Effects of .50 up to 20mm guns on early WW2 tanks (so 1939-1940)

MichelKesin

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While researching some material for a diorama about the battle for Belgium, I noticed it was pretty hard to find fotos of tanks knocked out/disabled by smaller calibres, so I was wondering what some typical damage on a tank knocked out by calibres from about .50 to 20mm would be. The "victorious" tank in the diorama would be a Vickers T.15 Light tank (which had a 13.2mm machine gun), while the disabled tank would be an early panzer I or II. Any advice on what kind of damage one could expect in these types of engagements it would be very helpful. If you find any phot routerlogin os, (they don't have to be german tanks) just tanks knocked out or otherwise damaged damaged by smaller calibres.
 
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riggerrob

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Many nations started WW2 with .50 calibre or 20 mm anti-tank rifles. These were goo enough to shoot holes in early Panzer 1 and 2, but were soon out-classed by Panther, tiger, etc.
.5 calibre AT rifles remained in service as long-range anti-personnel rifles until the end of the war. For example, British Desert Rats retained Boys .55 AT rifles - on Universal Carriers - because they could dislodge rock shrapnel to make life miserable for German or Italian defenders.
Even at the end of the war, .5o cal. could still poke holes in tanks if fired at the rear face or down onto the top of the tank, where armor is thinner. Mind you, those angles are only relevant in close-quarter street fighting.
 

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