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British Light/Civil Aircraft and Projects,Post WWI

Apophenia

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Mr. F. W. Broughton built a single seat parasol wing light monoplane,powered by one 30 hp Carden,developed from Perman Parasol,called Broughton-Blayney Brawney.
And all on offer for £195 apparently ;)

Actually, Frank William Broughton built three such Brawney monoplanes in late 1936. F.W. Broughton was also the designer of the earlier Perman Parasol (G-ADZX, aka the Perman Grasshopper).

The latter came from a collaboration with Mignet Flea-owner Edgar George Perman. That Flea, G-ADZX, was rebuilt into the sole Perman Parasol, flown by 23 May 1936 by A.E. Clouston. [1] Powerplant for the Parasol is usually listed as a Carden-Ford. It was actually a 'Perman-Ford' which I assume to mean a Carden-like conversion performed by E.G. Perman. The Perman Parasol met its end on 31 Jul 1937 in a hangar fire.

F.W. Broughton parted ways with Edgar Perman to join forces with Adolf Jarvis Blayney to form the Broughton Blayney Aircraft Co, Ltd. A.J. Blayney provided the finances and connections. Blayney was a director of Paddington-based T.H. Gill & Son Ltd., the custom auto-body makers who built the Brawney airframes.

The idea behind all of these aircraft was that no pilot's certificate was needed for aircraft weighting less than 600 lbs (the Brawney weighing only 450 lbs). Construction was begun on five Brawney airframes but only three were completed. All three of those were out of service within a year of being built:

21 March 1937, G-AENM (c/n BB/50) spun in at Hanworth Aerodrome, killing Alexander Scaife.

11 June 1937, G-AERF (c/n BB/51) crashed into Bromley Hill Cemetery, Catford, killing Alf Bacon.
-- https://www.airport-data.com/images/aircraft/001/165/001165043.jpg

22 Dec. 1937, G-AERG (c/n BB/52) withdrawn from use.

The Brawney powerplant was, of course, a converted Ford Model C Ten auto engine modified for aviation use by Carden Aero Engines Limited of Heston.

_______________________________

[1] In his autobiography, test pilot A.E. Clouston refers to both the Parasol and Brawney as the Clouston Midget. I'm not sure why. FW Broughton seemed happy to apply owners' names to airframes. But, AFAIK, Arthur Clouston never owned any of these aircraft.
 

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hesham

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From British Civil Aircraft since 1919,

here is a single seat low-wing ultra-light monoplane,designed by Mr. F. S. Barnwell,and called
B.S.W. MK.1.
 

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avion ancien

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Barnwell, not Branwell. Capt. Frank Barnwell was Bristol's chief designer, responsible for the Bristol Fighter, Bulldog and Blenheim, rather more notably than the rather primitive, underpowered ultralight in which he lost his life when, on its second flight, it stalled and dived in at Whitchurch - which, at the inquest into his death, was attributed to a lack of experience flying light aeroplanes (only a few hours in the preceding five years) - although some spoke of the BSW Mk. 1 as an accident waiting to happen..
 

avion ancien

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Apparently the Gunton Special was a single seat version of the Pietenpol Air Camper, powered by a 40hp ABC Scorpion engine. Construction was nearly complete when war broke out, as a result of which it was stored for the duration. Contrary to what Jackson says, Ord-Hume contends that no further work was undertaken by Bracewell, post-war, and the partly completed aeroplane was scrapped in February 1947.
 

hesham

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From British Civil Aircraft since 1919,

The de Bruyne aircraft.
 

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avion ancien

The accidental peasant!
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The Snark survived until about 1947, stored in the open at Burton Garage, Chippenham, Wiltshire. The Ladybird may survive today. It is said to have been stored in a barn in the Peterborough area since the outbreak of the last war. However there has been no report of it for decades but nor has there been any of its demise. Thus the story may be apocryphal.
Norman de Bruyne is perhaps more famous today for his glues than his aeroplanes!
 

hesham

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From British Civil Aircraft since 1919,

here is a Hinkler Ibis.
 

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avion ancien

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Although the original Ibis was scrapped in 1959, a full scale replica was built in Australia in 1987/88 and this is on display in the Hinkler museum at Bundaberg, Queensland.
 

hesham

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From British Civil Aircraft since 1919,

here is a Monoplane,designed by Mr. R. C. Howitt.
 

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hesham

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From British Civil Aircraft since 1919,

here is a Hordern-Richmond Autoplane
 

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Apophenia

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Salmon Tandem Monoplane light aircraft.


A bit of trivia: As Head of the Design Department at RAE, Percy Salmon also came up with the compressed air-driven catapult trialled on a Vickers Virginia in 1931.

 

hesham

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From British Civil Aircraft since 1919,

here is a McClure Aircraft.
 

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hesham

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From British Civil Aircraft since 1919,

here is a Wheeler Slymph light airplane.
 

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