airship projects until 1945

airman

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I have updated my first post with a report about a project of civil airship of Schutte Lanze after wwi !!!
 

PMN1

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Vickers Transoceanic


1919/1920

Gross Gas Capacity 3,500,000 cft Length: 800ft Diameter: 100ft

Max speed: 75mph Cruising speed 52mph

Endurance at max speed: 75 hours/5,600 miles Endurance at cruising speed: 200 hours/ 10,0000miles

Passengers: 100

Passenger accommodation on top of the airship.

Not sure about that open air shelter deck....

Vickpassplan1 1919.gif


Vickers4.jpg

Vickers3.jpg

Vickers2.jpg
 
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PMN1

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Another interesting thing about this project is the optimism of the lift - 3,500,000 cu ft and 100 passengers.

When R100 and R101 were built it was quickly realised they were too small at 5,000,000 of so cu ft and the R102 design was looking at 7,500,000 cu ft for 50 passengers and 5 tons of freight and R103 even bigger.
 

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Here's British Pathe / Gaumont Graphic Newsreel footage of an airship that never quite flew, but is certainly interesting, the Slate Aircraft Corporation metal airship, named "City of Glendale."

As per the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum (NASM), accompanying the photo attached below:
Captain Thomas Slate financed his all-metal dirigible, the City of Glendale, from the money he made in the dry ice / refrigeration business. Construction of the dirigible started in the summer of 1926 and the work was completed in early 1929, The dirigible was made out of duralumin and was filled with hydrogen. It was forecast to have a cruising speed of 80 mph and would accommodate 40 passengers and five crew. The dirigible was to be powered by oil and driven by steam-turbine, using one rotary blower, which would create a vacuum, instead of traditional propellers. Though completed in 1929, the airship never flew, in part to the stock market crash that closed the company.
A Wikipedia page on Metal-Clad Airships (link), cites to a February 17, 1929 issue of Flight ("The Slate All-Metal Airship") in providing a description for the aircraft:
Slate All-Metal Airship
The 1929 Slate All-Metal Airship, built in Glendale, California, had a hull constructed from corrugated aluminum panels, along with a revolutionary propulsions system consisting of a "blower" at the nose of the airship which would propel the vehicle forward by creating a partial vacuum ahead of the vessel. The centrifugal propulsion was later replaced by a conventional engine and propeller mounted on the tail end of the airship's gondola. The rolled seams intended to hold the panels together subsequently unrolled owing to gas pressure created by superheating during an attempted launch of the airship.
YouTube - British Pathé: "USA / AVIATION: Unusual airship or blimp with metal covering from Slate Aircraft Inc." (1929)
For additional information, here is a fine web page that goes into the Slate airship in detail:
Vintage Air: "Slate's Strange Dirigible" (Tuesday, August 20, 2013), by Alan Radecki
 

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