Baumann Two Aircraft Projects

hesham

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Hi,

Mr. Jack Baumann who designed a Brigadier,it was a pusher twin engined light transport shoulder-
wing monoplane,its variants was B-250 7 B-290,but he planned anther two Projects,B-360 Brigadier
was a version with 180 hp (130 kW) Lycoming engines,and B-480 Super Brigadier was an enlarged
version with 240 hp (180 kW) Continental O-470 engines,has anyone a drawings to them ?.


 

riggerrob

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According to Wikipedia, Jack Bauman founded his company in California during 1945. He only built two prototypes. They were 5 seater executive transports with cantilever, shoulder wings and pusher propellers.
The Bauman 250 prototype had a pair of 125 horsepower engines, hence 250 total horsepower and hence the name. The similar Bauman 290 had a pair of 145 hp engines turning pusher propellers.
In most other respects, Bauman's prototypes resembled contemporary Aero Commander light twins.
One of Bauman's prototypes (probably the first) got a new set of wings and became the flying prototype of the Custer Channel Wing STOL airplane.
 

riggerrob

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Sory Hesham,
But I was not able to find any drawings of Bauman's airplanes, a total of four designs.
There are a few photos on Wikipedia, aerofiles, jetwhine, etc.
If you want to kit-bash, start with an Aero Commander model.

Jack Bauman founded his company in California during 1945. He built a pair of similar, light twin prototypes: the 250 and 290. They were mid-wing, 5-seater light twins with pusher propellers. The 250 had a pair of 125 horsepower engines while the Bauman 290 had a pair of 145 hp engines spinning two-bladed pusher propellers. In most other respects, they resembled contemporary Aero Commander light twins.
Bauman rebuilt one prototype (probably the first) with a new set of wings to test Custer's Channel WingSTOL concepts. Ironically, as many photos of the Custer Channel Wing survive as there are of Bauman's prototypes.
At one point, Piper tried to buy Bauman's design, but he stuck stubbornly to his pusher configuration, so Piper bought a light twin prototype form Stinston and developed that in to the Aztec and Apache lines.
 

Apophenia

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... Jack Bauman founded his company in California during 1945...

Too true ... but note the correct name spelling -- the Baumann Aircraft Corporation. There was also a Knoxville, TN-based Baumann Aircraft Corp. from 1938-1940 which became the Mercury Aircraft Corp. of Menominee, MI, from 1940-1942. So, Jack B. Baumann had a number of prewar and early WW2 designs as well.

(BTW, I'm working up a Baumann designation list. Does anyone have any details on the Lacy-Baumann glider (NC11539) or Velie radial-powered Baumann-Minsky B (NC18151)?)

Baumann trained at the University of Tennessee before going to work at the Taylor-Young Airplane Company (Taylorcraft, Alliance, OH) where he designed his first aircraft - the B-65 - on the side. After leaving Mercury Aircraft, he went briefly to Frankfort Sailplane Company (Joliet, IL, under Stanley Corcoran) before heading west to Lockheed. AFAIK, the 1945 Baumann Aircraft Corporation was a sideline - perhaps explaining why various sources list this firm's location as Burbank (NASM), North Hollywood (Flight), Pacoima (an LA neighbourhood), or Santa Barbara (95 miles up the coast)!

... At one point, Piper tried to buy Bauman's design, but he stuck stubbornly to his pusher configuration, so Piper bought a light twin prototype form Stinston and developed that in to the Aztec and Apache lines.

The Apache story is a bit convoluted. Piper bought the B-250 Brigadier prototype, drawings, and rights in July 1949. The Piper Aircraft Corporation wanted a merger with Baumann Aircraft Corporation (with combined operations at Piper's facility at Lock Haven, PA). As riggerbob said, Baumann was stuck on the pusher configuration whereas Piper planners favoured a tractor-engined light twin. The merger was cancelled and a compromise approach was agreed.

Under the revised plan, Baumann Aircraft Corporation held the right to further develop the Brigadier as a pusher but agreed not to pursue a tractor-propeller variant. Meanwhile, Piper would follow their preference and evolve a tractor-engined derivative of the Brigadier. On 30 August 1949, the Piper designation PA-21 was assigned to this tractor Brigadier project. However, in meantime, the Stinson Division of Convair had been bought by Piper Aircraft Corporation.

The Stinson buy-out gave Piper access to another light twin design - the rather unimaginitively named Stinson Twin Stinson. Designed circa 1948 and introduced in 1952, the Twin Stinson was a low-winged, twin-tailled 4-seater with a fabric-covered fuselage. It was powered by two 135 hp Lycoming O-290-D-2s ... so had slightly more power than the B-250 but was otherwise rather dated. Piper engineers decided that combining features from the planned PA-21 and the Twin Stinson would give them everything they wanted in a light twin. Accordingly a new semi-monocoque fuselage and single tail fin and rudder were designed based on the B-250/PA-21 airframe. These components were mated to the Twin Stinson low wings, nacelles, and tricycle undercarriage to produce the first PA-23 Apache with 150 hp Lycoming O-320-A HO4s.
 
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