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Chinese Space Projects

merriman

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Yet, the grid-fins location above the classic Russian open structure to permit next stage start up while still matted to the preceding stage suggests that the fins are at the base of the second-stage. Am I missing something here? Or is that the trans-stage affixed to the first stage?
 

Michel Van

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Yet, the grid-fins location above the classic Russian open structure to permit next stage start up while still matted to the preceding stage suggests that the fins are at the base of the second-stage. Am I missing something here? Or is that the trans-stage affixed to the first stage?
Nope that is part of First stage, it's Interstage section
but here are opening for exhaust of Second stage engine, that ignited while first stage begin main engines shut down.
This "Shoot into Hole" procedure is failsafe, the Second stage engine can start up easier under acceleration of frist stage.
The Titan's rockets and allot Soviets rockets use that principle
 

Flyaway

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China successfully tests accurate landing of rocket debris

BEIJING, July 28 (Xinhua) -- China has successfully tested the technology that can accurately control the landing site of falling rocket parts, making progress toward reusable launch vehicles in the future, China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC) said on Sunday.

The CASC said that the test was carried out following a Long March-2C rocket launched on Friday, and focused on grid fins which are like "wings" on rocket core part to increase precision in control of its landing location.

According to experts from the CASC, the rocket' flight trajectory is designed to avoid densely populated areas. But after completing the mission, the rocket debris falls under no control with a wide range of landing points which sometimes involve inhabited areas.

In order to ensure the safety of people's lives and property, the currently practice is to evacuate people to the safety zone before each mission, which is not only inconvenient for the local people, but increases the cost and task difficulty.

The success of the test is of great significance for improving China's inland rocket landing safety, minimizing the inconvenience to the local people, as well as promoting the follow-up development of carrier rockets' controllable recovery, soft landing and reuse, according to He Wei, an official with the CASC.

"The swinging grid fins were used to control the rocket debris' direction and attitude, much like the wings of the debris," said Cui Zhaoyun, the deputy chief designer of Long March-2C rocket. The landing site control of large and medium rockets is much more difficult than that of small rockets, he added.

Source: Xinhua| 2019-07-29 00:06:36|Editor: yan

 

Flyaway

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The article includes various images that have turned up in different places from this mission.

At 14:08 UTC on 31 July, Longjiang-2, also known as DSLWP-B, passed behind the Moon for the last time. Half an hour later, with an absence of new signals to indicate a reappearance, it was clear that the Moon had lost an orbiter and gained a new crater on its far side. According to a prediction by Daniel Estévez, the 50-centimeter-tall, 47-kilogram DSLWP-B satellite impacted at 14:20 UTC.

Not to worry—this was a planned measure to prevent potential collisions or debris for future missions. A maneuver performed 24 January lowered the periapsis of the satellite’s lunar orbit by about 500 kilometers, with orbital perturbations over time seeing the satellite impacting the Moon Wednesday after 432 days in lunar orbit.
 

Michel Van

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LinkSpace founder and CEO Hu Zhenyu, (25-year-old) get his favor book sign by Robert Zubrin (the Chinese edition of Case for Mars)

 
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