A novel about another timeline

Resister1976

ACCESS: Confidential
Joined
Apr 10, 2021
Messages
54
Reaction score
37
My best friend shared it with me,its name is "Knight,Dragon and WALTZ",I read it.
It is interesting but not finished,that's a pity for its reader.
Here's a map of novel settings.
(Brief place name translation:“瓦拉几亚” means Wallachia,“希尔达维亚” means Syldavia.)
b9a26ab8-a05d-43cd-9ac8-129e63bb599d.jpg
 

Foo Fighter

I came, I saw, I drank some tea (and had a bun).
Senior Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Messages
2,974
Reaction score
1,829
Another type of book promotion it seems.
 

Archibald

ACCESS: Above Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2006
Messages
8,983
Reaction score
8,601
Syldavia ? that's Tintin worst ennemy. With Borduria. These two are like Chaplin's Bacteria and Tomania - and just like The Great dictator, Hergé drew from Anschluss 1938 horror when writting his comic book.

Wallachia... well, it existed for real. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallachia
 

klem

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Mar 7, 2015
Messages
438
Reaction score
714
Wallachia the country of Vlad Dracula, if Draco turns into a bat and flies then he has a connection with aviation but in another way, on SPF - even in the section Alternative History and Future Speculation, I don't know ?
 

Archibald

ACCESS: Above Top Secret
Senior Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2006
Messages
8,983
Reaction score
8,601
My pleasure ! I loved the werepups, that weapon of mass destruction. Plus Wayne and Wanda Werewolf.
 

klem

I really should change my personal text
Joined
Mar 7, 2015
Messages
438
Reaction score
714
It's true, they are completely hilarious.
 

Dilandu

I'm dissatisfied, which means, I exist.
Joined
May 30, 2013
Messages
2,394
Reaction score
2,261
Website
fonzeppelin.livejournal.com
My best friend shared it with me,its name is "Knight,Dragon and WALTZ",I read it.
It is interesting but not finished,that's a pity for its reader.
Here's a map of novel settings.
(Brief place name translation:“瓦拉几亚” means Wallachia,“希尔达维亚” means Syldavia.)
Could you please provide any kind of preview?
 

bloody sky

ACCESS: Confidential
Joined
Sep 3, 2021
Messages
86
Reaction score
82
My best friend shared it with me,its name is "Knight,Dragon and WALTZ",I read it.
It is interesting but not finished,that's a pity for its reader.
Here's a map of novel settings.
(Brief place name translation:“瓦拉几亚” means Wallachia,“希尔达维亚” means Syldavia.)
Could you please provide any kind of preview?
wait a moment
 

bloody sky

ACCESS: Confidential
Joined
Sep 3, 2021
Messages
86
Reaction score
82
My best friend shared it with me,its name is "Knight,Dragon and WALTZ",I read it.
It is interesting but not finished,that's a pity for its reader.
Here's a map of novel settings.
(Brief place name translation:“瓦拉几亚” means Wallachia,“希尔达维亚” means Syldavia.)
Could you please provide any kind of preview?

Chapter 1: If a high school student can't even fly an orange body, he's already lost (I)

3582 A.H. (1999 A.D.)

Sunday, 5 June

"Grandpa, you can't come back at noon today, you'll have to prepare your own lunch." Corporal Kovacs Hammer Navy Reserve placed a can of luncheon meat on the dining table.

"Don't fool me with this dubious meat crap! If you're too lazy to make beef stew just say so and I won't chastise you, you're only at school for three and a half hours in the morning even if you have compulsory self-study on Sundays, don't think I'm old and confused! Soldiers don't lie!"

"You're really old fashioned, old Commander Kovacs." Hammer thought about it, but didn't say anything, "Well, there's a flight test at noon and afternoon after extra lessons, and you don't want your precious granddaughter to end up with a zero on her first solo flight just to get you back for beef stew."

"You didn't tell me earlier? Soldiers mustn't cover up!" The old man's mildly cataracted eyes instantly glowed with a layer of vapid glory, "Ha! God, I finally know the reason you've kept me alive so long, my granddaughter is going to be a fighter pilot in the Duchy of Syldavia's Naval Air Force!"

"Just a National Air Defence volunteer!" I don't love planes more than my wife and daughter like my old man, and I wouldn't have signed up for flying lessons if it wasn't for you two."

"You and your dad have old man's blood running through you, don't I understand?"

"Come on, come on, don't cry if I fall, goodbye grandpa." Hanmer put on his school bag and opened the door to his room.

"Don't say bad words, son, 30 knots of deck wind bless you!"

"Thirty knots of deck wind" was a blessing that no one but the pilots of the Duchy's naval airlines understood, the equivalent of a "good trip" in common parlance, as a pilot flying off the deck of a carrier into a tailwind could be a fatal The

......

With school bags on their backs, they climbed up the long banzai road, and the school was at the top of this hill.

"Stand up! Salute the Lord God! After saluting, sit."

"Hey, Kautaurene, aren't you awake ......"

"Homework was up until 2:30 >_< Teacher can't you be considerate ......"

Sunday morning is a time of worship for the people of Syldavia, and people up and down the country are at this time immersed in silence and devotion by putting aside their chores - except for secondary school students.

As a country with a large population, it is not easy for high school students in Syldavia to get into a proper university, and although the state mandates a five-day work and study week with two days off, the headmasters of the major private high schools all add an extra day on Saturday in the pursuit of promotion, and the general increase in student performance only further forces the universities to raise their scores, so the headmasters set their sights on Sunday ......

"Ah ...... Teacher I also grade papers until three o'clock ah, anyway bear with me."

The saying "Lawyers in the Atlantic Federation, farmers in the Eurasian Empire, high school students in the Principality of Syldavia - the three most miserable professions in the world" has been around the world for a long time.

......

"Hey Hammer, lend me a hand with yesterday's Mandarin homework."

......

"Ignore me? ...... Hammerhead, sledgehammer ......"

......

"Is that the wrong way for me to open it ...... So, little hammer hammer ......"

"Little you hammer!!!"

"So you can hear me, why are you ignoring me ......"

"Ferencz and Hammer you two are so close ...... I'm so jealous."

"I can't help it, even the best of lovebirds have periods of cold war, but we've never been able to make up at the end of the bed, so I'm not too worried about that sort of thing."

"So in your head I've progressed to the point of sleeping with you ......"

"Well, I'm going to be a father soon ......"

The Orban Ferencz reserve second class sailor, who was lost in a scarlet fantasy, received a heavy flying kick to the face.

"I've put up with you for a long time!" Hammer showed his teeth and glared at Ferencz.

"Really, even if there's a flight test today, why come to school in flight trousers when it's so hot, it's not like the school doesn't have a locker room ......"

"You've now changed it to fantasizing about taking the opportunity to steal a glimpse under your skirt while I kick you, and then tasting pantyhose with the smell of my body heat and sweat in the locker room while I'm boarding the plane, right?"

"...... When did you learn how to read minds?"

Ferencz's mouth, which had just been kicked askew, was amended back with a left hook.

"Bullshit! Growing up with you in open trousers in a navy family apartment building what else could you hide from me?"

"Ferencz, you actually enjoy being S'd by her, don't you? ......"

"No way!" The two spoke in unison, and Ferencz's friend Naji Sandor Reserve First Class sailor just had to swallow the flashbulb.

"Pity Ferencz ...... Miss Hammer doesn't have you in her heart oh."

"What ...... Cautaurin you say ......"

"She's been staring at Mr. Wittgen the whole study period."

"I think Kautaureen's information about my crush on a boy in the same class is grossly inaccurate and you are responsible for such a big deviation ......"

"Hammer, you're blushing despite being so stern-faced, oh."

"Not at all!!!"

Seeming to notice the hubbub behind him, Air Force Reserve Technical Sergeant Heinrich Wittgen turned his head and glanced behind him before continuing to immerse himself in the questions.

It was half past eleven and most of the students, including Kautaulean, had picked up their bags and gone home for lunch, leaving only about forty members of the National Air Defence Volunteers waiting for their exams.

This organisation was formed at the end of the Second World War, when the Duchy of Syldavia's air force lost all of its professional pilots, who had been trained in peacetime, in the lead-up to the war, and new pilots who were hastily recruited after the outbreak of the war were often sent into battle with less than 20 hours of fighter flying time, most of them not surviving more than half a month on the front line --The death rate of aircrew during the war was an appalling 500% relative to the establishment at the outbreak of the war - Syldavia could not recruit civilian or even general aviation pilots in the same large numbers as the aviation-advanced Atlantic Federation, and the generals in the Defence Ministry Not believing that popularising gliders in high schools so that everyone could pull the joystick would be useful in modern air combat, as was the case in the Eurasian Empire and the Kingdom of Falcum, it was decided that volunteers would be recruited at high school level to train them to fly aircraft, with the higher achievers becoming fighter pilots and the lower achievers being placed on ground duties. In the unsettled post-war years there were almost daily air alerts, and the volunteers helped the busy Air Force and Naval Air Force to identify and disperse them in concert over the decades, while if war did break out they would, by regulation, serve in combat as reservists.

More than forty men lined up on the concrete playground, which was glowing hot from the dazzling early summer sun.

"It's hot. ......" Ferencz complained.

Finally, two black SUVs with the Navy anchor logo painted on the side doors pulled onto the campus.
 
Last edited:
D

Deleted member 2278

Guest
.....on the concrete playground, which was glowing hot from the dazzling early summer sun.
That is hot.

Thanks to @bloody sky for the translation. I've tried to make some allowance for the language barrier and that this probably flows better in the original language but even so......The first chapter is meant to captivate you. Luncheon meat and weird smack talk while kicking(?) are not particularly captivating.....
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Foo Fighter

I came, I saw, I drank some tea (and had a bun).
Senior Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2016
Messages
2,974
Reaction score
1,829
Seems irrelevant still. Also, a clip/sample is not a review.
 

bloody sky

ACCESS: Confidential
Joined
Sep 3, 2021
Messages
86
Reaction score
82
My best friend shared it with me,its name is "Knight,Dragon and WALTZ",I read it.
It is interesting but not finished,that's a pity for its reader.
Here's a map of novel settings.
(Brief place name translation:“瓦拉几亚” means Wallachia,“希尔达维亚” means Syldavia.)
Could you please provide any kind of preview?

Chapter 1: If a high school student can't even fly an orange body, he's already lost (I)

3582 A.H. (1999 A.D.)

Sunday, 5 June

"Grandpa, you can't come back at noon today, you'll have to prepare your own lunch." Corporal Kovacs Hammer Navy Reserve placed a can of luncheon meat on the dining table.

"Don't fool me with this dubious meat crap! If you're too lazy to make beef stew just say so and I won't chastise you, you're only at school for three and a half hours in the morning even if you have compulsory self-study on Sundays, don't think I'm old and confused! Soldiers don't lie!"

"You're really old fashioned, old Commander Kovacs." Hammer thought about it, but didn't say anything, "Well, there's a flight test at noon and afternoon after extra lessons, and you don't want your precious granddaughter to end up with a zero on her first solo flight just to get you back for beef stew."

"You didn't tell me earlier? Soldiers mustn't cover up!" The old man's mildly cataracted eyes instantly glowed with a layer of vapid glory, "Ha! God, I finally know the reason you've kept me alive so long, my granddaughter is going to be a fighter pilot in the Duchy of Syldavia's Naval Air Force!"

"Just a National Air Defence volunteer!" I don't love planes more than my wife and daughter like my old man, and I wouldn't have signed up for flying lessons if it wasn't for you two."

"You and your dad have old man's blood running through you, don't I understand?"

"Come on, come on, don't cry if I fall, goodbye grandpa." Hanmer put on his school bag and opened the door to his room.

"Don't say bad words, son, 30 knots of deck wind bless you!"

"Thirty knots of deck wind" was a blessing that no one but the pilots of the Duchy's naval airlines understood, the equivalent of a "good trip" in common parlance, as a pilot flying off the deck of a carrier into a tailwind could be a fatal The

......

With school bags on their backs, they climbed up the long banzai road, and the school was at the top of this hill.

"Stand up! Salute the Lord God! After saluting, sit."

"Hey, Kautaurene, aren't you awake ......"

"Homework was up until 2:30 >_< Teacher can't you be considerate ......"

Sunday morning is a time of worship for the people of Syldavia, and people up and down the country are at this time immersed in silence and devotion by putting aside their chores - except for secondary school students.

As a country with a large population, it is not easy for high school students in Syldavia to get into a proper university, and although the state mandates a five-day work and study week with two days off, the headmasters of the major private high schools all add an extra day on Saturday in the pursuit of promotion, and the general increase in student performance only further forces the universities to raise their scores, so the headmasters set their sights on Sunday ......

"Ah ...... Teacher I also grade papers until three o'clock ah, anyway bear with me."

The saying "Lawyers in the Atlantic Federation, farmers in the Eurasian Empire, high school students in the Principality of Syldavia - the three most miserable professions in the world" has been around the world for a long time.

......

"Hey Hammer, lend me a hand with yesterday's Mandarin homework."

......

"Ignore me? ...... Hammerhead, sledgehammer ......"

......

"Is that the wrong way for me to open it ...... So, little hammer hammer ......"

"Little you hammer!!!"

"So you can hear me, why are you ignoring me ......"

"Ferencz and Hammer you two are so close ...... I'm so jealous."

"I can't help it, even the best of lovebirds have periods of cold war, but we've never been able to make up at the end of the bed, so I'm not too worried about that sort of thing."

"So in your head I've progressed to the point of sleeping with you ......"

"Well, I'm going to be a father soon ......"

The Orban Ferencz reserve second class sailor, who was lost in a scarlet fantasy, received a heavy flying kick to the face.

"I've put up with you for a long time!" Hammer showed his teeth and glared at Ferencz.

"Really, even if there's a flight test today, why come to school in flight trousers when it's so hot, it's not like the school doesn't have a locker room ......"

"You've now changed it to fantasizing about taking the opportunity to steal a glimpse under your skirt while I kick you, and then tasting pantyhose with the smell of my body heat and sweat in the locker room while I'm boarding the plane, right?"

"...... When did you learn how to read minds?"

Ferencz's mouth, which had just been kicked askew, was amended back with a left hook.

"Bullshit! Growing up with you in open trousers in a navy family apartment building what else could you hide from me?"

"Ferencz, you actually enjoy being S'd by her, don't you? ......"

"No way!" The two spoke in unison, and Ferencz's friend Naji Sandor Reserve First Class sailor just had to swallow the flashbulb.

"Pity Ferencz ...... Miss Hammer doesn't have you in her heart oh."

"What ...... Cautaurin you say ......"

"She's been staring at Mr. Wittgen the whole study period."

"I think Kautaureen's information about my crush on a boy in the same class is grossly inaccurate and you are responsible for such a big deviation ......"

"Hammer, you're blushing despite being so stern-faced, oh."

"Not at all!!!"

Seeming to notice the hubbub behind him, Air Force Reserve Technical Sergeant Heinrich Wittgen turned his head and glanced behind him before continuing to immerse himself in the questions.

It was half past eleven and most of the students, including Kautaulean, had picked up their bags and gone home for lunch, leaving only about forty members of the National Air Defence Volunteers waiting for their exams.

This organisation was formed at the end of the Second World War, when the Duchy of Syldavia's air force lost all of its professional pilots, who had been trained in peacetime, in the lead-up to the war, and new pilots who were hastily recruited after the outbreak of the war were often sent into battle with less than 20 hours of fighter flying time, most of them not surviving more than half a month on the front line --The death rate of aircrew during the war was an appalling 500% relative to the establishment at the outbreak of the war - Syldavia could not recruit civilian or even general aviation pilots in the same large numbers as the aviation-advanced Atlantic Federation, and the generals in the Defence Ministry Not believing that popularising gliders in high schools so that everyone could pull the joystick would be useful in modern air combat, as was the case in the Eurasian Empire and the Kingdom of Falcum, it was decided that volunteers would be recruited at high school level to train them to fly aircraft, with the higher achievers becoming fighter pilots and the lower achievers being placed on ground duties. In the unsettled post-war years there were almost daily air alerts, and the volunteers helped the busy Air Force and Naval Air Force to identify and disperse them in concert over the decades, while if war did break out they would, by regulation, serve in combat as reservists.

More than forty men lined up on the concrete playground, which was glowing hot from the dazzling early summer sun.

"It's hot. ......" Ferencz complained.

Finally, two black SUVs with the Navy anchor logo painted on the side doors pulled onto the campus.
Chapter 7 How can there be only one old man in the Department of Skyfall, and where is the moe girl? (I)

"If we survive this, I'll be sure to ask my superiors for a medal as big as a pie!" Major Falkosh was about to jump up and down in excitement, if his all-broken ulna and radius allowed him to do so.

Lieutenant Nemet and the high school-born volunteer ground crew worked miracles, and that morning all five of the remaining damaged J-5Hs were repaired, except for the two that were largely undamaged and already diverted.

Without the threat of enemy forces, the group was able to not only refuel the five fighters with almost all the aviation fuel remaining in the fuel depot without any hassle.

"You guys aren't coming back anyway, so we'll never have to work again."

"So what are you going to do, become an infantryman, Lieutenant?"

"Live another day. ......"

"I'm sorry to inform you that you and the ground crew still have a tremendous amount of use to squeeze out of you - Orban and Nagy have telegraphed me that the ground crew at the naval base are not trained in how to serve antique fighters like the J-5H, so they will be sending transports to haul you all over there later. "

"Uh ......" cried a laughing face.

......

"They'll come back today, for sure." Heinrich sighed.

With the Major as the center of the circle and the eight pilots in a semi-circle, the scene did seem a lot colder with a third less people at once.

"Anyway, I'll just have to stand on the ground and cheer you on." Joseph stretched his hands.

"So there's only five people ......"

"Naji and Orban will take off together and we'll meet up in the air."

"Expect fewer enemies to come."

"Seven planes against seven hundred, I'll have to ask the state for a mental high pressure allowance after a battle like this."

"Is there that kind of subsidy ......"

"Anyway take off, we'll meet them at high altitude!"

8:12 a.m., June 16, 3582 AH

The five J-5Hs ejected in sequence and the ground crew then turned off the boiler that supplied steam to the catapult, which was not expected to be of much use for some time.

"We've got to climb to 10,000m, if the enemy comes in from high altitude then fight them head on, if friendlies on the ground report the enemy aircraft are approaching at low altitude then charge up and hit the BZ - not the first time we've done it no need for me to bullshit."

"Hey look at those two little orange dots, Nagy and Orban are leaning in."

Yes, we had seven more, we were all in it together, and we had an ace commander who shone like a supernova - even if it was one for one.

......

Georgi Boudescu, however, felt a great loneliness at this time, even though he was still in the midst of a huge fleet of 700 aircraft.

When he returned yesterday to report the death of his long plane in battle, he got little response, all of them busy.

Downed aircraft and crews in the establishment were supplemented by others who had caught up to the battle, wounded pilots were carried out of damaged bombers, and on one B-45 only the pilot survived - returning with three bodies. Damaged fighters that could not be visually repaired within a day were all tossed aside and replaced by unsealed spares.

Stinking of blood, nitrate and aviation paraffin, the TLAF, like a large, emotionless organism, was mechanically performing its own healing and repair procedures in preparation for the next day's sortie.

At the moment they are running towards Sulina.

......

"Comrade Head Goose, friendly early warning aircraft have spotted enemy aircraft!"

"Specific."

"Seven, heading 12 o'clock, heading due east, altitude 9,000 metres, speed Mach 0.7!"

"Heading right for us, those tough orange bastards from yesterday, I think."

"Enemy aircraft turning south, still climbing!"

"Enemy aircraft heading west, continuing to climb!"

"...... just tell me the enemy planes are circling and rising." That's what he thought but didn't say.

"How far are you from the enemy aircraft now?"

"53 kilometres!"

"They must have set up the ring, so we'll have to play along! --Air Combat Team drop sub tanks and go forward to pester them!"

Visibility under clear skies was so good that even the naked eye could easily spot the approaching swarm.

"Enemy swarm sighted!"

"Ho, there's so many again!"

"They're climbing!"

"Guess we're going to take the altitude advantage?"

"Not exactly. ...... Probably half of them are climbing and the other half are maintaining altitude."

Even if it's half that's still a hundred Peregrines ...... Hammer thought to himself.

Head to head, just as yesterday the J-5Hs of the general volunteer group barreled straight at each other.

"Still want to meet head on?"

"No ......," Heinrich pursed his lips, "see down there? The ones that lay eggs are the more important targets."

The Peyser pilots were surprised to find the Syldavians doing a nice half-roll inversion to the right right right in front of their own eyes and then diving down nearly vertically - only a few reacted fast enough to follow, most of the other F-86s were thrown off by the J-5Hs accelerating sharply under maximum military thrust.

"What the f**k are all doing with the flying pebbles!" Radio communications from the bomber group went haywire as they watched the rapidly approaching orange killers.

Without orders, the searing projectiles from the aerial guns raced through the air towards the bombers who had no time to react.

It was the same dive attack as yesterday, this time with a Canberra under Hammer's gun - just a short point-blank shot of less than a second, and the shell slammed unceremoniously into the BAE bomber's wide main wing, detonating the fuel tanks inside the wing.

"Ha ha! Another one!"

"That s**t-breeder just shattered!"

"Don't get distracted! Keep going down!"

The J-5Hs swooped right through the group of bombers and headed for the fighter-bombers below, who were in disarray at the sight of the bombers above them being slaughtered, some sticking to a tight formation, more scattering for cover, and some even tilting their heads up as if ready to fight to the death.

At this point, the pursuing air fighters were detoured for fear of colliding with the panicked bombers, and the volunteer pilots were left with no worries.

"Let's eat meat!"

Hammer's target this time was an F2H Banshee, but he was too fast for the enemy aircraft and not a big target, and the shells shot out with little reaction other than what seemed to be a crumbling of aluminium.

"Ugh, pity."

With the huge threat, a number of fighter-bombers had dropped their bombs before reaching the target and managed to manoeuvre to evade.

"All right, pull up!"

The J-5H group changed out of their dive and climbed west at a shallow angle at a high speed of nearly Mach 1, leaving the enemy aircraft behind.

Hammer looked around and it was a joy to see that none of the six J-5Hs around him had fallen out of formation and were still holding a tight formation.

......
 
Last edited:

bloody sky

ACCESS: Confidential
Joined
Sep 3, 2021
Messages
86
Reaction score
82

bloody sky,​

sorry, you misunderstood me. What I asked for was a preview - a short introduction to the world & plot, not a samples of chapters.

Country and politics: Principality of Syldavia 1997

1654687810290.png

Country name: Principality of Syldavia

Land area: 8,671,500 square kilometres

Population: 48,772,000

National anthem: "Hymn" (also known as "God Bless Syldavia" after its first verse)

Political system: constitutional monarchy (Prussian constitutionalism)

Ideology: social liberalism

Capital: Budapest

Head of State: Gusgrin III

1654687836800.png

The Duchy of Syldavia is located in the eastern part of the Old World, with more than half of its territory covered by plains, the south-western part by mountains, the remnants of the high Alps, the northern part by deserts, the Carpathians as the central ridge of the country's terrain running north-west to south-east, and the Danube delta in the east by swamps.

The country borders the Eurasian Empire to the north, the Grand Duchy of Vassar to the northwest, the Republic of Bohemia to the west, the Federation of Slavonia to the southwest and the Principality of Wallachia to the south, making it the longest country in the world.

Southern Slavonia is an enclave of the Principality in the northern Adriatic Sea, far from the mainland, bordered by the Kingdom of Falcum and the Federation of Slavarea respectively.

The eastern part of the country is bordered by the western Pacific Ocean and to the south-east of the country is its largest island, the Admiralty Islands.

Lake Balaton, located in the south of Syldavia, is the largest lake in the Old World.

Most of the territory of Syldavia has a temperate monsoon climate, partly continental and sub-boreal coniferous climate.

The Danube, the longest river in the Old World, flows through Syldavia, with most of its length forming the border between Syldavia and Wallachia, and its lower reaches entering the sea within Syldavia.

The main ethnic group in Syldavia are the Magyar, who make up 56% of the population, followed by the Dacians with 22%, the Slavs with 12%, the Germans with 6% and other minorities with the remaining 4%.

According to legend, the history of Syldavia begins in 1583 BC, but the lack of archaeological evidence suggests that it was established in the 10th century AD by nomadic peoples who moved in and joined forces with the indigenous peoples to establish a regime that continues to this day. In 2284 A.H. (1001 A.D.), the Magyar chieftain Arpad Istvan converted to Catholicism, was crowned Istvan I and established a feudal state. From the 14th century onwards, pagans from the Middle Continent began to raid the eastern part of the Old World. As the pagans gained a foothold on the Wallachian coast, the raids became full-scale invasions, and in the 16th century Syldavia, which had been an outpost of the Catholic world against the pagans, was betrayed by the Papacy, but the crusaders crusading against the pagans marched east and west with them, and all of Syldavia was taken and the country essentially died. But the last descendants of the Syldavian kings continued the guerrilla war until March 15th, 3131 AH (1848), when the long-suppressed Magyar people broke out into a full-scale uprising, destroying the Falkom garrison in a street battle in Budapest on the first day of the revolt and capturing their governor and many of his retainers, which the modern principality of Syldavia calls Liberation Day.

Before the pagans had fully withdrawn, the Eurasian Empire and the Kingdom of Falcum invaded Syldavia with more than three million troops from the north and west, seeking to carve up the new country in the name of crushing the pagans. But the 300,000-strong Syldavian volunteer army did not compromise, and after three years of difficult warfare, the country miraculously overcame all three enemy armies, expelled them from the land, re-established itself as a modern feudal kingdom, and began to expand its power to the north, south and east. In the process, conflict erupted between Syldavia and the newly independent prehistoric enemy of Wallachia.

In 3177, during the War of the Saronic Succession, Syldavia fought for its proxy against the newly modernised Principality of Keol. Four cruisers were sunk, one ironclad was captured, another ironclad and three cruisers were too badly damaged to return home and were sunk by the naval officers themselves to avoid capture, almost all of the navy's main ships were lost, and the loss of naval power led to the destruction of the Syldavian army in the Salani. The defeat sent shockwaves through the country and Budapest became a city of long lights for a week, with the grieving public mourning for the brave men and women, but also pointing the finger at the backward feudal system that had led the country to become a constitutional monarchy, following the example of the Kingdom of Falcum, which had undergone radical capitalist reforms.

Ten years later, Syldavia finally had the opportunity to experiment with the sword that had been sharpened for ten years. In 3187 AH, a massive war broke out between Syldavia and the powerful and decaying Eurasian Empire, with the Syldavian army fighting on land and sea, capturing a large part of the Pacific Northwest coast, known as the "North-East Corridor".

In 3197 AH, the First World War broke out and Syldavia, along with Falcum, was part of the Allies, fighting against the Allied powers of Eurasia, Slavarea and Wallachia. A costly victory in which the Syldavian navy wiped out the Allied Western Pacific Combined Fleet announced the long-established horseback nation as the newest power on the blue water. Unlike Falcum, who had taken advantage of the situation on all fronts, Syldavia had to fight hard on all fronts against a numerically superior enemy, but barely managed to keep its territory intact.

In 3220 AH, the peace that had been hoped for was easily shattered when the Second World War broke out, with Falkom, Slavarea and Wallachia uniting as the Axis Powers to quickly destroy Vassar and Bohemia, followed by an all-out assault on Syldavia and Eurasia, with the Duchy of Keogh joining the Axis in an attempt to once again shake Syldavia's hold on the Western Pacific. --But the Axis had hit a brick wall as Eurasia and Syldavia annihilated the invading enemy forces in an epic battle, and with Eurasia's support, the predominantly foot and cavalry Syldavian army was rapidly transformed into a huge mechanised iron stream. As the Atlantic coastal states merged to form the Atlantic Confederation, the Axis camp quickly collapsed under the weight of the three powers, and the Syldavian Army stormed Belgrade, the capital of Slavaria, in 3228 AH, while driving straight into Wallachian territory, the major Axis powers quickly succumbed, and Syldavia made huge gains in World War II - -to take the Transylvanian region, which had been constantly contested with Wallachia for millennia, completely out of its hands.

But there was no peace and stability in the new world order, relations with Eurasia quickly turned cold and the Greek state's long-standing thirst for sea power in the Pacific turned the Atlantic Federation into a mortal enemy. Rather than being sanctioned, the defeated states quickly re-emerged on the back of the two camps, led by the Atlantic Federation and the Eurasian Empire, in what the Syldavians call a "tarnished and despicable peace" - a country that faced isolation and hostility from its five land-based neighbours and the international community as a whole. This insecurity was compounded by the isolation and hostility of its five surrounding land-based neighbours and the international community as a whole, as well as by a violent and growing revolt within the hot potato of internal Transylvania, which had turned to foreign support, and by the fact that Syldavia was forced to maintain a large army on the scale of a world war, as well as being involved in successive wars in Salani, Granada and Peshturanka to stop the expansion of the forces of the Two Oceans Alliance. From the 1960s onwards, Syldavia was forced to reduce its army, lower taxes and reform its economy, and after 20 years of struggle to return to economic power. But the outbreak of the Salani War of Unification in 3278 and the fall of the Socialist Republic of Northern Salani marked the end of Syldavia's power abroad, and with the succession of the new, hawkish Gusgrim III, Syldavia began to respond more aggressively to the Cold War, which was to push the whole world into war once more.

1654687859918.png
 
Last edited:

bloody sky

ACCESS: Confidential
Joined
Sep 3, 2021
Messages
86
Reaction score
82

bloody sky,​

sorry, you misunderstood me. What I asked for was a preview - a short introduction to the world & plot, not a samples of chapters.

Aviation technology: Syldavia military aircraft 1949-2014

MiG-15 (J-2) - the first Syldavian jet fighter to be assembled from imported spare parts, it came off the production line and served as the mainstay of the Syldavian Air Force in the Salani War.

MiG-15Bis (J-4) - also imported in bulk, an improved version of the MiG-15 with a change of engine from the RD-45F to the more powerful VK-1 thrust, as well as changes to the reduction plates and other aspects.

MiG-15UTI (JJ-2) - a two-seat trainer version of the MiG-15, with the 37mm and 23mm guns removed and only one 23mm gun each retained. Unlike other countries using MiG-15s, most of Syldavia's MiG-15UTIs were not purpose-built but were converted from single-seat MiG-15s that had been retired from front-line service.

MiG-15UTH (JJ-4) - A naval combat trainer designed by the Syldavian Naval Air Force to complement the J-5H on carriers, the used MiG-15Bis were also navalised similarly to the J-5H in addition to being converted to two-seaters.

J-5 - a licensed MiG-17F with a new wing with an increased swept-back angle of 45 degrees from the MiG-15 series, and a new engine with an afterburner and a boosted VK-1F (domestic designation WP-5 engine).

J-5H - The first jet fighter of the Syldavian Navy, the J-5 was based on a larger folding wing with additional leading edge slits, two-stage flaps, increased angle of depression, stronger landing gear and fuselage, and additional landing hooks. Speed has been reduced compared to the J-5, but horizontal hovering performance has been slightly improved due to the reduced wing loading.

J-5A - a licensed MiG17PF all-weather fighter, with the addition of the RP-1 airborne radar in the nose and a mix of one 37mm and two 23mm guns as standard on the MiG15/17 series, instead of three 23mm guns.

J-6A - the authorised MiG19PF all-weather fighter, Hilldavia's first supersonic fighter, although the first batch assembled from imported spare parts was equipped as early as 3541 (equivalent to 1958 AD), was produced in-house and due to quality problems, production was very low until more than a decade later Its improved version, the J-6AG, was mass-produced.

J-6B - a licensed MiG19PM all-weather interceptor, with all guns removed compared to the J-6A and armed only with four PL-1 air-to-air missiles guided by RP-2U airborne radar, but only a few were built due to the extremely low accuracy and reliability of the PL-1 air-to-air missiles.

J-6C - the authorised MiG19S day fighter, armed with three 30mm guns, was for a long time the mainstay of the Syldavian Air Force fighter force.

J-6III - An upward revision of the J-6C, the engine was changed from the WP-6 to the improved WP-6A, the intake was given an adjustable surge cone, the thickness of the intake lip was reduced, the wings were modified, and a pair of additional hangers were added to the wingtips to carry PL-2 infra-red air-to-air missiles (the J-6C was also later modified to The speed of the J-6III was increased compared to the J-6C, but pilots complained that the pitch direction was too sensitive due to the centre of gravity (the name of the aircraft was changed to J-6D after the navy and air force abolished the Latin alphabet).

J-6AG - an improved version of the J-6A - replaced the original RP-1 radar with a more advanced SL-2 radar, the engine was also changed to WP-6A, and the two 23mm guns of the J-6A were replaced with two 30mm guns, which also had the ability to fire PL-2s, although the performance on first flight was relatively poor compared to the international Although the performance of the J-6A was already outdated compared to the F-4 series and MiG23 series of all-weather fighters at the time of its first flight, it was still procured in large numbers as the only available all-weather fighter for a short period of time.

J-6IV - an upwardly mobile version of the J-6AG with similar air intakes and wing modifications as the J-6III - was not very popular with the Air Force and was procured in only one-fifth the number of J-6AGs (the aircraft was later renamed the J-6E).

JZ-6 - a tactical reconnaissance aircraft based on the J-6C, with the removal of an aerial gun and the addition of a reconnaissance equipment bay protruding from the fuselage.

JJ-6 - A two-seat trainer based on the J-6C, retaining only one aerial gun.

J-6H - a naval fighter variant of the J-6, the development of which was delayed by nearly 20 years due to the magnitude of the improvements. In addition to the usual shipboard modifications such as the strengthening of the landing gear and the elimination of the deceleration chute and the addition of a landing hook, the J-6H has a completely redesigned 47 degree swept-back wing with leading edge stitching to replace the thick 55 degree swept-back wing used by the original J-6s, which is distinctly different in appearance from the other J-6s.

J-7 - Imported as a loose assembly, the MiG21F-13 with its sharp delta wings was the first fighter of the Syldavian Air Force to reach twice the speed of sound, first flying in 1967, and a few more were produced domestically since then, but the numbers added up to very few.

J-7I - a localised version of the J-7 based on mapping, with one gun instead of two and a thicker inlet lip to enhance subsonic manoeuvrability - flew far better than the J-6 series in speed and altitude, although the J-7 and J-7I were badly received by pilots, mainly due to the inherited prototype's belt-and-release ejection system. The J-7 and J-7I had more than a dozen failed ejections during their service in Syldavia, all of which resulted in the death of their pilots, and after the J-7II's service all the remaining early J-7s were transferred to the Northern Saracen Air Force, where they were largely destroyed in the civil war.

J-7II - The J-7 unit was demoralised and even refused to take to the air due to the huge problems with the belt release ejection system, the first change to the J-7II was to equip it with the HTY-2 rocket ejection seat, for which the cockpit cover was changed to a two-part system with the front windscreen fixed and the cockpit cover rotating upwards to open. The J-7II was renamed the J-7B after the change to the WP-7B engine, which had more thrust, and the parachute bay was moved from the belly to the root of the tail.

J-7IIH - In the early 1980's Syldavia introduced the Viper-3 infra-red guided air missile from Iglesia and authorised its production as the PL-8. 7BH.

J-7IIHH - A naval version of the J-7IIH, part of the aluminium-magnesium alloy components were changed to aluminium alloy to protect against the heat, salt spray and mould of the maritime environment, the aircraft was later renamed J-7H.

J-7C - The biggest problem with the J-7 series after it entered service was the lack of detection capability due to the simple radar range finder, which was comparable to visual sighting of enemy aircraft even in daylight, and the Greek Air Force had to defend the night skies of the motherland with the J-6AG, which was 30 years behind the times, and in this requirement the new J-7C was effectively the same as the Sylvia The new J-7C, which had nothing to do with the previous J-7 series built by Hilldavia, was a mapping of the MiG-21MFs supplied by Parthia that had been captured during the war with Hijaz, and had a significantly thicker front fuselage than the J-7II, with an additional JL-7 fire control radar in the intake cone, and the ability to guide PL-4 air-to-air missiles for over-the-horizon combat. The spine was thickened and fuel tanks were added, and the power was replaced by a more powerful WP-13 engine, which was copied with the aircraft.

J-7D - the J-7C, despite its excellent performance on paper, was not up to the task, with the WP-13 engine failing constantly and only becoming combat-capable after four years of service. The avionics and fire control systems have been upgraded and the weapons system has been replaced with a new twin-barrelled aerial gun based on the Gsh-23 and can fire PL-7 and PL-8 air-to-air missiles. Despite the improvements, the biggest problem with the J-7C/D was that the change in shape and increased weight led to a reduction in manoeuvrability and range, which was not popular with pilots, and production of both types totalled less than 50 aircraft.

J-7E - J-7C/D was a disappointment to the Air Force and the next step in the J-7 series was to return to the J-7II base, with the biggest improvements being a new design of twin delta wings with a larger area, a reduction in the trailing edge angle of the outer section to 47 degrees, the introduction of leading edge manoeuvring flaps for the first time on a Greek fighter, and a change in fuselage material to aluminium-lithium. The J-7E was powered by the same WP-13F, which gave the J-7E a surprising increase in manoeuvrability, and a new fire control system that had been tested on the J-7D, with the addition of a HUD. The fuel tanks in this position were removed, and the cockpit ballistic steel was removed to reduce weight.

J-7EH - After the J-7E entered service with the Air Force to great acclaim, Hildavan pilots who loved combat air combat finally had a new aircraft with horizontal hovering performance that surpassed that of the J-6 series, and in response the Navy was not to be outdone and adapted the J-7E to the sea in a similar manner to the J-7IIHH.

J-7G - Despite the entry into service of the J-8B and J-9 series, these high-speed interceptors did not change the dilemma of the Syldavian Air Force and Marine Air Corps front-line fighter units still lacking an over-the-horizon air combat capability, so the radar range finder in the J-7E's intake cone was removed in favour of a small pulse Doppler radar. The J-7E's radar range finder was replaced with a small pulse doppler radar, the J-7E was fitted with a rounded windscreen, and a helmet-mounted sight was added to allow the PL-8's large off-axis launch capability to be fully utilised, and its combat air combat capability was improved.

JJ-7 - After the J-7II had solved its chronic problems the J-7 series began mass production to replace the J-6 series, but the aerodynamic layout and handling characteristics of the delta wing made the J-7 series quite different from the swept-back JJ-2 and JJ-6 advanced trainers, making pilot training much more difficult and dangerous. The MiG-21MF was mapped together with the MiG-21US two-seat trainer and combined with the J-7II to produce the JJ-7. However, what was inherited from the prototype was that this trainer was difficult to operate at low altitude and low speed, and its take-off and landing speed was even higher than that of the J-7, and the poor view of the rear seat instructor's cabin could only be compensated by a periscope. Welcome.

JJ-7A - with the J-8 and J-9 series of interceptors entering service, the Air Force's need for a Mach 2 advanced trainer increased, but the JJ-7, with its electromechanical flight instruments, was becoming increasingly difficult to meet the demands of the newer fighters with glass cockpits, so the JJ-7A was upgraded with avionics, a HUD and a The JJ-7 and JJ-7A were both unarmed, but the centreline mount point could be fitted with a 23mm twin-barrel gun pod.

J-8 -
Syldavia's first indigenously developed jet fighter, based on the J-7 series airframe enlarged to include two WP-7A engines, was first flown in 1969 due to good organisation, but encountered a number of technical obstacles after its first flight, with the intended equipment of an on-board fire control radar, a PL-4 semi-active radar guidance system, and a PL-4 semi-active radar. The PL-4 semi-active radar-guided air-to-air missile was cancelled, and the 30-2 turbo cannon was replaced with the same two 30-1 guns as the J-7I, which only entered service in 1974.

J-8A - as the basic J-8 fell far short of its design objectives, improvements were made to the J-8A, which was finally equipped with the JL-7A radar and PL-4 air-to-air missiles based on the J-7C's development process, giving it some over-the-horizon capability. In addition, the gun was replaced with a 23-III twin-barrel gun and the cockpit was designed to open up to the rear with a rocket ejection seat in accordance with the J-7II design, and the previously produced J-8s were converted to J-8As.

J-8E - As times changed, the J-8A fleet of the Syldavian Air Force became the antithesis of "equipment-as-obsolete", but the fleet of over 200 J-8As could not be easily abandoned, so in the 1990s the J-8As were given improved avionics and a HUD. The J-8A's avionics were improved in the 1990s, and a HUD was added, making them the J-8E, by which time the nose-inlet J-8 had long been discontinued and all J-8Es were converted from the J-8A.

JZ-8 - previously equipped by the Hilldavia Air Force reconnaissance unit - was still based on the JZ-6 designed in the 1950s, the J-8A's top speed of Mach 2.2 and its roomier airframe than the J-7 series offered the possibility of adding a reconnaissance equipment bay.

JZ-8E - After the outbreak of war the J-8E proved to be extremely anemic in air combat and as a disposal of the chicken feed, the Greek Air Force quickly converted the nearly 100 surviving J-8Es into tactical reconnaissance aircraft in accordance with the JZ-8 to cope with the increasing demand for reconnaissance missions during the war, except for the increased drag of the equipment bay which slightly affected the maximum speed, the JZ-8E retained the air combat capabilities of the J-8E.

J-8B - The J-8A largely met the targets set twenty years earlier, but excessive delays only forced the Greek state to continue to catch up with the other powers in its interceptor fleet, and measures were taken to convert the J-8 series to a new generation of interceptors with air intakes on both sides and a large-diameter SL-5 (later changed to the more powerful SL-8) radar in the nose The J-8 series was also powered by the WP-13A.

J-8C - As neighbouring air forces began to equip themselves with third generation fighters, the pressure on the Greek air force for air defence increased again, and as soon as the J-8B entered service a huge programme of improvements was proposed, including a new WP-14 engine, JL-9 radar and a new avionics system, but two of the J-8Cs However, two prototypes of the J-8C crashed one after another, causing serious delays in the schedule. Given the faster progress of the J-9 series, the J-8C was finally dismantled in order to ensure the development and production of the J-13H, J-8F and J-11A.

J-8D - a product of the J-8B upgraded avionics, the biggest change in appearance was the addition of a receiving probe rod with aerial refuelling capability, the J-8D was mostly upgraded from the J-8B except for new builds, although numbered later but in service well before the J-8C, the J-8B/D was popular with the nation for its slender and elegant appearance. The J-8B/D was popular with the nation for its slender and elegant appearance, and with its successor the J-8II series as distinguished from the nose inlet J-8.

J-8F - a significantly upgraded version of the J-8B/D, with a new WP-13B engine and JL-10 fire control radar, and a fully upgraded avionics system, and the ability to carry the YJ-8 series of anti-ship missiles and YJ-91 anti-radiation missiles - changed from a mere interceptor to a multi-purpose aircraft that could perform sea and air defence suppression missions. The JZ-8F is a multi-purpose fighter that can perform sea and air defence suppression missions.

JZ-8F - A tactical reconnaissance aircraft based on the J-8F, retaining its air combat capability while adding multiple reconnaissance capabilities, such as optical, infrared and electronic.

J-8G - after the J-8 was finally fitted with the J-8C's planned WP-14 engine, which increased its maximum speed to Mach 2.5 and gave it the ability to carry and launch PL-12 active radar-guided air-to-air missiles (an upgrade that has since been made to the J-8F), the J-8G is mainly used in the J-11 series after mass production J-8G is mainly used for air defence suppression missions.

J-8T - the final version of the J-8II series, with reduced wing thickness and increased high speed capability for intercepting targets above Mach 3 and modular mission pods, but the J-8 was born 40 years ago with little potential left to squeeze out and few J-8Ts were produced.

J-12 - an ultra-light "National Fighter" designed for the Greek National Air Defence Volunteers in the 1960s to cope with the lack of air power in the event of a world war - weighed only 4.1 tonnes and could fly with a WP-6B engine from the J-6. The J-12 was also amazingly adaptable to landing and taking off on flat ground only six hundred metres long, but it was the small size of the J-12, its low fuel capacity and lack of upgrade potential that stopped it at the prototype stage.

J-13A - although the J-8 first flew in the late 1960s, the Greek Air Force saw it, like the J-7 series, as a complement to the J-7 in terms of high altitude and speed, and the tone of air combat was still one of exhilarating low and medium altitude dogfights, for which a new light combat fighter was needed to replace the already slightly tired J-6, but The Air Force's interest in the J-13 waned into the 1980s and it was eventually abandoned in favour of Project 10, although the factory still hoped that the programme would have export prospects and a prototype was built and first flew in 1988, but earlier that year the J-7E, with its much higher fighting performance, was launched. The J-13A was left untouched by the introduction of the vastly superior J-7E earlier that same year.

J-13H - while the Air Force chose the J-7E and abandoned the J-13A, the Naval Air Force was eager to replace the long out-of-date J-6H naval fighter, and at first sight saw the J-13's upper monoplane layout as suitable for carrier-based bombing operations, and the Navy abandoned the Air Force's favoured belly-in configuration for a stubby landing gear for the naval aircraft. The prototype first flew in 1993 and was put into production in the same year to replace the J-6H before all test flights were completed. The J-13B - the J-6H - was put into production as a replacement for the J-6H.

J-13B - a two-seat version of the J-13H - was mainly used for training between the Q-5S trainer and the J-13H, but was also used by Naval Air Forces's test units to expand the J-13's ground and sea attack capability, although overall production was low.

J-13C - a modernised version of the J-13H - uses a telemetry flight control system, a "one flat, three down" glass cockpit, upgraded avionics, an increased proportion of composite materials in the fuselage, and a power replacement based on the WP-15B modified for the carrier aircraft. The WP-15H is based on the WP-15B, with enhanced reliability and low-speed performance, and is later compatible with PL-12 air-to-air missiles.

J-13L - As almost all new J-7MF and J-10 aircraft were snapped up by the attritional Air Force, the J-13C land-based version was designed specifically for the Marine Air Corps to replace some of the older J-6 and J-7 series in its hands, eliminating the folding wing and landing hook design and replacing the landing gear with the simpler version used in the J-13A. The landing gear was also changed to the simpler version used in the J-13A, which was lighter and less costly than the naval version.

J-13D - a modernised version of the J-13B, and arguably a two-seater version of the J-13C, with essentially the same changes, except that the J-13D's main feature was a significantly enhanced information processing capability using upgraded computer systems, replacing the Q-5S for the FAAC mission.

J-13G - The J-13D was a modified anti-radiation fighter with better self-defence air combat capability than the Q-6G, but the Navy preferred the Q-6G's high speed and longer range, and only a small number of J-13Gs were produced and delivered to the Marine Air Corps without the folding wings and landing hook.

J-13E - a variant of the J-13C with the WS-16 engine, the rear fuselage was redesigned to be longer and thicker, and the radar and avionics were upgraded, the new turbofan engine had lower fuel consumption and better low-speed performance than the turbojet, but the successive engine failures after equipping the force caused a staggering number of accidents, especially for The J-13CM was a light naval fighter, and the reliability of the engine was more important to the Air Force than to the Navy, so the number of aircraft equipped with this type has been small and in a state of repair.

J-13CM - the power system of the J-13E turned out to be the biggest chronic problem, and to avoid dragging down other subsystems, the radar and avionics improvements of the J-13E were applied to the J-13C. The J-13CM was mainly used to replace the attrition of the J-13C fleet, and production was not very large, while the remaining J-13Cs were also upgraded to the J-13CM standard. The remaining J-13Cs were also upgraded to the J-13CM standard.

J-13F - a variant of the J-13E again with the WS-10 engine - performed significantly better than the WS-16 after addressing various shortcomings, but the J-13 series was, after all, a concept developed more than forty years ago, with too little range and insufficient scope for upgrade in modern air warfare, especially for naval fighters requiring greater independent search capability. The J-13F was replaced by the huge and new J-15 heavy carrier fighter before it could be mass produced to replace all the J-13Cs, and only deployed on older carriers where space was too tight to deploy the J-15.

J-13J - a two-seat version of the J-13F that took over from the J-13D for the FAC-seat mission - became the swansong of the J-13 series.

J-9A - a single-engine, two-sided air intake solution developed in parallel with the twin-engine nose intake solution (later developed into the J-8) during the development of the interceptor in the 1960s - was changed repeatedly and finally settled on a duck-wing plus tailless delta-wing layout. The J-9 prototype first flew in 1992 and was entered into service as the J-9A, but despite serious delays, this interceptor, which could fly at Mach 2.3 and had some close combat capability, was the pride of Syldavia's aviation industry.

J-9S - a two-seater version - was one of the first to experience the war in Wallachia, along with many other Syldavian fighters, and revealed that the lack of a datalink system and the radio band being blocked by hundreds of calls from fighters made it difficult to obtain navigation and air combat guidance information in the first place. The J-9S added a navigator's cockpit to the J-9A to facilitate the processing of information to other J-9As in the same formation. In order to reduce the need for aerodynamic modifications and to get the aircraft into production as quickly as possible, the J-9S had an extremely small navigator's cockpit and was not fitted with a piloting system, so it could not be used as a combat trainer.

J-9C - a modernised version of the J-9A, the J-9A entered the war with a number of problems that were revealed to be corrected, the main changes being the replacement of power with the more reliable WP-15B engine with more thrust, the upgrading of the data link system and fire control computer, the increased use of composite materials to reduce weight and the addition of a new cockpit in front of the J-9A. IRST (Infra-Red Search and Tracking System), which was inherited from the J-11 series of fighters, was added to the front of the cockpit, wave-absorbing materials were installed in the inlet channels and duck wings, and it became the first Syldavia to be compatible with PL-12 active radar-guided air-to-air missiles.

J-9D - a two-seat version of the J-9C with enhanced and information and data sharing capabilities - continues to serve as the brains of the interceptor fleet. Unlike the J-9S, the J-9D has an additional manoeuvring side lever on the left side of the navigator's compartment, which together with the camera under the nose allows for easy manoeuvrability in the event of pilot incapacitation.

J-9G - Based on the J-9D, the J-9D was modified to serve as the J-8F/G fleet leader due to the low survivability of the JH-7G, which had been performing anti-aircraft suppression duties, and the difficulty of handling complex battlefield intelligence with the J-8F/G's single-seat design.

J-9E - a further improvement to the J-9C - incorporates significant technology from the RJ-9CM strategic interceptor, including active phased array radar and forward-looking infra-red systems, as well as modernised avionics, and the need for a two-seat version was removed as there was sufficient data analysis and sharing capability. The power system was also replaced with the WP-15C, which offers better fuel economy and reliability, but the J-9 series, which was still based on the idea of a high-altitude, high-speed interceptor, was coming to an end as the J-10 and J-11 series continued to mature.

J-9B - competing with the J-9-6III (which later evolved into the J-9A) - was the J-9-6II, a twin-engine, twin-tailed heavy interceptor with the same overall design of duck wings plus a tailless delta wing, and the Air Force had difficulty choosing between the two options and decided to develop prototypes of both. The J-9B prototype first flew in 1995, exceeding the J-9A's initial design specification of Mach 2.5, but by this time the Air Force had decided to go with the more economical J-9A, and the J-9B stopped at the prototype stage.

R-9A - the J-8 series derived from a variety of reconnaissance aircraft - was limited in performance and could only meet the needs of tactical reconnaissance, while the war made it urgent for Syldavia to catch up with the SR-71 and MiG-25R, high-speed strategic reconnaissance aircraft that could drive deep into other countries. The R-9A was converted from the J-9B, but with the two-seat design of the J-9S. The focus of the conversion was on removing all facilities that could be removed to reduce weight, and since the R-9A was designed entirely for high speed self-defence, all radar, ordnance and avionics systems associated with air combat were removed (thus giving it a new type of designation, R, instead of the traditional JZ designation for combat reconnaissance aircraft). The R-9A had a slightly longer nose, the leading edge manoeuvring flaps were removed, the duck wings were reduced in size and made stationary, the tail height was shortened to reduce drag, parts were made of lighter titanium where possible and even holes were drilled in some parts to reduce weight, and the R-9A eventually achieved its intended performance of a top speed of Mach 2.8 and a lift of 28,000 metres.

R-9B - to meet the needs of the Mach 3 strategic reconnaissance aircraft - was pressed to exploit all the potential of the WP-15 engine, with changes to increase the pressure ratio, raise the temperature in front of the turbine and use fuel to cool the engine directly, the improved engine was characterised as the WP-15R, i.e. modified for strategic reconnaissance aircraft The R-9A was replaced with the WP-15R engine and called the R-9B. Although the top speed was only increased to Mach 2.9 a step away from Mach 3, the new engine worked for much longer at terminal speed, improving overall performance, and after successful trials all R-9As were upgraded to the R-9B.

R-9C - the R-9A/B was only a stage in the strategic reconnaissance aircraft programme, far from the final needs of Syldavia, who were also only testing new engines for the R-9C, the next improvement being a redesign of the air intakes with enlarged openings and adjustable surge cones, elaborate internal fairings in the air intakes and surge The most significant changes were the lengthening of the fuselage to increase the fuel storage capacity and the addition of a pair of 700 litre water tanks on each side of the back and above the intake. of top secret information.

RJ-9C - For the past thirty years, the Atlantic Federation's B-70 strategic bomber with its impressive speed of Mach 3 was considered the greatest air defence threat to Syldavia, and all of the Greek Air Force's interceptors were unable to intercept it effectively until the R-9C came along and gave the Air Force hope and decided to convert it into a high-speed strategic interceptor - all reconnaissance equipment was removed, a large fire control radar was re-installed in the nose cone and the pilot/reconnaissance system operator's cabin was replaced with a weapons officer's cabin. Due to a lack of suitable long-range air-to-air missiles, the Greek Air Force converted the HQ-16 surface-to-air missile to an active radar-guided head and renamed it the PL-16 long-range air-to-air missile, with three in parallel on a semi-buried mount in the belly of the RJ-9C as the main armament, which reduced the top speed of the RJ-9C to Mach 3.1 due to increased weight and drag, but still gave the interceptor force that had rejected the J-9B the ability to compete with the F-12 and MiG31. -The RJ-9C did indeed live up to its reputation, saving Syldavia from disaster on several occasions.

RJ-9CM - a modernised and improved version of the RJ-9C - has an advanced active phased array radar for fire control and an avionics system upgraded to match the new radar and the improved PL-16 air-to-air missile, and a more powerful IRST (Infra-Red Search and Tracking System) than its J-11 counterpart. The new air-to-air combat system was so effective that all RJ-9Cs were upgraded to the RJ-9CM standard, as a result of the addition of a more powerful IRST (Infra-Red Search and Tracking System), which could target supersonic targets at speeds of up to 500km even when the radar was jammed.

J-7MF - an improved version of the J-7G, the fourth generation light fighter (MF means "modern fighter"), with a completely redesigned front fuselage, a belly air intake, a more powerful fire control radar in the nose cone, and a pair of small fixed duck wings on either side of the cockpit to produce a more efficient fighter. A pair of small fixed duck wings were added to generate vortices for enhanced manoeuvrability and the powertrain was upgraded to WP-14 engines, but the J-7MF's priority was rapidly reduced to a reluctant export project due to the need to secure the J-10, but serious engine problems with the J-10 and J-11 gave the aircraft the opportunity to go off the drawing board and the prototype first flew in late 1999. The prototype flew its first test flight in just 50 days and then began full-scale production to supplement and replace the heavily depleted fleet of J-7s.

J-7T - during test flights, test pilots had already suggested that the small fixed duck wing on the nose could be fully replaced with the J-10's larger full-motion duck wing design, and after the J-7MF was delivered to the force in volume to meet the immediate needs, designers were finally able to focus on refining the design, putting more J-10 design elements on the J-7MF. The J-7T was delivered in late 2000 as a transitional fighter, the "T" being the initials for "Ten", signifying its close relationship with the J-10, and with the J-10P, which was barely resolved as a compromise in 2002, the J-10P was delivered. The J-7T's mission as a transitional fighter came to an end when the J-10P, which had barely solved its engine problems, entered mass production in 2002, and production was quickly cut back to make way for the production line.

J-10A - named Project 10 - was a fourth-generation fighter in the bidding process, with the initial duck-wing design from the J-9 concept beating out the conventional layout inherited from the J-13 and the variable swept-back wing solution inherited from the Q-6, with the Air Force proposing both The J-10A was built in 1998, but unfortunately due to the outbreak of war with Wallachia a year later, Eurasia refused to deliver the AL-31FN engine due to economic sanctions against Greece, and only 18 J-10As were built using stock engines.

J-10P - the sudden change of events made the Greek Air Force, already looking forward to the new fighter, anxious and unable to resolve the situation, had to replace the engine back to the WP-15 (specifically the improved WP-15B model) from the initial Project 10 programme. The turbojet engine had a maximum thrust comparable to the turbofan engine, but the low speed performance, The range of the new aircraft was considerably reduced as a result of the far inferior acceleration response and fuel economy. To reduce costs the adjustable intake of the J-10A was also simplified to a fixed type, and the variant was originally called the J-10WP for turbojet engine, but was later simplified to J-10P, a name always teased by Greek pilots as the "J-10 'Poor' (poor) type "But it was also this poorly built fighter that took over from the J-7T in mass production in 2002 and became the new backbone of the Syldavian Air Force.

J-10AM - an in-house built AL-31FN or WS-16A engine finally went into production in mid-2006, and despite inheriting the problems of a notoriously low failure rate and short life span of the prototype, the J-10A could finally resume production, though the eight years of inactivity were not entirely wasted, as the J-10AM's avionics and The J-10AM's avionics and fire control systems were upgraded to be compatible with the PL-12 and various types of precision ground attack weapons, improving its combat capability against the air.

J-10S - the two-seat version of the J-10AM - is primarily tasked with enhanced ground attack and combat trainer duties, and the good visibility for rear-seat pilots has been well received by flight instructors who have switched from the JJ-7. The J-10S has also previously been stuck on the drawing board with engine problems that have prevented it from being realised, and although the first prototype was built in 2003 Although the first prototype was built in 2003, it only made its maiden flight using an AL-31FN removed from a J-10A, and was only mass-produced with the J-10AM in 2006 after an avionics upgrade.

J-10B - based on the J-10A - has undergone a number of modifications to adapt to modern air combat, the most significant of which is the maturation of the domestic WS-10 engine, which has been awaited for 10 years, with the engine replaced by the WS-10A, the air intake modified to a DSI intake more suited to supersonic air combat, the drogue and flaps The nose was changed from a conical shape to a flat cone shape, a passive phased array radar was installed, an electro-optical targeting system was installed in front of the cockpit and the electronic warfare module was upgraded.

J-10C - an improved version of the J-10B, virtually unchanged in appearance, with the engine replaced by a more powerful WS-10B, the radar replaced by a new active phased-array radar, and the avionics fire control system enhanced with sea strike and electronic warfare capabilities.

J-11A - an authorised Su-27S fighter - was the first fighter to be introduced from abroad in nearly forty years, with the first J-11A assembled from spare parts flying at the end of 1998. The J-11A was the most advanced fighter in the entire Syldavian Air Force at the outbreak of the war against Wallachia, and the only one that could take on the Su-27S of the Wallachian Air Force head-on (it was the same type), making the Syldavian Air Force realise for the first time that even heavy fighters could be so manoeuvrable. The J-11A was forced out of production after 100 had been built using 300 engines imported before the war.

J-11S - an authorised Su-27UB, a two-seat version of the J-11A with similarly impressive air combat capabilities, but only 20 were produced with stock engines, so they were generally used for heavy trainer flying and rarely in combat.

J-11B - a modernised version of the J-11A - uses a large number of composite materials to reduce the weight and increase the strength of the fuselage, is fully homologated and no longer has to rely on imported components from the inventory, and the most significant change in appearance is the integration of the wingtip electronic countermeasures pods into the internal electronic warfare module, freeing up the wingtip mounts. The J-11B's radar has been replaced with a domestically produced pulsed Doppler radar, greatly streamlining and optimising the prototype's large and cumbersome old avionics system. Although the J-11B first flew in 2003 and began production, the J-11B was constrained by engine supply problems and could only be built as a small number of empty hulls stacked on the factory's airfield without engines, awaiting the arrival of AL-31Fs captured from the Eurasian front and purchased from Eurasia before being delivered to the troops, an awkward situation until 2006 when the J-11B began mass production of the WS-16. mass production.

J-11BS - the two-seat version of the J-11B - was the first to use a digital telex flight control system instead of the J-11B's analogue telex system. The first prototype, which first flew in 2006, tried out Syldavia's own WS-10 turbofan engine, but soon suffered a number of serious mechanical failures and The production version was forced to be replaced back with the WS-16.

J-11C - The performance of the J-13 and Q-6 naval tactical fleet of the Syldavian Naval Air Force was becoming increasingly outdated into the 21st century, and the Syldavian Navy urgently needed an advanced multi-role fighter, with plans for a modification to the J-11B base, although due to the extent of the structural changes, the J -11C was renamed the J-15 series.

DJ-11 - As the Air Force's JH-7D electronic warfare aircraft became less survivable in high intensity air combat conditions and its flight performance could not keep up with the faster and more distant Syldavian Air Force with the installation of the J-11 series, the Air Force developed a new generation of electronic warfare aircraft based on the J-11BS, as the space inside the aircraft was heavily increased by the The J-11D - the J-11BS - is a new generation of electronic warfare aircraft based on the J-11BS, with the J-11BS being able to maintain a strong self-defence capability, although its manoeuvrability is slightly reduced due to the increased weight of the aircraft.

J-11D - a modernised version of the J-11B - is equipped with an advanced active phased array radar (AESA), in addition to the proven and improved digital telemetry of the J-11BS. The design features two additional heavy load points at the wing roots to improve weapons carrying capability.

J-11E - a two-seat version of the J-11D - has a greatly optimised datalink and command system, and is capable of air combat control. This is known as the "cloud attack" tactic.

J-15A - based on the J-11B, the J-11C was initially designed to have difficulty meeting the strength requirements of a naval fighter, but Syldavia acquired a T-10K (a prototype Su-33 naval fighter) from Laesia in Eastern Europe, penetrated its structure and integrated it with the existing J-11C design. The first J-15A with the WS-16 engine flew in 2007 and began gradually replacing the various J-13s in the carrier-based fighter force.

J-15S - a two-seat version of the J-15A - has the operational capability of a single-seat version, but is mainly responsible for the replacement of the Naval Air Force's J-13 pilots and the on-board training of J-11 pilots, another important task is the J-15A's eagerness to meet the problem of replacing naval air-to-air fighters, the Navy's original requirement of sea-to-sea The Navy's original requirement for a sea-to-ground attack capability was set aside as progress gave way, and the Navy's Q-6 fleet was therefore delayed in being replaced - capabilities that were tested and made practical on the J-15S. In addition the J-15S featured the WS-10H engine for the first time in the series, confirming that the engine could be used properly on a naval aircraft, and the part of the type that was replaced after the J-15C entered service was used as an FAC seat.

J-15M - The major difference in appearance between the J-15A and the Su-33 was that at the time Hilldavia had not yet fully mastered the tri-plane flight control system and in order to reduce the technical risk, the duck wing was removed, essentially reducing combat capability and maximum take-off weight, as technology improved in the J-15A the J-15M was perfected finally The J-15M also replaced the WS-10H engine and was initially equipped with the opposite attack fire control system used on the J-15S.

J-15B - a modernised version of the J-15M - makes extensive use of the J-11D's technology, including the AESA radar and structural upgrades to the fuselage, and significantly upgrades the fire control system, avionics and weapon carrying capability, providing full combat, interception, sea-to-ground attack and even some anti-submarine capability. The DJ-15 - based on the J-15 - has been upgraded significantly in terms of fire control system, avionics and weapon carrying capability.

DJ-15 - a naval electronic warfare aircraft based on the J-15S with modifications similar to the DJ-11, but unlike the Air Force's electronic warfare aircraft the DJ-15 will not only have the capability to defend itself in air combat, but will also take over the air defence suppression mission from the Q-6G, and will not be separately designed as a dedicated air defence suppression fighter like the J-16G. The J-15C - the J-16G - will not be designed separately as a dedicated anti-aircraft suppression aircraft.

J-15C, a two-seat version of the J-15B, incorporates the technical achievements of the J-11E and J-16 series and, with the advances in electronics technology that have improved the performance of the on-board computers, has a very powerful air-to-air and opposite combat capability and operational control. It is also the most expensive of all the Syldavian fourth generation fighters.

J-16 - a part of the Su-27M2 (a two-seat version of the Su-27M) was successfully stolen from Eurasia by a Hilldavian agent in 2000, and even the Greek Air Force, which had just introduced the Su27S (J-11A), was desperate to get its hands on this state-of-the-art Eurasia fighter under the pressure of war. The biggest weakness of the imitation effort, however, was that even if the aircraft could be copied, the engine could not be copied; Syldavia's own WS-10A was out of reach and there was no alternative to the Su-27M2's original AL41FS engine. The lack of engine thrust inevitably led to a reduction in performance, and the designers at Syldavia were forced to make drastic structural reductions to their drawings, with the result that the J-161 fuselage, used for stress testing, broke apart at only 73% of its design specification and the project was a complete failure.

The failure of the J-16A - the J-16 prototype - was a stinging blow to the Syldavian aviation industry, and the attempt did not go down in flames. The JH-7 series of fighter-bombers is more than useless and lacks the low altitude and high speed performance required for surprise defence. The J-10 series was a single-engine design with limited capability, and the Air Force wanted to add bombing capability to the J-11BS. Electronics are similar to those of the J-11BS, and the new fire control radar has improved terrain scanning and detection capabilities. The biggest change in appearance is due to the lack of a tri-plane flight control system (also because the fighter-bomber mission is less likely to require white-knuckle combat), the Su27M2's original duck wings have been removed, making it look very much like the Su27UB series and the Chinese J-11BS, but with an increased number of under-wing hangers, a twin-wheel configuration for the front landing gear as opposed to the single-wheel configuration of the first two, and a change in engine to the This resulted in a significant reduction in manoeuvrability compared to the Su27M2, but was still a huge leap forward from the JH-7 series, with the J-16A first flying in 2006, only slightly after the J-11BS.

J-16B - after the WS-10A engine finally became available in 2008 (a year that many Hildavan pilots referred to as the "engine spring") the J-16A was fitted with an improved version of the WS-10A engine, with more thrust. The J-16A's own engines improved its mobility and the corresponding fire control system was upgraded to allow it to perform more air-to-air missions than the J-11B, rather than simply being a replacement for the JH-7 series. Production of the J-11B had previously affected the J-16A because of the greater need for advanced fighters on the front line, a situation that was not rectified until the advent of the J-16B as a true "fighter-bomber", a new model popular with pilots that quickly rose in production priority to largely replace the JH-7. The production priority of this new model was rapidly increased and it finally took over the dominant position of the JH-7s and the operational capability of the Syldavian Air Force's strike fleet was increased by leaps and bounds.

J-16G - a dedicated anti-aircraft suppression version based on the J-16B - was still flying the old J-9G and J-8F/G on anti-radar missions in 2009. These old interceptor-based aircraft were faster but had limited range and bomb load, and the scope for upgrades had long been exhausted, which, combined with the inferior performance of the individual aircraft, made it necessary to team up several J-9Gs and J-8F/Gs for air defence suppression missions, a major inconvenience. The new generation of anti-aircraft suppression fighters have taken full advantage of the J-16B's airframe space to add a large number of self-defence electronic warfare systems on the basis of range and bomb load, greatly improving the anti-aircraft suppression aircraft's ability to survive in an airspace where anti-aircraft fire is plentiful.

J-16C - a modernised version of the J-16B, with a much improved digital telemetry flight control system and a higher thrust WS-10B engine finally made up for the loss of manoeuvrability caused by the removal of the duck wing. The fuller nose radar cone of the J-11D is equipped with a different type of AESA radar, which is more powerful and not only maintains the air-to-air search and fire control capability, but also greatly enhances the level of ground-to-sea search and surveillance, together with an overall upgraded fire control system, in addition to a significantly enhanced data chain, which not only strengthens its position in the combat network but also makes air-to-ground cooperation The air-to-ground cooperation has been improved. In addition, the fuselage structure has been significantly enhanced, with the fuselage centreline and underwing mount points both upgraded to the 2 tonne class, allowing the aircraft to mount a full five YJ-12 supersonic anti-ship missiles on anti-ship missions, far better than the JH-7 which could only mount four YJ-8 series, and the main landing gear has been replaced with twin wheels to cope with the greatly increased take-off weight.

J-16H - the patrol interceptor version of the J-16B - was designed because, as the war in the Old World was dying down, the Syldavian Army was faced with a confrontation with the Two Oceans Alliance across the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, during which there was constant conflict between the two sides, a lack of airfields and ground radar support over the vast expanse of the ocean, and the Navy's The J-16H was developed largely in parallel with the J-16C, and was equipped with the same telemetry flight controls and WS-10B engine, but with a different AESA radar - the J-16H was a different model. The AESA radar is different from the J-16C - there is no ground search and scan capability in exchange for the long-range air search and fire control capabilities that are among the best in the Hilldavia. The only difference in appearance from the J-16C is that the main landing gear remains in a single-wheel configuration.

J-16D - a further improvement on the J-16C, and arguably the technology proving ground for the fifth generation of fighters - not only integrates the air combat control capabilities of the J-11E but extends them further to include all aspects of opposite attack, with its integrated combat control system becoming the information hub for operations. Compared to the revolutionary upgrades to its electronics and operational approach, the changes to its appearance are rather limited - most notably the addition of the metal-coated glass polyhedral EOTS (electro-optical tracking and targeting system), nicknamed the "golden chin", below the right-hand air inlet. "It integrates the capabilities of the FLIS (Forward Looking Infrared System) navigation and indication pods long mounted on all Greek fighter-bombers and provides very powerful ground target imaging even in bad weather and low visibility, in addition to some air-to-air capability, and can be used in conjunction with the IRST in front of the cockpit of the J-9/11/15/16 series of fighters.

J-20A - the fifth generation twin-engine heavy fighter that Hilldavia has gone all out to create. Its slender and elegant stealthy fuselage is designed for high speed flight, and its duck layout with fully moving duck wings and drogue tail and powerful engine ternary vectoring nozzles give it great manoeuvrability. The J-20 first flew in 2010, and because a large number of subsystems had not yet been developed, it was still far short of its target performance. However, as the Air Force was desperate for an aircraft that could compete with the F-22 and F-23 fifth-generation fighters of the Two Oceans Alliance, about 10 additional J-20 technology proving aircraft were produced and equipped with the Air Force, under the designation J-20A, mainly for changeover training, and also participated in sporadic combat operations.

J-20B - the prototype of the J-20 series - has been modified to address the problems revealed during the technical proving phase, and its fuselage shape has also been fine-tuned, but like the technical proving aircraft it is still equipped with the WS-10B engine and therefore does not have supersonic cruise capability. The prototype is equipped with the proven EOTS system tested on the J-16D under the nose, and a more complete ground attack capability has been added to the fire control system rather than just an air-to-air fighter like the J-20A. Another major change is that for the first time, the prototype has been equipped with an optical conductivity manoeuvring system in volume, using fibre optics to achieve the huge advantage of being faster, more accurate and less susceptible to interference than the EOTS, and although it still does not meet all of its intended technical specifications, the Air Force has been overwhelmed by the excitement of ordering over fifty numbered J-20Bs to achieve initial combat capability.

J-20C - the long-awaited WS-15 high thrust turbofan engine is finally in place, its complete flight control and fire control software system has been written and troubleshot, the plasma electromagnetic jamming system is installed, and another huge breakthrough in the electronics system is the EODAS (electro-optical, distributed aperture system) consisting of sensors distributed throughout the aircraft. In 2013, after lengthy test flights and extensive combat testing, the J-20 finally met the technical specifications set out at the start of the project - namely the "4S" (4S) system. -The "4S" (Stealth; SuperSonicCruise; SuperManeuverability); SuperiorAvionicsforBattleAwarenessandEffectiveness. After acceptance test flights, the aircraft was then put into full-scale production as the J-20C, marking the beginning of a new era in which Syldavia was finally equipped with a world class advanced fighter.

J-20H - the Navy's proposed naval stealth fighter. Although at the beginning of the project the Navy's upper echelons were quite critical of the J-20's large, slender fuselage, preferring the smaller FC-31 fighter for carrier use, pilots who had flown missions in the J-15 series were strongly in favour of the heavy naval fighter, coupled with the The J-20H was basically developed in parallel with the shore-based J-20A/B/C, with major changes in appearance: the wings were replaced by folding wings with reduced leading edge sweep angle and greatly expanded wingspan and wing area, the ventral fins were eliminated, the landing gear was strengthened and landing hooks were added, and the engines were also strengthened. The J-20H prototype first flew in 2013, and with the help of highly intelligent on-board electronic systems to record data, test flights progressed at a rapid pace, and mass production began shortly after the first flight, with the J-20H being fitted with the Hilldavian Navy's naval ship that year. equipped with the Hilldavia Naval Carrier Air Force unit.

Q-5 - The ground support capability of the Syldavian tactical air force stagnated into the 1960s, with the IL-10s still the slow piston fighters that had been finalised at the end of the Second World War, and although some of the MiG-15s that had been replaced from the fighter force were temporarily given to the The MiG-15s were temporarily replaced from the fighter force, but their small bomb load and lack of protection led to the conversion of the J-6 to a jet fighter with two air intakes. The first flight took place in 3549 (1966 AD).

Q-5GS - a special attack variant of the Q-5, with a semi-buried hanger in the belly for the 2,000kg drill bomb used to attack underground bunkers - was nicknamed the "Grand Slam" (Grand Slam) by military personnel and engineers during testing in response to the devastating effect of the drill bomb on underground bunkers. Grand Slam", hence the official designation Q-5GS, as the G type was often misunderstood as it stood for anti-aircraft suppressor in the Syldavia aircraft numbering system, and only a small number of Q-5GS were built.

Q-5H - the naval version of the Q-5, with larger folding wings, stronger landing gear and fuselage, more landing hooks, and the elimination of the ventral bomb bay and replacement with a fuel tank to increase range.

Q-5A - In response to the Air Force's criticism of the Q-5's short range, the Q-5H was replaced with a naval Q-5H that had its ventral bomb bay and fuel tanks removed. A larger thrust engine was fitted and additional mounting points were added to compensate for the elimination of the bomb bay.

Q-5C - A modern improvement on the Q-5A, with improved drop fire control systems and the introduction of composite materials to reduce the weight of the airframe.

The Q-5B - an improved missile attack version of the Q-5H, although the project predates the Q-5C, the schedule has been delayed due to the scope of the improvements. The Q-5B is the first of the Q-5 series to have all-weather strike capability, thanks to its infra-red night vision system.

Q-5D - an electronically improved version of the Q-5C, with additional flight and fire control computers on board and the infra-red night vision system tested on the Q-5B, as well as some changes to the wing design.

QZ-5H - the result of the Navy's reuse of Q-5Hs replaced from frontline units after the advent of the Q-5B, the right side gun and bomb bay were removed to enlarge the fuel tanks, all air-to-air fire control systems were removed along with the mountings to reduce weight and only the low self-defence air combat capability of carrying PL-2 missiles was retained, the nose cone was replaced with a new design The nose cone was replaced with a new design, with a large aerial camera inside. Prior to this the Syldavian Naval Air Force had lacked a dedicated naval reconnaissance aircraft and had to carry reconnaissance pods in fighters, but the camera performance was limited by the size of the pods and the drag of the external pods also affected the performance of the reconnaissance aircraft.

Q-5E - a precision attack variant of the Q-5D with fewer mount points but the ability to use laser-guided bombs, an additional electro-optical indicator window under the nose for TV-guided air-to-ground missiles and an optional large conformal fuel tank in the belly to increase range.

Q-5F - a target guidance variant of the Q-5D - is limited by the size of the Q-5 and the Q-5E cannot carry a laser guidance pod despite being able to carry laser-guided bombs. This largely removes the direct ground attack capability, leaving only a few mount points for self-defence air-to-air missiles.

Q-5S - a naval trainer with the Q-5B's fire control radar removed and an instructor cabin behind the cockpit - replaces the long-serving JJ-4 naval trainer in the Naval Air Service, but the Q-5S still has ground attack and some air combat capability and is also used as a Forward Air Control Officer (FAC) aircraft in support of the Marines. The Q-5L - the Q-5L - is a naval trainer aircraft with a ground attack and some air combat capability.

Q-5L - a wartime modification of the Q-5D - was designed for low-cost mass production in response to the heavy losses of the Syldavian Air Force's Q-5s during the war, improving the versatility and manufacturability of its components to allow more civilian industry to convert them to production. The cost of the aircraft has been significantly reduced and the thickness of the cockpit alloy armour has been increased to improve pilot survivability.

DQ-5 - an electronic warfare aircraft based on the Q-5S - was a real-world experience that showed that the Q-6G's anti-aircraft suppression alone could not guarantee that the Navy's fleet of ships would not be intercepted by anti-aircraft missile fire when attacking targets. The decision was made to convert the Q-5S's rear seat instructor compartment directly into a jamming equipment compartment and to add jamming equipment antennas throughout the fuselage, for which the DQ-5 removed its guns to make room for the jamming equipment. The DQ-5 electronic warfare aircraft entered production service only a month and a half after the design specifications were presented, setting a speed record.

Q-5T - Q-5L two-seat version, in view of the small size of the JL-8 trainer, which was initially used as the FAC's seat during the war, lacked protection, and the JH-7 series, which was used as a replacement, had a large bomb load and a long range, but did not have the same low altitude and low speed performance, plus the large size of the aircraft was not as survivable as the JL-8 under the threat of enemy fire. The Air Force looked to the Marine Air Corps' Q-5S at this time and modified a similar two-seat dedicated FAC seat based on its own Q-5L, in addition to supplementing the attrition of the JJ-6 in the trainer fleet.

Q-6A - In the mid to late 1970s the Syldavian Navy found that when faced with a confrontation in the Pacific with the two oceanic alliance fleets its ships often faced a dual threat from the other side's surface ships and airmen, and that its carriers were not only inferior in numbers but also in performance, so the Navy wanted a long-range shore-based attack aircraft with air combat capability. At the same time, the Air Force was also planning a new generation of high-speed bombers to replace the outdated H-5 and Q-5, which had insufficient bomb load, and in order to save resources the country requested a joint tender for the Navy and Air Force to solve all problems with a new model. The JH-7, JH-8 and Q-6 were among the three models that participated in the tender. The Q-6 supersonic aircraft was the most innovative in appearance, with a variable swept-back wing design for the first time in the Greek military aircraft, based on a mapping of the former Hijaz Air Force MiG-23MS provided by Parthia. The front fuselage was similar in appearance to the F-16s, which were soon to be equipped by the Atlantic Confederation at the time, and the engines were ambitious WS-6s, as were many of its own fighters of the period. The Q-6 not only inherited its electronics from the MiG-23, but also, for the purpose of high speed precision strike, it was fitted with the highly capable ground fire control system that had been captured from the Atlantic Federation F-111 supersonic attack aircraft that was crashed during the Granada War. However, the complex variable swept wing was difficult to replicate, and the Greek designers' efforts to make the rotating structure 12 per cent heavier than the prototype and with a less than satisfactory failure rate, and the avionics and fire control systems, which were designed for full operational performance, were heavily overweight due to the large number of electronic tubes from the replica, as well as the disappointing failures of the WS-6 engine, which led the Air Force to request that the project be withdrawn to save money. The Navy opted for the more secure JH-7 as a shore-based long-range attack aircraft, while Project 10 (later J-10) and the introduction of the Su-27 (later J-11) were invested in.

Q-6F - the unsuccessful attack aircraft competitor for the Q-6's bid to rejoin the Air Force's new generation of fighters, and the engine was replaced with the same R-29 as the prototype MiG-23, coinciding with the two rival J-13s and J-10s, this time the Q-6F lost even more completely, with the bid being awarded at the outset This time the Q-6F lost out even more, as it was swept out of the competition by the simple fighter J-13, and then the Air Force became enamoured of the more fashionable tail-less duck-wing layout, which led to the J-10 becoming the next generation of fighters for the Syldavian Air Force, while the Q-6 failed twice in a row without a single prototype being built, with only full-size models to show for it.

Q-6M - the last straw in the Q-6 series' attempt to capture the export market - was powered by the fuel-efficient and reliable WS-9 engine (also used in the JH-7 series), but while the JH-7 was able to fly with two WS-9s, the Q-6M, despite its slightly smaller size, was seriously underpowered by just one WS-9. The Q-6M, despite its small size, was severely underpowered and its scaled-down model was unpopular at airshows, so no prototype was built.

Q-6H - it was only in the 1990s that Naval Air Forces, which was accustomed to going through the motions due to lack of funds, suddenly realised that its own naval strike force was equipped with the J-5B, which was seriously out of date, and its operational radius with a full missile load was even smaller than the alert range of the two Ocean Alliance carrier battle groups equipped with the E-2 naval early warning aircraft, making it difficult to find a more reliable aircraft. The Q-6 was pulled out of its grave by Naval Air Forces, which had abandoned the carrier battle group and dumped all long-range interceptor anti-ship attack and land strike duties onto the Q-6's shoulders. Due to the lack of space for the carrier's greatly enhanced forward landing gear, Naval Air Forces ordered the factory to convert it back to the MiG-23's two-sided air intake, and to speed up the process Naval Air Forces went to great lengths to purchase a retired Eurasian Navy MiG-23A carrier fighter from the black market as a reference copy. Finally, in 1992, the Q-6H, which was already very different from the original Q-6, made its maiden flight and Naval Air Forces finally got a MiG-23A of its own making. However, the Q-6H still shows signs of being rushed - the ground-to-ground fire control system was not completed in time for testing and the Q-6H only has a limited ground-to-sea attack capability using rockets and unguided munitions.

Q-6B - Naval Air Forces paid the price for its impatience, as the Q-6H received a rather poor reputation after equipping the force, with maximum flight elevation being strictly limited or risking sudden loss of control, and an awkward response in combat air combat, not only being completely unable to outmaneuver the nimble J-13, but even being outclassed by its predecessor, the Q-5B. Worst of all, due to the crude mechanical design, the Q-6H often suffered from inconsistent flap and leading edge seam movement during landing, which sometimes led to sudden lift imbalance during landing - a fact that led to a number of serious accidents. All this led to a number of naval attack/interceptor units refusing to continue to use the Q-6H and requesting a return to the obsolete Q-5B, a request which was acceded to by Naval Air Forces who took it off the carrier for use as a shore-based aircraft and demanded that production of the Q-6H be stopped and that improvements be made or all remaining orders would be cancelled. The Q-6H's flight quality problems were first addressed - the solution was to extend the wing sleeve of the swept-back wing by adding side strips and to replace the engine with a more powerful WP-15B (an improved version of the R-29 R-35-300 turbojet engine). The fly-by-wire system was finally installed, and the previously manually-controlled variable swept wing was converted to the same airspeed-based infinitely automatic control system as the F-14 (the manual controls were retained as a back-up), an electronic synchronisation system was added to the flaps and slits, and a downward-looking display was added to the cockpit to simplify the cumbersome instrumentation system. -The biggest problem was the crude workmanship of the prototype MiG-23s made in Eurasia, which was largely solved by a series of improvements at the factory. -although still without a ground-to-ground fire control system.

Q-6C - the first of the Q-6 series to be equipped with a variable swept wing - was much more complex than the previous types to handle, especially as it had to be flown on board and landed, and even the updated Q-5S was out of step with the new model, so Naval Air Forces requested a two-seat combat trainer with the Q-6 as soon as possible. The two-seater Q-6C is based on the fuselage of the Q-6B, with a second cockpit designed behind the original cockpit in reference to the MiG-23UB. The instructor's cabin is higher and has a good view (compared to the poor instructor's view of the JJ-7, which had to rely on a periscope for effective observation). The Q-6C retains the radar and full air-to-air fire control system of the Q-6B, allowing it to perform the same air defence and interception missions, with a reduced range and top speed compared to the Q-6B only due to the addition of a second member, and the Q-6C has an additional section of ridge behind the raised rear cockpit cover to accommodate the electronics squeezed into the additional cockpit space. The cost of the Q-6C was even higher than that of the Q-6B due to the uncut combat systems, which was too extravagant for Naval Air Forces, which had not yet replaced all the Q-5Bs on the carrier, and the troops demanded that the Q-6C's radar be cut to make way for the fighters. To make way for this, production of the Q-6C ceased after only forty or so had been built and was used mainly for shore-based training and the development and testing of ground-to-sea fire control systems.

Q-6D - the strike trainer of the Q-6 series - removed the radar and most of the air combat fire control systems from the Q-6C, retaining only the ability to use infra-red combat missiles for self-defence air combat. To balance the weight change caused by the elimination of the radar, the Q-6D's twin 23mm Gast guns with their ammunition tanks were repositioned in the belly above the nose cone (similar in structure to the F-5), while the space previously occupied by the guns was expanded by the fuel tanks, resulting in a slight increase in range compared to the Q-6C, and an optical/laser window was added below the nose cone in reference to the original Hijaz MiG-23BN attack aircraft acquired from Parthia. For the first time in Greek naval aircraft, the MiG-23BN is capable of guiding KD-88 and C-701 TV-guided air-to-ground missiles, as well as guiding laser-guided bombs without the need to mount a laser designation pod. To receive TV signals from TV-guided munitions, the Q-6D has an expanded fairing on the right wing sleeve to accommodate the receiving antenna, and a symmetrical expansion on the left wing sleeve to accommodate a camera gun that had to be moved because of the cramped nose space. For the first time in the series, the Q-6D was not simply used as a naval trainer, but more as an attack aircraft in the Fleet Air Arm and the Marine Air Corps, even using its speed to navigate and direct targets for the JH-7 fleet leader of the Marine Air Corps.

Q-6J - The Q-6D's precision ground attack capability was of little use to rookie pilots who had just left the ship's advanced trainers to familiarise themselves with variable swept wing fighters, and at the Navy's stingy request the Q-6D had to once again trim its avionics and remove all ground attack fire control systems, with the nose optical window blocked off and only Even the WP-15 engine had been stripped of its pressurised combustion chambers and was therefore not capable of supersonic flight. The Q-6D, which was economical enough to be designated as the Q-6J, was only used as a shore-based trainer for the Seabees.

Q-6E - With the complete fire control system of the Q-6 series gradually developed and tested on the Q-6C, the Navy finally got a single-seat Q-6 with full sea-to-land precision strike capability, and the Q-6E's fire control radar was therefore much more versatile, and the nose radar cone had a more rounded shape than that of the Q-6B. The most significant change to the Q-6E's appearance is the addition of a pair of wing swivel hangers. All previous MiG-23s and Q-6s were sometimes equipped with wing hangers for carrying fuel tanks, but because they were fixed to the wings they could only be used at a minimum swept back angle of 16° and once the swept back angle changed the hangers were discarded to prevent accidents. The new swivel hanger can be moved in response to changes in sweptback angle. In addition to this, the Q-6D pilots were surprised to discover during use that the added bulge in the wing sleeve on both sides created a vortex at low speed, providing additional lift, and the Q-6E had two spoilers on the wing sleeve with less drag to achieve the same effect. Although more improvements were planned, development was frozen by the Navy for "reasons that cannot be disclosed to manufacturers" before mass production began, so the first Q-6Es were able to urgently replace all Q-5Bs in the Fleet Air Arm half a month before the outbreak of the Khiva War.

The speed advantage of the QZ-6H - a variable swept wing fighter at maximum swept back angle - was obvious, even after Syldavia had equipped the J-8 and J-9 series of interceptors designed for high altitude and speed, and in comparative test flights with the Marine Air Corps J-8B Naval Air Forces found that at However, the Q-5B had just been equipped and had a large equipment gap to fill, so it had to settle for a dozen Q-6Hs that had been returned to shore airfields. The best condition Q-6Hs were upgraded to the same WP-15B engine as the Q-6B, the radar and most of the fire control systems were removed, including the guns, and the Q-6D's fuel tanks were enlarged and the slimmer nose cone was redesigned to accommodate an aerial reconnaissance camera, and the wing sleeve mounts were removed to reduce drag. The QZ-6H still retains the ability to mount infra-red combat missiles on the fuselage mount for self-defence, but in combat pilots generally trusted that the key to their escape was higher speed and therefore more chose not to mount missiles to reduce drag.

Q-6L - When the war broke out the Syldavian Army found that the Air Force's various Q-5s lacked the ability to hit mobile hard targets, with the guns struggling to penetrate the heavy armour of the TR-125 tank even with tungsten armour-piercing rounds, and rockets and bombs struggling to hit. The JH-7 fighter-bomber, because of its size and low altitude and speed, was more likely to carry out deep bombing missions than CAS, so the Q-6D, equipped by the NAVFAC and the Marine Air Corps, together with the C-701 TV-guided missile, which was intended to be used for anti-ship purposes, unexpectedly became the most popular tank killer with front-line land forces, although the Q-6D also revealed its lack of armour protection as a front-line attack aircraft and its tendency to lose two pilots at a time if shot down (which happened more often on the brutal land front). The Q-6N was based on the Q-6D, with the elimination of the second member, the removal of the landing hook and other equipment used on board, and the armouring of the pilot's cockpit (essentially returning to the shape of the prototype MiG-23BN), which can be seen on the side. The armour plates protruding from the fuselage are clearly visible on the sides, although the original enhanced landing gear has been retained for landing and taking off from rough field airfields, but with wider, low-pressure tyres. Due to the cost of the variable swept wing fighters, the Air Force did not replace the Q-5 series with Q-6Ls as had been planned over twenty years earlier, opting instead to continue to build a large number of Q-5Ls as the mainstay of the strong-arm group to charge ahead and eliminate soft targets such as armoured vehicles, trucks, other logistic vehicles, artillery and personnel, leaving the remaining tanks to be dealt with by the Q-6Ls that followed.

Q-6K - the type of Q-6L that reverted to landing hooks - is primarily used for maritime support of Marine landing operations, and therefore reverted to shipboard take-off and landing capability, although the Q-6K is normally deployed only to Marine Air Corps land bases and does not crowd the carrier's valuable hangar space, and is only used when required for missions The carrier will only adjust its fleet configuration to bring the Q-6K on board for temporary deployment when the mission is required.

Q-6M - a step in the modernisation of the Navy's fleet in tandem with the J-13C - features upgraded engines to WP-15H, a composite fuselage to reduce weight while increasing strength and service life, upgraded avionics, and a new flat three-down cockpit layout that finally alleviates the Q-6E's need for a single mission information unit due to the increased ground-to-sea mission capability. The addition of an IRST system in front of the cockpit windscreen and the integration of PL-12 active radar-guided air-to-air missiles has greatly improved the Q-6's combat capability in air-to-air interdiction missions.

Q-6G - with the increased ground attack capability of the Hilldavia Seafarer, it is increasingly flying deep inland strike missions and inevitably encountering the threat of enemy air defence missiles, the Seafarer therefore found itself without a suitable air defence suppression aircraft and initially had the common sense to mount jamming pods on the Q-5E for this task but This was a setback to the Navy's pride - as the Q-6M became more computerised, there was more room for self-defence electronic warfare equipment, and the Air Force modified its own aircraft on this basis. The Q-6G's wing sleeve, like that of the Q-6D series, had an expanded fairing due to the increased electronics, and this became the main difference between the Q-6 and the other combat attack aircraft.

Q-6N - A modernised and upgraded version of the Q-6K, the Q-6N incorporates most of the upgraded elements of the Q-6M, including upgraded engines, avionics and airframe materials to allow compatibility with more advanced precision-guided weapons, plus a greatly enhanced data link system to improve battlefield information exchange.

QZ-6B - As the Q-6M continued to enter service and began to replace the Q-6B, Naval Air Forces finally had enough Q-6Bs to convert to tactical reconnaissance aircraft, but as the battlefield changed and the understanding of air warfare deepened Naval Air Forces also had a new understanding of reconnaissance aircraft: what was needed more on the front line was combat reconnaissance aircraft, and air combat capability The QZ-6B therefore did not replace the nose radar and retained most of its fire control system, the only change being the removal of the twin 23mm guns from the belly and their replacement with a slightly longer camera fairing containing a large long focal length mechanical aerial camera through the fuselage and four new smaller digital aerial cameras.

Q-6P - the Naval Air Arm's long-duration maritime patrol and surveillance fighter - compensates for the shortcomings of the existing Q-6 and J-8II series by taking full advantage of the variable swept-wing fighter's ability to fly more economically at small swept-back angles for long periods at medium speed. The Q-6P is based on the Q-6M, with a slightly extended nose cockpit section to accommodate the rear seat weapons officer, and is designed so that there is no partition between the front and rear, with two pilots sharing a single cockpit cover. However, the rear seat of the Q-6P is much narrower than that of the Q-6C/D and lacks the good visibility of the latter's cockpit. The Q-6P retains the ability to land and take off from the ship, but is more often deployed ashore on the SEA's bases.

Q-6Q - A modernised version of the Q-6L, it is essentially the same as the Q-6N, except for the difference between the original landing hook and the Q-6N, although the Air Force retained the Q-6L's WP-15B engine and did not replace it as it was not primarily used at sea.

Q-6R - A special reconnaissance version based on the QZ-6B, replacing the original reconnaissance camera with a synthetic aperture radar encased in a long fairing on the belly of the aircraft, the original fire control radar and all weapon systems were removed to reduce weight and to keep the radar powered.

Q-6S - as opposed to the A-10 and Su-25, the two most successful anti-aircraft aircraft - was considered by many Syldavian admirals to have insufficient firepower from the Q-6's twin-barrelled 23mm gun, so as a test, the Navy transplanted the six-barrelled 30mm transfer gun used on its ships to the nose of the Q-6Q. The Q-6S was a very powerful gun, but the lack of available armour-piercing ammunition meant that it was still unable to deal with heavily protected targets, and after a period of service the Q-6S found that the recoil of the gun caused a number of annoying stress cracks in the hull.

Q-6T - While the J-13 series on the same carrier deck was busy replacing its various new turbofan engines, the Q-6 series remained loyal to the less advanced but reliable WP-15H, and even as the Q-6M was about to be replaced by the J-15 series it continued to improve to stand its last watch for seafaring. The improvements to the Q-6T are still mainly in the area of avionics, increasing the level of information technology and the number of compatible weapons.

Q-6X - to complement the strategic interceptor network woven by the Air Force's RJ-9C - will also see the Navy's carrier battle groups serve as surveillance and first wave meet nodes for homeland air defence in the Pacific Ocean east of Syldavia, but the Navy's existing Q-6Ms, at speeds of up to Mach 2.3, have difficulty intercepting strategic class targets above Mach 3. However, the Navy's existing Q-6M, with a speed of up to Mach 2.3, has difficulty intercepting strategic targets above Mach 3, so the Navy has also introduced the Q-6 series of naval strategic interceptors based on the technology of the RJ-9CM and the Q-6T, which is under development at the same time. The Q-6X did not have the same radical changes to the prototype as the R-9 series in terms of aerodynamic layout to ensure safe take-off and landing, but all the original weapon systems were removed and a conformal fuel tank similar to that of the Q-6P was added outside the intake, but only one third of the volume was fuel and the other two thirds was distilled water to be injected into the engine for the Mach 2.8 high-speed sprint. The Q-6X is powered by the same WP-15R engine as the R-9 series, which has a significantly reduced low-speed capability compared to the original WP-15H, so it will normally carry a rocket booster in the rear fuselage to support it during take-off and will also need to be used with great care during landing.

(To be continued)
 
Last edited:

Similar threads

Top