaded himself in the cockpit and “intentionally” rammed the plane full speed into the French Alps, ignoring the captain’s frantic pounding on the cockpit door and the screams of terror from passengers, a prosecutor said Thursday.
A searcher on Wednesday checks the crash site of the Germanwings Airbus A320 that crashed in the French Alps. (GUILLAUME HORCAJUELO / EPA)
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In a split second, he killed all 150 people aboard the plane.

Andreas Lubitz’s “intention (was) to destroy this plane,” Marseille prosecutor Brice Robin said, laying out the horrifying conclusions French investigators reached after listening to the last minutes of Tuesday’s Flight 9525 from the plane’s black box voice data recorder.

The Airbus A320 was flying from Barcelona to Duesseldorf when it lost radio contact with air traffic controllers and began dropping from its cruising altitude of 38,000 feet. The prosecutor said Lubitz wordlessly set the plane on an 8-minute descent into the craggy French mountainside that pulverized the plane.

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He said the German co-pilot’s responses, initially courteous in the first part of the trip, became “curt” when the captain began the mid-flight briefing on the planned landing.

Robin said the pilot, who has not been identified, left the cockpit when the plane reached cruising altitude, presumably to go to the lavatory. Then the 28-year-old co-pilot took control of the jet as requested.

“When he was alone, the co-pilot manipulated the buttons of the flight monitoring system to initiate the aircraft’s descent,” Robin said.

The pilot knocked several times “without response,” the prosecutor said, adding that the cockpit door could only be blocked manually from the inside.

The co-pilot said nothing from the moment the captain left, Robin said: “It was absolute silence in the cockpit.”

The A320 is designed with safeguards to allow emergency entry into the cockpit if a pilot inside is unresponsive. The override code known to the crew does not go into effect, however — and indeed goes into a lockdown — if the person inside the cockpit specifically denies entry.

During the flight’s final minutes, pounding could be heard on the cockpit door as the plane’s instrument alarms sounded but the co-pilot’s breathing was calm and that of a fully conscious man, Robin said.

“You don’t get the impression that there was any particular panic, because the breathing is always the same. The breathing is not panting. It’s a classic, human breathing,” Brice said.

No distress call ever went out from the cockpit, and the control tower’s pleas for a response went unanswered.

Air traffic control cleared the area to allow the plane to make an emergency landing if needed, and asked other planes to try to make contact. The French air force scrambled a fighter jet to try to head off the crash.

Just before the plane hit the mountain, passengers’ cries of terror could be heard on the voice recorder.

“The victims realized just at the last moment,” Robin said. “We can hear them screaming.”

Airlines in Europe are not required to have two people in the cockpit at all times, unlike the standard U.S. operating procedure after the 9/11 attacks changed to require a flight attendant to take the spot of a briefly departing pilot.

Neither Robin nor Lufthansa indicated there was anything the pilot could have done to avoid the crash, saying he had acted appropriately.

Robin said Lubitz had never been flagged as a terrorist and would not give details on his religion or his ethnic background. German authorities were taking charge of the investigation into him.

Lufthansa CEO Carsten Spohr said the airline was already “appalled” by what happened in its low-cost subsidiary.

“I could not have imagined that becoming even worse,” Spohr said in Cologne. “We choose our cockpit staff very, very carefully.”

Lubitz had joined Germanwings in September 2013, directly out of flight school, and had flown 630 hours. Spohr said the airline had no indication why he would have crashed the plane. He said pilots undergo yearly medical examination but that doesn’t include psychological tests.

Lufthansa’s chief said Lubitz started his training in 2008 and there was a “several-month” gap in his training six years ago. Spohr said he couldn’t say what the reason for that was but after the break “he not only passed all medical tests but also his flight training, all flying tests and checks.”

Robin avoided describing the crash as a suicide.

“Usually, when someone commits suicide, he is alone,” he said. “When you are responsible for 150 people at the back, I don’t necessarily call that a suicide.”

In the German town of Montabaur, acquaintances told The Associated Press that Lubitz appeared normal and happy when they saw him last fall as he renewed his glider pilot’s license.

“He was happy he had the job with Germanwings and he was doing well,” said a member of the glider club, Peter Ruecker, who watched Lubitz learn to fly. “He gave off a good feeling.”

Lubitz had obtained his glider pilot’s license as a teenager, and was accepted as a Lufthansa pilot trainee after finishing a tough German college preparatory school, Ruecker said. He described Lubitz as “rather quiet” but friendly.

Lubitz’s Facebook page, deleted sometime in the past two days, showed a smiling man in a dark brown jacket posing in front of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. The Facebook page was restored after the French prosecutor’s press conference.

Robin said the Germanwings plane’s second black box still had not been found but remains of the victims were being collected and DNA identification had begun.

In the Alpine hamlet of Le Vernet, French authorities set up a viewing tent for family members on Thursday to look toward the site of the crash, which lies on a steep, treacherous site only reachable by a long hike.

Robin said Lubitz’s family was in France but was being kept separate from the other victims’ families. The victims’ families were briefed ahead of the press conference.

“The victims deserve explanations from the prosecutor,” Robin said. “(But) they are having a hard time believing it.”

The principal of Joseph Koenig High School in Haltern, Germany, Ulrich Wessel, which lost 16 students and two teachers in the crash, said the state governor had called him Thursday afternoon to tell him about the probe’s conclusion.

“It is much, much worse than we had thought,” Wessel said. “It doesn’t make the number of dead any worse, but if it had been a technical defect then measures could have been taken so that it would never happen again.”

The circumstances of the crash are likely to revive questions about the possibility of suicidal pilots and the wisdom of sealing off the cockpit.

“From the moment it became apparent that the Germanwings flight had made a controlled descent for 8 minutes with no ‘Mayday,’ one feared that either pilot suicide or hijack was the cause,” said Philip Baum, London-based editor of trade magazine Aviation Security International.

“The kneejerk reaction to the events of 9/11 with the ill-thought reinforced cockpit door has had catastrophic consequences,” he added.

___

McHugh reported from Montabaur, Germany. David Rising in Berlin; Kirsten Grieshaber in Cologne, Germany; Alan Clendenning in Madrid; Danica Kirka in London; Sylvie Corbet, Philippe Sotto and Angela Charlton in Paris; and Greg Keller in Vernet, France, contributed to this report.
 

Michel Van

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That not first time this happened

several years ago EgyptAir Flight 990 crash into atlantic killing all on board
Cockpit voice recorder reveal same situation pilot out cockpit, co pilot went into dive
The guy was on last flight after Air Egypt firer him, because misconduct in New York

another case i remember was of passenger running amok in airliner in 1980s
he killed personal and pilots with gun then crash the airliner

and this insane case of Federal Express pilot, who in 1994 on flight 705 try to kill 3 college pilots and commit suicide by ramming the Cargo plane into Federal Express headquarter
to his bad luck the 3 were former navy pilots and they know to fight for there life
even though there heavy wounded by hammer blows, two manage to overwhelm him with other pilot landed the damage DC-10 cargo plane
he had made harsh aerobatic maneuvers with plane to catapult the maniac on every wall corner of cockpit, to knock him out.
 

NilsD

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So is this acceptable collateral damage for completely shutting out potential hijackers?
 

TomS

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NilsD said:
So is this acceptable collateral damage for completely shutting out potential hijackers?

This sort of thing happened before the cabin door locks were implemented. See Egyptair 990, in 1999.

The problem in part is the lack of policy in European airlines to require 2 people in the cockpit so that there would be someone to open the door and let the other pilot back in.
 

Hot Breath

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Perhaps the Japanese have the right idea with their requirement to have three pilots in the cockpit at any one time?
 

TomS

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Hot Breath said:
Perhaps the Japanese have the right idea with their requirement to have three pilots in the cockpit at any one time?

Source? I've not heard of such a requirement.
 

airman

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Surely a third pilot of reserve could be useful to avoid this dramatic situations but the real problem is an other : make control on real good mental health of pilot .
 

Jeb

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Michel Van said:
and this insane case of Federal Express pilot, who in 1994 on flight 705 try to kill 3 college pilots and commit suicide by ramming the Cargo plane into Federal Express headquarter
to his bad luck the 3 were former navy pilots and they know to fight for there life
even though there heavy wounded by hammer blows, two manage to overwhelm him with other pilot landed the damage DC-10 cargo plane
he had made harsh aerobatic maneuvers with plane to catapult the maniac on every wall corner of cockpit, to knock him out.


Oh man, I remember that case. I lived in Memphis then (where FedEx is headquartered) and their DC-10s flew over our campus all the time. I hadn't thought about it in ages.
 

pathology_doc

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Bring back the flight engineer in future designs, at least of the big transoceanic aircraft. The computer systems are IMO already evolving to the point where their complexity and the need to manage them properly demands it. The other advantage is that the FE does not at any time have immediate responsibility for control of the aircraft and is always free to attend to other matters.
 

Jemiba

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Investigations revealed, that the co-pilot had several sick notes, one of them for the time of his
last flight. And he concealed all of them to his employer. Something like that is well known in the
modern world of business. To be ill means to be a bad risk for the company, something, that can
have serious consequences. But in an airliner it may have consequences to the passengers as well !
I remember an article in Air International about the "great" world of many commercial pilots. Actually,
it wasn't a warning, that one of them could deliberately crash his aircraft. But it was pointed to the
risk of putting too much pressure on the flying staff. Maybe this could be a point to look at ?
 

Arjen

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Süddeutsche Zeitung reports the copilot had been receiving psychiatric treatment.

- Der Copilot der abgestürzten Germanwings-Maschine hat nach Erkenntnissen der Ermittler eine Erkrankung gegenüber dem Arbeitgeber und in seinem beruflichen Umfeld verheimlicht. Die Staatsanwaltschaft Düsseldorf hat eine zerrissene Krankschreibung für den Absturztag in seiner Wohnung gefunden.
- Nach SZ-Informationen soll Andreas Lubitz seit langer Zeit bei mehreren Medizinern in psychiatrischer Behandlung gewesen sein. Er hatte den Absturz des Flugzeuges bewusst herbeigeführt, bei dem 150 Menschen ums Leben kamen.
- Ein Vermerk in Lubitz' Akte beim Luftfahrtbundesamt weist darauf hin, dass er regelmäßig zur medizinischen Kontrolle musste.
BBC reports co-pilot Lubitz 'hid illness'
In a statement (in German), prosecutors said they had seized medical documents from Mr Lubitz's two residences - his Duesseldorf flat and his parents' home north of Frankfurt - which indicated an "existing illness and appropriate medical treatment".

The "fact that, among the documents found, there were sick notes - torn-up, current and for the day of the crash - leads to the provisional assessment that the deceased was hiding his illness from his employer", the report states.

Germanwings confirmed it had not been given a sick note for the day of the crash.

Duesseldorf's University Hospital issued a statement (in German) saying Mr Lubitz had attended the hospital on 10 March and last month.

Adding that it had handed his medical records over to prosecutors, it said reports the co-pilot had been treated there for depression were incorrect.

Germany's Rheinischer Post newspaper, which spoke to the hospital, quoted its own unnamed sources as saying Mr Lubitz had been suffering from a physical, rather than a mental, illness.
 

TomS

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airman said:
Surely a third pilot of reserve could be useful to avoid this dramatic situations but the real problem is an other : make control on real good mental health of pilot .

That's a lot of expense, and a lot of pilots.
 

JohnR

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TomS said:
airman said:
Surely a third pilot of reserve could be useful to avoid this dramatic situations but the real problem is an other : make control on real good mental health of pilot .

That's a lot of expense, and a lot of pilots.
Agreed, that's why the airlines happily gave up flight engineers.

It always makes me feel more than a little sick when something like this happens, and the relevant company trots out the old cliché of "the safety of our passengers and crew are our prime concern". No it's not, their prime concern is making money.
 

Orionblamblam

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JohnR said:
It always makes me feel more than a little sick when something like this happens, and the relevant company trots out the old cliché of "the safety of our passengers and crew are our prime concern". No it's not, their prime concern is making money.

If an airlines prime concern was passenger safety, they'd profile passengers and probably have *no* pilots, but rather fully automated aircraft. There'd be no windows. Flight and maintenance crews would be routinely spied upon and anyone displaying risk factors such as physical or mental illnesses, wacky political affiliations, recent religious conversions, gambling or drug use, any family or friends with any connection to anything untoward... would be summarily removed from their positions and either given substantial scrutiny or outright fired. On the other hand, everyone else would get paid handsomely.
 
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