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Fokker Designations, 1912 - 1921

Jemiba

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Got the book "Fokker Flugzeugwerke in Deutschland 1912 - 1921" by Peter M.Grosz and Volker Koos,
containing the types built in series and those amazing number (at least to me) of experimantal aircraft,
that mostly were just built in single examples.

I'll start with a list of the series aircraft, introducing the lesser known experimantal types in more depth
later.

- Fokker "Spinne", 1910, monoplane built by Jacob Goedecker, first aircraft, which was at least partially designed by Anthony Fokker
- Fokker "Spinne 2", 1911, again built by Jacob Goedecker
- Fokker "Spinne 3", 1911, first aircraft built by Fokker himself
- M 1, 1912, two seat training aircraft, monoplane derived from the "Spinne" (spider)
- M 2, 1913, military designation A, monoplane, two seat training aircraft, probably just four aircraft built
- M 5, 1914 , monoplane, single seat training and acrobatic aircraft, inspired by the Morane Type H
- M 5L , 1914 , military designation A II, two seat training and reconnaissance aircraft, 18 aircraft built
- M 5K , 1915 , military designation A III, two seat training and reconnaissance aircraft, - M 8, 1914, military designation A I,
two seat training and artillery spotter aircraft, around 80 aircraft built
- M 7, 1914, sesquiplane, military designation B I, two seat training aircraft, around 20 aircraft built
- M 10, 1915, biplane, two seat training and reconnaissance aircraft, development of the M 7, at least 35 aircraft
seem to have been built. The military designation was B I AND B II, both designations used
- M 14, 1915, military designation E I, developed/modified from the M 5K, single seat fighter aircraft, first with
synchronized machine gun, 68 aircraft built.
- M 14, 1915, military designation E II, E I with more powerful Oberursel U I engine, both types were very similar
 

Jemiba

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- M 14, 1915, military designation E II, development of the E II with more tankage, exact numbers hardly known
- M 15, 1915, military designation E IV, E III with powerful Oberursel U III engine and two fixed machine guns,
49 aircraft built.
- M 17, 1916, military designation D II, biplane, single seat fighter aircraft, Oberursel rotary engine, 181 aircraft built.
- M 18, 1916, military designation D I, biplane, single seat fighter aircraft, Mercedes D II inline engine, 113 aircraft built.
- M 19, 1916, military designation D III, biplane, single seat fighter aircraft, Oberursel rotary engine, 210 aircraft built.
- M 21, 1916, military designation D IV, biplane, single seat fighter aircraft, Mercedes D III inline engine, 88 aircraft built.
- M 22, 1916, military designation D V, biplane, single seat fighter aircraft, Oberursel rotary engine, around 200 aircraft
built, just used as trainers.
- Dr I, 1917, internal designation was the same as the military designation from this type onwards, triplane,
single seat fighter aircraft, Oberursel rotary engine, around 320 aircraft built.
- D VI, 1917, biplane, single seat fighter aircraft, Oberursel rotary engine, around 60 aircraft built.
- D VII, 1918, biplane, single seat fighter aircraft, Daimler D III, later BMW IIIa inline engines, number of built aircraft
not exactly know, probably more than 2500.
- E V/D VIII, 1918, parasol single seat fighter aircraft, the “D” designation was chosen after a new built wing was
used after several accidents, Oberursel rotary engine, around 289 aircraft built.
- C 1, 1919, biplane, two seat reconnaissance aircraft, ordered by the Dutch government during 1920,
probably around 80 aircraft built.
- F II, 1920, civil passenger aircraft for 4 – 5 passengers, 23 to 25 aircraft built.
- F III, 1921, development of the F II, civil passenger aircraft for 5 passengers, 20 aircraft built in Germany, 25 were built later in the Netherlands.
 

Jemiba

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I'll go on with the experimental, prototype and "one off" aircraft. Sometimes designations were
given only, when the aircraft was already flown for quite a time, ot to distinguish it from its pre-
decessors. Uncomplete and sometimes contradictory files add to the the difficult situation.

- W1, sesquiplane flying boat, 1913, powered by an 8 cyl. Renault engine, intended for the flying boat/seaplane contest in Monaco.
Span: 16,2 m, length 9,5m, crew: 2

- M3, Variant of the M2 low-wing aircraft, 1913, with angualr fuselage cross section. Didn’t meet the military requirements and was abandoned.
1 Argus engine with 100hp, Span: 13,85 m, length 7,95m, height 2,70m, empty weight 625 kg, TOW 960 kg, crew: 2

- M4, “Stahltaube” (steel dove), 1913, intended replacement for the M3, modified several times and flown with wing warping and conventional ailerons.
Nevertheless not accepted by the military board of acceptance.
1 Argus AS II engine with 120hp or 1 Daimler Mercedes DI with 100hp, Span: 14,00 m, length 10,00m, height 3,30m, crew: 2

- W2, Two-seat floatplane (sesquiplane) 1913, the vertical position of the fuselage in relation to the wing could be adjusted .
1 Daimler D II engine with 120 hp

- W3, This wasn’t an aircraft, but a speed boat made of aircraft floats and driven by a pusher prop

- M6, Two-seat version of the M5 with higher set wings for better visibility, lost in an accident 1914.
1 Oberursel U o engine with 80hp , wing area 18 qm, crew: 2

- W4, M7 fitted with floats, 1915, later brought back to standard (land) configuration

- M9, The only twin engined Fokker aircraft to be developed and built in the main factory in Schwerin, 1915.
Twin-boom layout, the booms were modified M8 fuselages. the central nacelle carried two engines in a push-pull
arrangement.Abandoned after severe vibration problems.
 

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- M16, Two-seat reconnaissance biplane, 1915. Three different variants were built
1 Austro Daimler engine with 160hp, Span: 11,60 m, length 7,65m, height 2,85m, empty weight 620 kg, TOW 1056 kg, crew: 2

- M 19 (Boelcke), Special Version of the M 19 with a Siemens Sh I engine, modified for fighter pilot Oswald Boelcke.
The day, this aircraft was finished, Boelcke crashed and died, the further fate of this Type is unknown.

- M 20, Probably an experimental monoplane, developed in 1916. Only the wing was built, then the project was cancelled.

- “Versuchsdoppeldecker” (experimental biplane) 1916 based on the M 17, modified during 1916
from a M 17 with a single-bay wing, a swept upper wing and a 100 hp Oberursel engine

- “Versuchsdoppeldecker” (experimental biplane) 1916, Only known from two photos, without further
documentation, similar to the DV, probably with a Siemens Sh I or Oberursel U III engine.

- D VI, 1916, not to be mistaken with the fighter aircraft D VI from 1918, which was derived from the prototypes
V 9 and V 13. For a short time Fokker used D-designations with roman numbers for internal designations, before
shifting to V-designations. This type was similar to the D V, but with a different support for the upper wing

- V 1, 1917, sesquiplane without bracing, monocoque construction wings without conventional ailerons, but with
turnable wingtips. The incidence of the upper wing could be adjusted in flight. Powered by a (seized) French Le-Rhône
engine with 110 hp. Span: 8,60 m, length 5,90 m, height 2,70 m, empty weight 442 kg, TOW 563 kg, crew: 1,
Max. speed 180 km/h

- V 2, 1917, development of the V 1 with a slightly larger wing and a Daimler D III engine.
Span: 9,30 m, length 6,60 m, height 2,94 m, empty weight 680 kg, TOW 938 kg, crew: 1,
Max. speed 190 km/h
 

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- V 3, 1917, development of the V 2 with a conventional tail, similar to the Albatros D III, without the
possibility to adjust the incidence of the upper wing. Span: 9,20 m, length 6,60 m, height 2,94 m, empty
weight 663 kg, TOW 921 kg, crew: 1, Max. speed 190 km/h

- V 4/ V IV, 1917, predecessor of the Dr.I triplane. Span: 6,21 m, length 5,75 m, height 2,95 m,
empty weight 346 kg, TOW 525 kg, crew: 1, Max. speed 200 km/h

- V 5, 1917 (older internal designation D VI), developed from the V 4, tailplane with straight leading edges.
Prototype for the Dr.I Span: 6,73 m, length 5,75 m, height 2,73 m, empty weight 375 kg, TOW 571 kg, crew: 1,
Max. speed 200 km/h

- V 6, 1917 (older internal designation D VII), triplane with a water cooled Mercedes engine with 160 hp. Lower
wing under the fuselage, leading to problems due to turbulence and vibrations. Later modified, but without success.
This lead to abandoning of the development of triplanes with water cooled engines.
Span: 7,90 m, length 6,60 m, height 3,15 m, empty weight 637 kg, TOW 880 kg, crew: 1,

- V 7, 1917, four examples were built, powered by 150/160 hp rotation engines S & H Sh III, Le-Rhône
or Oberursel U III. Span: 7,20 m, length 6,22 m, height 2,95 m, empty weight 376 kg, TOW 571 kg, crew: 1,

- V 8, 1917, triplane/biplane tandem wing, expected to increase agility. Was tested just on a small number of short test
flights. Span: 7,70 m, length 6,80 m, height 2,80 m, Daimler D III engine with 160 hp, crew: 1,

- V 9, Prototype of the later D VI, 1917. Span: 7,70 m, length 5,90 m, height 2,80 m, empty weight 381 kg,
TOW 579 kg, crew: 1, Oberursel U II engine with 110 hp

- V 10, Single seat triplane on floats, 1917. As no reliable rotation engines with a power of about 160 hp were available,
a variant of the V 6 with a Daimler D.III was proposed, but rejected by Fokker himself, due to the unfavourable experiences
with triplanes powered by inline-engines.

- V 11, Predecessor/prototype of the later D.VII, two examples built with slightly different dimensions.
Daimler D.III engine with 160 hp, Span: 8,90 m, length 6,90 m, height 3,06 m, empty weight 654 kg, TOW 844 kg, crew: 1,
 

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Jemiba

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- V 10, Single seat triplane on floats, 1917. As no reliable rotation engines with a power of about 160 hp were available,
a variant of the V 6 with a Daimler D.III was proposed, but rejected by Fokker himself, due to the unfavourable experiences
with triplanes powered by inline-engines.

- V 12 :see V 13, factory number 1980

- V 13, This designation was used for at least three different biplanes, at least temporarily ! Factory number
Wnr.1980 (later designated as V 12) was sent to Budapest in 1918, factory numbers 1983 and 2054 were tested
as V 13 I and V 13 II in January 1918. Photo and data for the V 13 II: 1 Siemens Halske with 160 hp, Span: 6,75 m,
length 6,35 m, height 2,82 m, TOW 669 kg, crew: 1,

- V 17, triggered by the then current Junkers full metal monoplanes, this cantilever midwing
aircraft was built during December 1917.Althought testfligts revealed very good handling and agility,
it was rejected, because of the impeded sight from the cockpit due to the wing. 1 Oberursel with 110 hp,
Span: 8,38 m, length 5,80 m, height 2,80 m, empty weight 356 kg, TOW 535 kg, crew: 1,

- V 18, 1918, as the V 11 a predecessor/prototype of the later D.VII and later, with modifications, integrated into
the D,VII series as factory number 2116.

- V 19, According to the Fokker type list a monoplane with a 110 hp Le-Rhône engine, no other data available.

- V 20, Variant of the V 17 with a Daimler D.III inline engine with 160 hp. Developed in just one week, but
rejected because of poor cockpit view. Span: 9,29 m, length 7,14 m, height 3,00 m, empty weight 620 kg, TOW 821 kg, crew: 1

- V 22, Modification of the Fokker D.VII, March 1918, powered by a Austro-Daimler engine with 200 hp, driving a 4-bladed prop.

- V 23, 1918, cantilever midwing monoplane, two spar wing with a different airfoil compared to the V 20.
It was hoped, to show better performance, than the V 20, but no substantial improvements.
1 Daimler D.III engine with 160 hp, Span: 9,10 m, length 7,81 m, empty weight 658 kg, TOW 877 kg, crew: 1

- V 24, Modification of the Fokker D.VII, April 1918, powered by a Benz Bz.IV engine with 200 hp,

- V 25,low wing aircraft, April 1918, with Oberursel Ur.II engine with 110 hp, or Goebel Göe.III engine with 170 hp,
Span: 1,13 m, length 8,89 m, empty weight 365 kg, TOW 565 kg, crew: 1
 

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Jemiba

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- V 26, Only very few data available, maybe it was factory number 2733, a monoplane with Benz Bz.IV engine with 200 hp

- V 27, parasol monoplane from April 1918, sent to the “D-aircraft competition” in Adlershof. Regarded as the best aircraft
with the Bent Bz IIIbo engine and as equal to the Fokker E.V, but rejected because of problems with vibrations and engine gear.
Span: 9,68 m, length 6,34 m, empty weight 602 kg, TOW 840 kg, crew: 1

- V 28, Prototype of the Fokker E.V/D.VIII, May 1918. At least three examples built with different engines, Oberursel Ur. II
or III, Goebel Goe.III or Rhemag Sh.III. Span: 8,34 m, length 5,67 m, empty weight 405 kg, TOW 605kg, crew: 1, max.speed 200 km/h

- V 29, Parasol monoplane from June 1918, with a BMW IIIa engine with 185 hp, after tests not regarded as
suitable to replace the Fokker D.VII. Span: 9,68 m, length 7,02 m, empty weight 632 kg, TOW 861 kg, crew: 1

- V 33, derived from the V 9, August 1918, biplane fighter with an Oberursel Ur.II or III. After the war declared as a
sports aircraft and flown on several airshows in the Netherlands, maybe powered then by a Le-Rhône engine with 80 hp.
Span: 7,24 m, length 5,46 m, empty weight 360 kg, TOW 560 kg, crew: 1

- V 34, development of the D.VII with an oval frontal radiator, September 1918, sent to the “D-aircraft competition” in Adlershof,
October 1918. BMW IIIa engine with 185 hp, Span: 8,45 m, length 6,76 m, empty weight 628 kg, TOW 864 kg,
crew: 1, max.speed about 200 km/h

- V 35, No details known still yet

- V 36, variant of the D.VII with BMW IIIa engine with 185 hp, September 1918, sent to the “D-aircraft competition” in
Adlershof, October 1918. The fuel system was moved to the landing gear fairing to reduce the fire risk for the pilot.
Span: 8,94 m, length 6,46 m, empty weight 637 kg, TOW 871 kg, crew: 1, max.speed about 200 km/h

- V 37, parasol monoplane from October 1918, with a Benz Bz.IIIb engine with 195 hp. Behind the oversized spinner
was a cooling fan, the forward fuselage was armoured with 2.5 mm steel plating.

- V 38, factory number 3658, enlarged two-seat version of the Fokker D.VII, prototype of the C.I series, built after the war
 

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- V 39, sports aircraft built after the war, powered by a Gnome engine with 50 hp.
Span: 7,00 m, length 5,02 m, height 2,50 m, empty weight 210 kg, TOW 415 kg, crew: 1

- V 40, Two different types seemed to have used this designation:
A sports aircraft built after the war, even smaller than the V 39, powered by an Anzani engine with 35 hp.
Span: 5,90 m, length 3,94 m, height 2,50 m, empty weight 160 kg, TOW 266 kg, crew: 1
Additionally two single seat parasol aircraft with 300 hp Wright-Hispano engines are said to have been delivered to
the US-War Department under contract 344T during 1920

- V 41, two seat modification of a Fokker D.VII

- V 42, engineless glider, which could be used either with a wheeled landing gear or with floats. Test flight during 1919 and 1920.
Span: 8,50 m, length 5,00 m, wing area 10,5 sqm, empty weight 90 kg, TOW 165 kg, crew :1

- V 43, 1919, prototype for a parasol training aircraft, later in the netherlands designated as S.1.
span: 12,60 m, length 8,26 m, height 2,56 m, empty weight 609 kg, TOW 883 kg, crew: 2

- V 44, first design for a shoulder wing passenger aircraft for 5 passengers, still in an
open cabin, so not proceeded with.
span: 20,00 m, length 13,00 m, height 3,00 m, crew: 2

- V 45, 1919, prototype which later led to the F II passenger aircraft

- "Schleppgleiter" (towed glider), parasol wing glider, said to have been intended as flying bomb. The often mentioned
designation "V 30" certainly is wrong
 

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Jemiba

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-"Schleppflugzeug" (aircraft tug), mentioned as V 31, but this designations is said to have been assigned to
a parasol monoplane, whereas the photo shows a modified C 1.
 

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Jens, this is amazing! Thank you so much for starting this long-needed topic. I suggest we add the new pics to each entry you created when we find them.

As for the U.S. V-40 aircraft, these were the two PW-5 prototypes. They were followed by ten similar F.VI pursuits, also designated PW-5 (the "X" prefix for prototypes was not applied until 1924).
 

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Good stuff.​
Here is an explanation of the Fokker type letters as I provided to Aerofiles about 10 years ago.​
Type letters for Fokker aircraft originated in the German system for designating​
military aircraft, but further letters were added as required (*). Letters were used​
in combination with a sequential design number (initially in Roman numerals) in​
each type letter series. Several designs were exclusively used by the Fokker​
subsidiary in the USA.​
Fokker type letters were:​
B = Amphibian(*)​
C = General purpose​
D = Doppeldecker (Biplane Fighter), later Fighter​
Dr = Dreidecker (Triplane Fighter)​
E = Eindecker (Monoplane Fighter)​
F = Transport aircraft(*)​
G = Twin-engine fighter/bomber(*)​
K = Kampfflugzeug (Fighter)​
S = Trainer (*)​
T = Bomber(*)​
V = Versuchflugzeug (Experimental)​
W = Wasserflugzeug (Flying Boat)
 

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Jemiba said:
- Fokker "Spinne", 1910, monoplane built by Jacob Goedecker, first aircraft, which was at least partially designed by Anthony Fokker
- Fokker "Spinne 2", 1911, again built by Jacob Goedecker
- Fokker "Spinne [/size]3", 1911, first aircraft built by Fokker himself

I tripped over these since I've only seen the aircraft name rendered as 'Spin' (modern Dutch for 'spider'). Spinne is German for spider. Since Fokker resided in Germany at the time it wouldn't be impossible for him to have used a German name.
Then I came across http://www.luftfahrtarchiv.eu/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=80:fokker-a-1912-spinne&catid=34:germ-planes&Itemid=55, which stated that 'Spin' was a nickname given when Fokker demonstrated the aircraft in the Netherlands, in which case the name would be in Dutch.
And then again, I'm not too familiar with the Dutch spoken in 1911, but it's not impossible that they used spinne rather than spin back then.
So arguments either way and no definitive answer. Glad I could confuse matters B)
 

Jemiba

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The mentioned book doesn't really explain the origin of the name/nickname "Spinne", but maybe this
name goes back to Jacob Goedecker, who actually built Fokkers first aircraft .
 

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"Spinne" is not a Dutch word. It is German for "spider" but is also used figuratively to describe a rotary clothes line (I guess that the early Fokkers, with all their struts and wires, amply deserved the comparison!).
 

Jemiba

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The "Spinne" had a central pylon carrying the wing bracing wires, which so
looked like a spider from above.
 

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Very great work my dear Jemiba,


and here is some additions;


Spin-1912 (1st variant) two-seat trainer aircraft,powered by one 70 hp Argus.
Spin-1912 (2nd variant) derivative of Spin III with a nacelle-type fuselage seating
two in tandem as a trainer,powered by either 70 hp or
100 hp Argus.
Spin-1913 (1st variant) open fuselage two-seat trainer,powered by one 50 hp Argus inline.
Spin-1913 (2nd variant) with nacelle-type fuselage powered by one 100 hp Mercedes or
Argus inline,became M.1
Spin-1913 (3rd variant) similar to the 1913 2nd variant but powered by one 70 hp
Renault inline.
M.8 was a military version of the unsuccessful M.6 (service designation A.1).
V.14 was similar to V.12 but powered by one 160 hp Steyr-Le Rhone.
V.16 was developed from V.9 and powered by one 110 hp Oberursel Ur.II.
V.21 single-seat experimental biplane fighter with cantilever taper wing.
V.32 was a single seat fighter (no details).
 

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hesham

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From a book about Fokker aircraft,


here is a small info about M.11,M.12 & M.13,also V.14,15,19,31 & V.32.
 

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Jos Heyman

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I have a bit of difficulty with the German bits and pieces presented by Hesham, but I think I can add the following info that I have from a variety of other sources that are probably from a later source than the information dug up by Hesham:

V.14: is a 1918 development of the V.9
V.19: a monoplane with a 110 hp Le Rhone engines
V.31: a version of the D.VII to tow the V.30 glider.
 

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