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Boeing Vertol XCH-62A Heavy Lift Helicopter (HLH)

Triton

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Heavy Lift Helicopter - Advanced Technology Component Program - Rotor Blade Boeing Vertol Co September 1977

Abstract:
This report reviews the development of the Model 301 Heavy Lift Helicopter rotor blade. It describes the design, structural analysis, testing, and manufacturing process of the HLH rotor blade
Handle / proxy Url: http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA053423
 

Triton

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Artist's concept of the tandem rotor, three-engined, commercial version of the US Army's HLH, the Boeing-Vertol Model 301. The Model 301 could lift 35 tons at a time. It could be used to speed heavy construction work such as the transport and placing of huge bridge sections or precast concrete walls.

Source: "World's Heaviest Lifting Helicopter" Popular Mechanics September 1974
 

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Triton

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Artist's concept of Boeing Vertol XCH-62.

Source: Stepniewsk, Wieslaw; Keys, CN. Rotary-Wing Aerodynamics Dover 1979.
 

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Stargazer2006

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I'm sad to hear that the XCH-62 mockup was destroyed... I guess it was way too cumbersome for such a small piece of aviation history... though it could have been a milestone of Army aviation had it not been canceled.
 

Stargazer2006

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Barrington Bond said:
Does this belong here?!

Flug Revue+Flugwelt International 10/1969
Well, yeah, this depicts the ill-fated XCH-62A (HLH program) which was canceled before completion of the prototype. So both programs were connected from a technological viewpoint.
 

Triton

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Does anyone know if Boeing or the US Army considered any names for the XCH-62? Perhaps names of other Native American tribes or Native Americans in/from Washington state?
 

Stargazer2006

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Never heard of any. But if you consider the way the Army wasted beautiful names like Comanche or Cheyenne on canceled programs, it is likely that they prefer to hold on to the names until a program goes full fling. Most recent case was the H-70, which they finally named the Arapaho months into the program's progression... only to find it canceled.
 

Triton

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Names have been reused in other services with the addition of Roman numerals, why not in United States Army Aviation? There are also other Native American tribes and peoples and helicopters have been named for Native American leaders. I don't believe that the US Army will run out of names anytime soon.
 

robunos

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ISTR that the aircraft's role influences the name chosen, in that,
for example, an attack helicopter wil have the name of a warlike nation,
eg Apache, Comanche, Cheyenne, etc., whereas a rescue helo, or a
utility aircraft will have the name of a peaceful nation, eg Seminole,
or Chickasaw...


cheers,
Robin.
 

frank

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The UH-60 is named after Black Hawk, an Indian chief, not Blackhawk, as the Indian tribe as the S-67, often confused......

Triton said:
The Sikorsky CH-54 Tarhe was named for Tarhe (1742–1818) a leader of the Wyandot people in the Ohio country. He fought European-American expansion into the region until the Western Indian Confederacy was defeated at the Battle of Fallen Timbers in 1794.

Sources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tarhe
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CH-54_Tarhe
 

Triton

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Boeing XCH-62 model found on eBay. Manufacturer of the model is unknown.

[link no longer active]

Description:
UP FOR BID WITH "NO RESERVE" IS AN ULTRA RARE DESK MODEL OF THE HUGE EXPERIMENTAL HLH ( HEAVY LIFT) ARMY HELICOPTER CONCEIVED BY BOEING IN THE LATE 1970'S BUT WHICH NEVER FLEW OFF THE GROUND. THIS DESK MODEL WAS MADE FOR BOEING POSSIBLY BY TOPPING OR ROLEN AND DISTRIBUTED TO ARMY GENERALS AT THE PENTAGON.

THE MODEL IS IN PRISTINE CONDITION WITH NO MISSING PARTS THAT I CAN TELL NOR ANY CRACKS OR GLUED AREAS ANYWHERE. IT'S AWESOME TO LOOK AT AS IT IS DIFFERENT THAN OTHER HEICOPTERS WE ARE ACCUSTOMED TO SEE AROUND US.

THE MODEL IS LIKE NEW AND IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION EXCEPTING A COUPLE OF MINUTE CHIPS OFF THE DECALS AND COMES WITH 4 ROTOR BLADES AND A BLACK PLASTIC STAND. NOT SURE IF THE MODEL IS MADE OF PLASTIC OR FIBERGLASS, EITHER WAY IT'S AN OUTSTANDING MODEL TO OWN AND ADD TO ANY HELICOPTER COLLECTION. THIS ONE WAS PURCHASED ALMOST 20 YEARS AGO FROM A GOOD FRIEND PILOT (DECEASED)WHO CAPTAINED A GOLDEN DC9 OWNED BY THE LATE MALCOLM FORBES.

THE MODEL STANDS ABOUT 5 INCHES HIGH AT IT'S TAIL, APPROXIMATELY 4 INCHES WIDE AT IT'S WIDEST BODY SECTION CARRYING THE REAR WHEELS AND IS APPROXIMATELY 11 INCHES LONG. THE SCALE IS PRINTED ON THE STAND'S DECAL AS 1/96TH. A REAL GEM OF A MODEL AND VERY VERY UNUSUAL. I HAVE NOT SEEN ANOTHER ONE LIKE IT IN MY 35 YEARS OF COLLECTING HELIS EXCEPTING ONE (1) EXAMPLE AT THE HELICOPTER MUSEUM IN VIRGINIA.
 

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Triton

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Boeing XCH-62 model found on eBay. Manufacturer of the model is unknown.

[link no longer active]
 

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Caravellarella

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Dear Boys and Girls, here is a little feature on the plans for a Boeing-Vertol HLH "project" alongside a Boeing tilt-wing "project"......

The HLH has three turboshaft engines located in front of the rear rotor pylon and a faired or "trousered" main undercarriage......

The feature comes from the 1st September 1969 issue of Aviation Magazine International......

(Moderators, should I be posting this here or on http://www.secretprojects.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,565.0/highlight,hlh.html ?)

Terry (Caravellarella)
 

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Stargazer2006

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Cool painting of the HLH, one of my pet helo projects! Thanks for sharing.

Second image is well-known and depicts the LIT (Light Intratheater Transport) which is discussed elsewhere on this forum.
 

Caravellarella

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Stargazer2006 said:
Cool painting of the HLH, one of my pet helo projects! Thanks for sharing.
Stéphane, here is a picture from the year before of another version of the Boeing-Vertol HLH design......

The picture comes from the 1st September 1968 issue of Aviation Magazine International......

Terry (Caravellarella)
 

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Mark Nankivil

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Greetings All -

http://cgi.ebay.com/BOEING-XCH-62A-Army-Crane-Helicopter-Photo-Vintage-/270759565983?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f0a871a9f

Enjoy the Day! Mark
 

Triton

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Seller's description:
BOEING XCH-62A Prototype Giant Helicopter Photo Print. Neat Old Print .Printed on Photographic paper MECOM 73 stamped on back Measures "11x "14 would look awesome framed. Assume all the signatures are from BOEING engineers at the plant. This thing was a true GIANT. Max gross over 110,000 over 24,000 hp of engines. Length: 87 ft 3 in (26.59 m) (overall fuselage length) Height: 32 ft 3 in (9.83 m) (to top of pylon) Empty weight: 59,580 lb (27,025 kg) Gross weight: 118,000 lb (53,524 kg) Powerplant: 3 × Allison T701-AD-700 turboshaft, 8,080 hp (6,030 kW) each Main rotor diameter: 2× 92 ft 0 in (28.04 m) Main rotor area: 13,260 sq ft (1,232 m2) Maximum speed: 145 kn (167 mph; 269 km/h) with external load Combat range: 150 nmi (170 mi; 280 km) Ferry range: 1,500 nmi (1,700 mi; 2,800 km) The Boeing Vertol XCH-62 (Model 301) was a three turbine-engined, heavy-lift helicopter project designed for the United States Army by Boeing Vertol. Approved in 1971, only one aircraft was built before it was cancelled in 1974. An attempt by NASA to resurrect the program was aborted in 1983.
 

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Triton

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Photographs of Boeing-Vertol XCH-62.

Sources:
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/aircraft/h-62-pics.htm
http://cavok.com.br/blog/?p=2080
http://nhungdoicanh.blogspot.com/2010/12/boeing-vertol-xch-62.html
http://kr.blog.yahoo.com/acftacft/2997
 

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Antonio

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Are you sure that "C6041" is a project identification

In eBay we can read:

Boeing’s Heavy Lift Concept Matted Print Poster

· Says “The Boeing Company – Vertol Division C6041” under the right hand corner of the picture
I have my doubts
 

Stargazer2006

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Actually I'm SURE it's NOT a project number. It's totally useless to include it in this topic's title!
 

Stargazer2006

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General arrangement and text excerpts about the Model 301 by Boeing Vertol (source):

Vehicle Description
The Boeing Vertol Model 301 is a heavy lift helicopter (HLH) designed to provide vertical airlift capability for large and heavy loads. As originally designed, it was configured as a 'crane' helicopter primarily designed to lift external loads such as standard shipboard container modules, slings, platforms or special pods. For study purposes, a civil transport version of the Model 301 also was investigated. This transport configuration would have a larger fuselage with the capability of transporting 140 passengers in a 7-abreast, dual-aisle airline arrangement. Although similar in many ways, each helicopter has sufficient differences to be treated separately for the crane and transport configurations.
The heavy lift helicopter, described in this section, is the result of an intensive design study performed for the U.S. Army. The HLH rotor system was assembled and whirled on both a rotor tower as well as an integrated powerplant/drive system test facility (DSTR) which included one rotor, transmissions, and engines.

Model 301 Crane
The Boeing Vertol Model 301 crane is a tandem rotor shaft-driven helicopter powered by three T701-AD-700 gas turbine engines of 8079 HP each. It provides a vertical airlift capability for loads carried externally beneath the fuselage utilizing either a single or two point suspension system. The crew compartment accommodates a pilot, copilot, flight engineer and load controlling crewman. A combination troop/light cargo compartment is aft of the crew compartment. Aft of the troop compartment, the center section contains the cargo handling equipment in the forward and aft positions. Each of the two hoists are located in this section.
The main rotors are four-bladed and operate at 156 RPM (750 fps tip speed). A fly-by-wire flight control system has been incorporated in the aircraft.

Model 301 Transport
The Boeing Vertol Model 301 transport, like the crane, is a tandem rotor, three engine helicopter. It has the same drive system and rotor as the crane, but the airframe is configured to transport 140 passengers. The load controllers cab and associated flight controls, etc. have been removed.

Noise Sources
Model 301 flyover noise levels have been estimated using measured test rig data as well as predirtive methodology. Noise levels were based on: (1) measurements of an HLH rotor on a whirl tower, (2) data obtained on the dynamic system test rig, (3) comparison with flyover noise levels measured on the Boeing Vertol Model 347 (similar rotor geometry to the Model 301), and (4) analytical predictions.
The basic approach to estimating Model 301 flyover EPNL was to relate it to Model 347 flyover data since overlap and rotor configuration are similar on the two helicopters. Therefore, PNL flyover time histories were assumed to have similar characteristics, although absolute levels differed.
Since rotor geometry, powerplants, drive system and gross weight are similar on the crane and transport configuration, noise sources are similar. Configuration changes on the transport rotor system also are the same as those for the crane.
 

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Stargazer2006

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Boeing Vertol considered some modifications to improve on the Model 301. Here are some text excerpts and diagrams (same source as above):

Model 301 Crane

Configuration Changes - Tradeoff Variables

The modification includes new rotor blades, modified cockpit vibration absorbers, a new gear ratio for the generators and acoustically lined engine inlets.

Impact of Design Changes on Performance, Weight and Cost Performance
As noted for the CH-47, the 301 is a derivative of a military helicopter. At a gross weight of 118,000 pounds reductions in rotor speed to 141 RPM (681 ft/sec) are within the capability of the existing airframe and dynamic system.
In addition, at a mission radius of 3 nautical miles, for example, reduction of tip speed from 750 ft/sec to 681 ft/sec reduces rotor power required and SFC, effectively increasing
the number of sorties from 37 to-40. A reduction in payload of approximately 9000 pounds is associated with this rotor speed reduction, however, limiting the payload to 41,000 pounds. This represents a reduction in payload of 18 percent. Obviously, payloads in excess of 41,000 pounds would be the only loads affected.

Weight
The modification to the crane version of the Model 301 increases weight empty from 62,120 pounds to 63,534 pounds, an increase of 1414 pounds. This is comprised of an additional 643 pounds due to increased blade chord, 150 pounds for the retuned vibration absorbers and 621 pounds resulting from the lined engine inlet plenum area.

Cost
For the cost study, the mission of the Model 301 crane was based on 2.3 statute mile sortie as defined in the 'performance' section, cruising outbound at 90 knots to a work area. The hover pickup of load and inbound cruise, hover and deposit of load results in a block speed of approximately 49 mph.
Since the crane is designed to carry external loads, not passengers, the cost study was based on ton-mile rather than seat-mile costs. Ton-mile costs were developed from air-mile costs divided by the payload which is a function of tip speed. Thus, at a tip speed of 750 fps payload was approximately 25 tons while at 680 ft/sec the payload was reduced to 21 tons.

The Model 301 crane was considered to be a 'new' helicopter for this study with the implied assumption that nonrecurring costs were spread over the entire production base. This production base was assural over a range of 50 to 1000 units to display the effect which this varifebifi has on operating costs.
Modification 1 to the baseline crane configuration results in a 3 EPNdB reduction in flyover noise. Air-mile costs remain essentially unchanged as a result of the configuration change to the crane. However, the reduction in rotor tip speed from 750 to 685 ft/sec results in a reduction in payload from 25 tons to 21 tons resulting in a tonmile cost increase by 17-19.7 percent. If crane payload had been 21 tons or less initially, no increase in ton-mile costs would be incurred due to the reduced tip speed of Modification 1.

Reductions in flyover EPNL below that defined by Modification 1 did not appear to be achievable. A reduction in tip speed to 650 ft/sec with the increased solidity main rotor blade showed only a 1 dB reduction in Perceived Noise Level. Further reductions in rotor noise are not apparent for this 90 foot diameter rotor. Additional research is required in the area of broadband noise reduction of large rotors.


Model 301 Transport

Impact of Design Changes on Performance, Weight and Cost Performance
The transport mission is a two minute warmup at maximum continuous power and takeoff at sea level-standard day conditions, climbing to 2000 feet and cruising out at 99 percent optimum range and landing with a 45 minute fuel reserve for a 99 percent optimum range cruise speed. For the transport gross weight of 118,000 pounds which includes 25,000 pounds fuel and 140 passengers and baggage at 200 pounds each, no impact on pay load is noted to tip speeds of 665 ft/sec. Below this rotor speed, the number of passengers or fuel load would be reduced by a requirement to maintain a 35 degree band angle maneuver. Modification 1 operates at 681 ft/sec, which is within this limit.
Lower rotor power required results in an increase in cruise speed from 138 kt to 151 kt, a 9 percent increase. Similarly, the range increases from 417 to 545 nautical miles, an increase of 14 percent.

Weight
The weight empty of the transport increases by 1594 pounds for Modification 1, from 64,638 to 66,232 pounds. Note that for the transport, cockpit vibration absorber weight has been reduced to 100 pounds to reflect the deletion of the load controller's station. In addition, the floor isolation system must be retuned for Modification 1 to the baseline helicopter, adding 112 pounds to weight empty.

Cost
The mission of the Model 301 transport for this study as defined in the performance section consisted of a 100 seat mile flight at a cruise speed of 138 knots. This cruise speed represents 99 percent best range speed. Block speed associated with this is 125.8 knots. The transport configuration seats 140 passengers resulting in a design gross weight of 118,000 pounds. This gross weight is well below the engine torque limits for all rotor speeds, and the reduced tip speed of the Modification 1 configuration does not limit the transport payload capability.

The Model 301 transport was considered to be a 'new' helicopter for this program with all nonrecurring costs spread over the entire production base. As for the other aircraft in the study, the production base was evaluated over a range of 50 to 1000 units to determine the effect which this variable has on operating costs.
Changes in air mile costs resulting from Modification 1 changes to the transport version of the Model 301 produce only minimal changes in direct operating costs. As a 'new' aircraft, only those changes to the transport which incur additional material costs result in an increase in direct operating cost, since all nonrecurring is similar for both configurations. The additional material is in the wider chord blades, engine plenum acoustical linings, the retuned vibration absorbers in the cockpit and cabin floor and the fuel isolation system.
Further reductions in rotor noise for a rotor of this diameter (90 feet) are not apparent. Additional research is required to reduce the broadband component of large rotors.
Several cases of rotational and broadband noise evaluation showed that reduction in rotor speed alone without other rotor modifications resulted in no reduction in Perceived Noise Level for that rotor. This stemmed from an increasing average rotor lift coefficient as rotor speed was reduced having the effect of increasing broadband noise. The result was generally offsetting noise trends between rotational and broadband noise. Only when blade chord was increased did both rotational and broadband noise decrease.
 

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yasotay

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A sad footnote to the history of the XCH-62. There was a meeting going on concerning the Joint Heavy Lift project (the latest doomed heavy lift effort), when we got word that the XCH-62 at Ft. Rucker was being destroyed as we sat there. The meeting immediately went on break and a number of us drove over to the demolition site. After a couple of minutes of talking with the contractor (who was baffled why anyone would want to rummage around in scrap metal), we secured the ident plates, sticks & grips, along with the huge external hook that would have picked up howitzers.
 

Stargazer2006

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yasotay said:
A sad footnote to the history of the XCH-62. There was a meeting going on concerning the Joint Heavy Lift project (the latest doomed heavy lift effort), when we got word that the XCH-62 at Ft. Rucker was being destroyed as we sat there. The meeting immediately went on break and a number of us drove over to the demolition site. After a couple of minutes of talking with the contractor (who was baffled why anyone would want to rummage around in scrap metal), we secured the ident plates, sticks & grips, along with the huge external hook that would have picked up howitzers.
A petty consolation I guess, but at least they didn't go to waste. Thanks for sharing this contrasted memory!
 

Bill S

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http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Boeing-Vertol-Army-Heavy-Lift-Helicopter-Technology-Department-Manual-/231327917068?pt=Motors_Manuals_Literature&hash=item35dc37e40c
 

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