Avro Type 550

Bailey

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I have the following information from two sources on this project, and I'm trying to sort out which if either is correct. If anyone can provide further comments, I'd be very grateful.

From Avro Aircraft Since 1908 - A.J.Jackson - Putnam.

"Avro 550 - Earmarked either for a projected 3 seat Fleet Reconnaissance Triplane to Specification 37/22, or a European Civil Transport with 3 Rolls-Royce Condors to Specification 40/22."

From The British Aircraft Specification File - K.J.Meekcoms & E.B.Morgan - Air Britain.

"37/22 - The Avro Type 550 Amphibian Triplane design was for a single-bay, uniformly-staggered, narrow-chord triplane, with a gap between the centre plane above the two forward cockpits. The middle and upper wings were supported at their inboard ends by extended splayed cabane struts, and the outer ends of the three planes supported by single faired interplane struts. The oval section fuselage was positioned between the two lower planes, tapering to a monoplane tailplane and comma-shaped rudder. A twin-float undercarriage, with built-in wheels, was fitted. The aircraft was powered by a Bristol Jupiter engine. The type was not built."

Thanks in advance for any help, regards Bailey.
 

lark

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Maybe this helps..

550 Not used,but reserved for reconnaissance triplane
to Spec.37/22

551 Civil version of Type 550 with accommodation for fifteen
passengers.Power was to be three Rolls-Royce Condor 600hp engines.

source: Avro:The history of an Aircraft Company-Harry Holmes.Airlife 1994
 

Bailey

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lark said:
Maybe this helps..

550 Not used,but reserved for reconnaissance triplane
to Spec.37/22

551 Civil version of Type 550 with accommodation for fifteen
passengers.Power was to be three Rolls-Royce Condor 600hp engines.

source: Avro:The history of an Aircraft Company-Harry Holmes.Airlife 1994

Thanks for the feedback Lark :D

The comment about the Type 550 itself makes sense, as does Type 551 for the Civil Airliner. What I do find surprising is that the 551 should be a civil version of the 550. I would have thought of the 550 as being a much smaller aircraft. What might make sense is if the Type 551 was originally allocated to a single engine version, which is what Specification 40/22 called for. See the D.H.54 Highclere which was the only aircraft actually built to 40/22. Imperial Airways did later change their mind, to insist on multi-engine aircraft.

Thanks also for providing the source....another tome to add to my already large wanted book list B)

Regards Bailey.
 

lark

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Interesting to see that this was a single engined
design just as the DH.54.

By the way,the Avro book I mentioned haves a 2e
edition with much more information and new illustrations.
Produced by Crowood.Same author.
 

memaerobilia

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Bailey said:
I wonder how close the "Type 550" was in relation to the Type 547.
Apparently not very much, other than being a triplane..

The Avro Type 550 Amphibian Triplane design was for:
-a single-bay,/vs. double bay
-uniformly-staggered, narrow-chord triplane,/vs no stagger
-with a gap between the centre plane above the two forward cockpits./vs. no gap
-The middle & upper wings supported at their inboard ends by splayed cabane struts,/vs. vertical cabanes
-and the outer ends of the three planes supported by single faired interplane struts./vs. double interplane struts
-The aircraft was powered by a Bristol Jupiter engine./400-500hp vs 160 hp Beardmore
 

Bailey

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memaerobilia said:
Apparently not very much, other than being a triplane..

I agree....but only if we believe the description of the 550 given above is totally correct. :D I've no cross reference to confirm it. :'(

Regards Bailey.
 

Bailey

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Bailey said:
I agree....but only if we believe the description of the 550 given above is totally correct.

What bothers me, rightly or wrongly is that the description of the "Type 550" as a Carrier reconnaissance plane does not seem to gel with the style of designs that Avro were producing for other Navy planes to similar specs at around the same time.

See the drawings of the Bison from 1921 and the Buffalo from 1923.

Regards Bailey.
 

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