1972 Dornier fighter projects

hesham

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Hi,

the Dornier sutdied in 1972 to develope an aircraft which was based
on or look like the SAAB-37 Viggen,and also designed a very beautiful
lightweight V/STOL fighter,I never heard about them before.

http://www.flightglobal.com/FlightPDFArchive/1972/1972%20-%202852.pdf
 

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overscan (PaulMM)

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Air superiority fighter

Dornier anticipates a Nato requirement in the early 1980s for a lightweight (less than 10,000kg gross) air-superiority fighter. The company's studies assume a "moderate" thrust to-weight ratio, slightly above unity, but with a low wing loading to provide most of the manoeuvrability. Low wing loading allows the aircraft to fly at a lower lift coefficient, thus reducing the induced drag and allowing high-g manoeuvres to be maintained. Extreme speed above Mach 2 is not a requirement, nor is long range—both would lead to a bigger aircraft. Dornier favours a twin-engined single seat canard layout for such an aircraft, which is in the Northrop P-530 class. Advantages claimed, for canards are:

• Spacious main wing to accommodate a wide-track undercarriage as well as fuel (drop tanks would also be carried).
• Lift changes are in the "correct" sense during trimming, using the foreplane.
• Excellent roll characteristics.
 

overscan (PaulMM)

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Light V/stol fighter

Dornier is studying a "light, hoverable combat aircraft" as a substitute for armed helicopters under conditions of enemy air superiority. It is primarily a tank-killer project. The intake to the gas generator has a tortuous shape in this Dornier study of a lightweight V/Stol fighter. The type might be an alternative to the "tank-buster" armed helicopter. It uses tip-driven remote fans and is derived from work on the Aerodyne wingless reconnaissance vehicle Such a type would need to be cheap, small (G.91 size) and able to operate from dispersed sites, but be able to reach High subsonic speeds and to defend itself against enemy fighters.

Helicopter escort and attack would demand good lowspeed manoeuvrability, and there could be advantages in making missile attacks on tanks from the hover. Taking technology derived from the Aerodyne wingless reconnaissance vehicle a stage further, the fighter project would use twin tip-turbine-driven fans with cascade deflectors for Vtol performance. (Hawker Siddeley Dynamics and Dornier
are now jointly studying wingless reconnaissance vehicles.)

In principle a tip-turbine-driven fan for the fighter is available from General Electric. It is used as a horizontal fan in the wings of the Ryan XV-5A Vtol research aircraft. Dornier says such gas-driven fans, if mounted in suitable ducts, can produce pressure ratios of between 1-15:1 and 1-5:1, and can be used at up to near-sonic speeds. When integrated as closely as possible into the wing, such a propulsion system can induce, says Dornier, a jet-flap effect beneficial to high-speed combat manoeuvrability at low cascade deflection angles. Dormer says that the radius of action of the type depicted here would be 320 st miles, 200km with a 2,000Lb, 1,000kg-plus weapon load on a lo-lo, high-speed mission.

Shaft-driven fans have been investigated, but are not as advantageous except at lower fan pressure ratios (optimum would be 1.1:1), when hover endurance would be higher than for gas-driven units. Although the weight of the shaft engine is reduced with
decreasing pressure ratio, the weights of fans, gearboxes and airframe increase considerably, which results in a reduction of the useful load. With increasing fan pressure ratio, gas-generator power and fuel consumption increase as well. On the other hand, high-speed performance, manoeuvrability and radius of action are improved. The amount of useful load remains almost constant, since the increasing gas generator weight is offset by decreasing fan and airframe weights. The wing would be sized primarily on the basis of combat-manoeuvrability requirements.
 

Jemiba

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LSK stould for "leichtes, schwebefähiges Kampfflugzeug", in English : light, hoverable combat aircrafas already mentioned in Paul's post.
This not only would have been a technical challenge, but a new type of mission for a fixed wing aircraft,
because AFAIK the only V/STOL jet fighters actually shooting during hovering flight were to be seen in Arnie's "True Lies"
(AV-8B) and in Bruce Willi's "Die Hard IV" (F-35).
As a side note: Would it be feasible ? Could imagine, that there would be problems due to hot gas ingestions or vibrations.
 

hesham

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Thank you for the info my dear Jemiba.
 

Pioneer

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Very interesting find gents!!

Would be great to see more!! ;)

Regards
Pioneer
 

ouroboros

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Seems like a different take on the RIVET approach to mounting the engine backwards. Seems like the next step after jet flaps would be some sort of tilt wing, but has anyone seriously proposed a tilting gas driven fan approach to VTOL, due to the complexity of the rotating tilt joint having to accommodate the gas duct?
 

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