• Hi Guest! Forum rules have been updated. All users please read here.

Boeing 752 airliner

Triton

Donald McKelvy
Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2009
Messages
9,723
Reaction score
330
Website
deeptowild.blogspot.com
Model of Boeing 752 airliner concept located at the Boeing Archives Bellevue, Washington.

This awkward aircraft, the Boeing 752, with its unusual narrow body fuselage and tail mounted mid-engine never made it pass the drawing board
Source:
http://airchive.com/html/museums/boeing-archives-bellevue-washington-usa/boeing-752-tri-jet-study-model/19102
 

Attachments

Maveric

Fight for yor Right!
Joined
Jan 14, 2007
Messages
1,885
Reaction score
237
Do you know some technical data?
 

taildragger

You can count on me - I won a contest
Joined
Nov 2, 2008
Messages
240
Reaction score
106
Recently purchased, from the Island of Unwanted Toys section of eBay, a Boeing factory model also labeled Model 752. Other than a similar paint job, the common elements between the two configurations seem to be a highly swept wing (about 42 degrees) and the forward-projecting engine nacelles. I'd guess that 752 was a broad program to investigate the highly swept wing and unusual engine mount rather than a specific configuration.
Other notable details:
3 x triple axle landing gear bogies. The fuselage is so low to the ground that center landing gear wheels don't fully leave the landing gear well when extended. The rear axles of each bogie is raised, suggesting that someone dropped the model or that the trucks are hinged, as on the 777, to limit tire wear due to scrubbing.
Twin lobed fuselage with the larger lower lobe featuring passenger windows and doors along the entire useful length. There are no cargo doors represented, although these decals could have rubbed off, leaving a mystery as to where the luggage and cargo was supposed to go.

IMG_1402aaa.JPGIMG_1404aaaaa.JPGIMG_1405aaaaaa.JPGIMG_1407.JPGIMG_1411aa.JPGIMG_1411aaaa.JPG
The spanwise engine placement looks similar to early 747 configurations, suggesting that the model may date to the mid 60's.
Does anyone know:
- When did the 752 program exist and how did it relate to the 747?
- What, if anything, does it mean in Boeing practice to assign a sequential number to a model vs a placeholder in the 7x7 series (7X7, 7N7, 7J7, 7E7, etc.)?
- What were the hoped-for advantages provided by the forward-projecting engine nacelles?
 
Last edited:

galgot

CLEARANCE: Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Jul 6, 2006
Messages
650
Reaction score
412
Website
galgot.com
Thks for showing this very interesting model. Sorry, i have no awnsers to your questions, i've too been wondering what is the logic ( if there is any) behind these designations.
Plus, what is the thing with Boeing and number 7 ??
 

FXXII

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Sep 3, 2018
Messages
20
Reaction score
7
Is the split engine exhaust meant to improve lift by the blown-flap configuration?
 

Wyvern

CLEARANCE: Confidential
Joined
Jan 25, 2020
Messages
150
Reaction score
106
Thks for showing this very interesting model. Sorry, i have no awnsers to your questions, i've too been wondering what is the logic ( if there is any) behind these designations.
Plus, what is the thing with Boeing and number 7 ??

I believe it had something to do with their designation system. All numbers between 700-799 were reserved for jet aircraft. The Boeing 707 was originally going to be called the Boeing 700, however, one of the engineers thought that 707 sounded better, and it was implemented, remaining an all products besides the Boeing 720. At least, that's how the story goes.
 
Top