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F-15 Global Ferry Range?

KJ_Lesnick

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According to the book "F-15 Eagle Engaged" by Steve Davies and Doug Dildy, it states on page 19 regarding the September 1968 RFP requirements for the F-X that the fighter was among other things to be capable of achieving "Global (intercontinental) ferry range with or without aerial refuelling"

The exact passage reads as follows (It's a caption on the right side of the page)

F-X Design Requirements

The September 1968 RFP required the F-X design submissions to
provide a fighter with:


1. Wing optimized for high load factor (g) and buffet-free
performance at Mach 0.9 at 30,000ft altitude;
2. High thrust-to-weight ratio to achieve very high energy
maneuverability throughout the flight envelope;
3. Mach 2.5 maximum speed at altitude;
4. Long-range pulse-Doppler radar with look-down capability;
5. One man operation of the weapons system for all missions;
6. Advanced cockpit layout, displays, and controls, which would
allow heads-up operation during close-in combat;
7. Airframe fatigue spectrum with a life of 4,000 hours;
8. 360 degree cockpit visibility;
9. High maintainability: 11.3 maintenance man hours per flight hour
(similar to WW2 fighter requirements);
10. Significant increase in avionic and airframe subsystem component
mean time between failure (MBTF);
11. Highly survivable structure, fuel, hydraulic, flight control and
electrical subsystems in a combat environment;
12. Self-contained engine starting without need for groupd support
equipment;
13. Global (intercontinental) ferry range with or without aerial
refuelling;

14. Maximum air superiority mission gross weight in the
40,000lb class;
15. Low development risk components (engine and radar) and
airframe subsystems which had been proven in prototype,
pre-production, or production applications.



Source: Steven, James Perry McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle, Aero
Publishers, Fallbrook, CA, 1978.

Bold Emphasis Mine


How long, distance-wise, would an airplane need to be able to fly for the US Military to consider it intercontinental or global? Could anybody venture a guess as to whether this range would be with drop-tanks or on just internal fuel?

Was the plane able to actually meet this specification?


KJ Lesnick
 

jsport

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Never a more timely requirement.

Hoping FA-XX is large enough. believe material science supports a decently maneuverable craft with a rather large payload.
 

Sundog

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KJ_Lesnick said:
According to the book "F-15 Eagle Engaged" by Steve Davies and Doug Dildy, it states on page 19 regarding the September 1968 RFP requirements for the F-X that the fighter was among other things to be capable of achieving "Global (intercontinental) ferry range with or without aerial refuelling"

The exact passage reads as follows (It's a caption on the right side of the page)

F-X Design Requirements

The September 1968 RFP required the F-X design submissions to
provide a fighter with:


1. Wing optimized for high load factor (g) and buffet-free
performance at Mach 0.9 at 30,000ft altitude;
2. High thrust-to-weight ratio to achieve very high energy
maneuverability throughout the flight envelope;
3. Mach 2.5 maximum speed at altitude;
4. Long-range pulse-Doppler radar with look-down capability;
5. One man operation of the weapons system for all missions;
6. Advanced cockpit layout, displays, and controls, which would
allow heads-up operation during close-in combat;
7. Airframe fatigue spectrum with a life of 4,000 hours;
8. 360 degree cockpit visibility;
9. High maintainability: 11.3 maintenance man hours per flight hour
(similar to WW2 fighter requirements);
10. Significant increase in avionic and airframe subsystem component
mean time between failure (MBTF);
11. Highly survivable structure, fuel, hydraulic, flight control and
electrical subsystems in a combat environment;
12. Self-contained engine starting without need for groupd support
equipment;
13. Global (intercontinental) ferry range with or without aerial
refuelling;

14. Maximum air superiority mission gross weight in the
40,000lb class;
15. Low development risk components (engine and radar) and
airframe subsystems which had been proven in prototype,
pre-production, or production applications.



Source: Steven, James Perry McDonnell Douglas F-15 Eagle, Aero
Publishers, Fallbrook, CA, 1978.

Bold Emphasis Mine


How long, distance-wise, would an airplane need to be able to fly for the US Military to consider it intercontinental or global? Could anybody venture a guess as to whether this range would be with drop-tanks or on just internal fuel?

Was the plane able to actually meet this specification?


KJ Lesnick

The range would be with drop tanks. Trying to do so on internal fuel alone would greatly drive up the size, hence weight and cost.
 

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