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21
Early Aircraft Projects / Arsenal VG-30 variants
« Last post by blackkite on Yesterday at 09:55:14 pm »
Hi! Arsenal VG-30 variants.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arsenal_VG-33

"The Arsenal VG-33 was one of a series of fast French light fighter aircraft under development at the start of World War II, but which matured too late to see extensive service in the French Air Force during the Battle of France.

VG-30 – The original powerplant was the Potez 12Dc flat-12 air-cooled inline engine, but the prototype was fitted with a Hispano-Suiza 12Xcrs, and flew in this form in October 1938.
VG-31 – Hispano-Suiza 12Y-31 powered prototype.
VG-32 – Allison V-1710C-15 powered prototype.
VG-33 – First production model with Hispano-Suiza 12Y-31 engine (160 near completion at Fall of France. Unknown number completed.)
VG-34 – 697 kW (935 hp) Hispano-Suiza 12Y-45 engine. 360 mph (600 km/h). Prototype only.
VG-35 – VG-33 variant with newer engine. One built.
VG-36 – 746 kW (1,000 hp) Hispano-Suiza 12Y-51 engine. Prototype only.
VG-37 – Extended-range version of the VG-36. Not built.
VG-38 – projected for Hispano-Suiza 12Y-77 engine. Not built.
VG-39 – 954 kW (1,280 hp) Hispano-Suiza 12Z engine. 393 mph (655 km/h). 6x 7.5 mm MAC 1934 machine guns. Prototype only.
VG-39bis – proposed production version powered by a Hispano-Suiza 12Z-17.
VG-40 – projected variant powered by a Rolls Royce Merlin III.
VG-50 – projected variant powered by an Allison V-1710-39. (N.B. The designation VG 50 was also used for a projected four-engined trans-atlantic transport)
VG-60 – The ultimate projected variant powered by a 1,000 hp Hispano-Suiza 12Y-51 supercharged by a two-stage Sidlowsky-Planiol turbo-charger."

http://rejpalek.blog.cz/0908/arsenal-vg-32

http://www.airwar.ru/enc/fww2/vg30.html
23
The Bar / Re: Nuclear Weapons - Discussion.
« Last post by bobbymike on Yesterday at 09:46:51 pm »

William J. Perry, former Secretary of Defense, and  General James E. Cartwright, former Vice Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff; former Commander, U.S. Strategic Command, again.

And?  Is that suppose to make them perfect?  As I recall, William Perry was the one who spilled the beans on the stealth bomber (B-2) to make his boss look good, no?
Don't care who it is evaluate what they said it's not a game of 'credential poker' hey I have two former SecDefs, an undersecretary and a physicist does that beat your experts in credential poker?

What I meant was that William J. Perry and General James E. Cartwright were back making the same arguments in The Washington Post opinion piece that we have already read in their letter to President Donald Trump.
Then I apologize or my incorrect inference. 
24
Aerospace / Re: Japanese next generation fighter study
« Last post by kcran567 on Yesterday at 07:47:20 pm »
Any reason the main wing is not more of a diamond planform? If they are improving on a basic "F-22 type" design why the swept trailing edge?
25
Aerospace / Re: Sikorsky CH-53K Super Stallion Heavy Lift Replacement (HLR)
« Last post by Triton on Yesterday at 06:49:55 pm »
"Israeli Air Force Takes CH-53K Ride After US Congress Urges Sale"
by S.L. Fuller | November 17, 2017

Source:
http://www.rotorandwing.com/2017/11/17/israeli-air-force-takes-ch-53k-ride-us-congress-urges-sale/

Quote
Sikorsky’s CH-53K King Stallion flew a 90-minute orientation test flight — a “first of its kind,” according to the U.S. Naval Air Systems Command (Navair). The flight was hosted at Navair's Patuxent River, Maryland, facility for Brig. Gen. Nir Nin-Nun, commander of air support and helicopter division for the Israeli Air Force. It occurred during a scheduled test flight.

Navair said yesterday that Nov. 7, the aircraft performed various operational maneuvers, landings and takeoffs. Nin-Nun was able to get a firsthand look at the CH-53K’s full authority fly-by-wire flight controls. He also completed a familiarization flight in the simulator and safety brief before his ride, Navair said. The flight was arranged based on a government-to-government request from Nin-Nun and made possible through a contract modification between Sikorsky and Navair.

“This is the first time we have flown an international ally in the CH-53K,” said U.S. Marine Corps Col. Hank Vanderborght, program manager for the H-53 Heavy Lift Helicopters program office, PMA-261. “Flights like this give us an opportunity to strengthen relationships with our allies while sharing a taste of America’s next generation heavy lift helicopter.”

In April, multiple U.S. senators and representatives targeted Israel to solicit a CH-53K deal. While cost was not explicitly named a motivator for the members of Congress, successful procurement could bring down the price. PMA-261 works with international partners through the Foreign Military Sales program to potentially meet the international partners’ heavy lift helicopter requirements, Navair said. The more helicopters the government sells to international buyers, the more unit cost is decreased for all users. Navair told R&WI in March that the cost per unit is some $87 million at production, not including other costs. The program has come under scrutiny for its high price tag.

There are four engineering development and manufacturing King Stallion models in test, and one ground test vehicle. Together, they have logged more than 606 flight hours, according to Navair. The program is still on track to reach initial operational capability in 2019, which would have four aircraft with combat-ready crews logistically prepared to deploy. Navair said the U.S. Department of Defense’s program of record still calls for 200 aircraft.
26
Early Aircraft Projects / Re: Bloch unbuilt designs and prototypes
« Last post by blackkite on Yesterday at 06:31:27 pm »
Hi! MB.150 video.
27
Propulsion / What-if Engines
« Last post by simmie on Yesterday at 06:17:25 pm »
Over the summer I found myself with some spare time and an over active imagination.  So I came up with a few what-if engines, some of the dimensions might be a little off as I haven't used trig for about 25 years since college.

X-24 Merlin
•   Type: X-24 supercharged liquid-cooled piston engine
•   Bore: 5.4 inches
•   (137 mm)
•   Stroke: 6.0 inches
•   (152 mm)
•   Displacement:
•   3298 in³ (54 L)
•   Length 88.7 in
•   (2250 mm)
•   Width 43.43 in
•   (1103.09 mm)
•   Height 43.43 in
•   (1103.09 mm)

H-24 Merlin
•   Type: Liquid-cooled H24 engine
•   Bore: 5.4 in
•   (137 mm)
•   Stroke: 6.0 in
•   (152 mm)
•   Displacement:
•   3298 in³ (54 L)
•   Length: 88.7 in
•   (2250 mm)
•   Width: 43 in
•   (1092 mm)
•   Height: 61.42 in
•   (1560 mm)

W-18 Merlin
•   Type: W-18 water-cooled in-line engine
•   Bore: 5.4in
•   (137mm)
•   Stroke: 6.0 in
•   (152 mm)
•   Displacement:
•   2473 in3 ( 40.5 L)
•   Length 88.7 in
•   (2250 mm)
•   Width 53.19 in
•   (1350.99 mm)
•   Height 44.27 in
•   (1124.5 mm)

V-16 Merlin
•   Type: 16-cylinder, supercharged, liquid-cooled, 60° V, piston aircraft engine.
•   Bore: 5.4 in
•   (137 mm)
•   Stroke: 6.0 in
•   (152 mm)
•   Displacement:
•   2198.67 in3 ( 36 L)
•   Length: 101.096 in
•   (2567.84 mm)
•   Width: 30.8 in
•   (780 mm)
•   Height: 40 in
•   (1020 mm)

 
De Havilland Gipsy Eighteen
•   Type: Inverted W-18 inline piston engine
•   Bore: 4.646 in (118 mm)
•   Stroke: 5.512 in (140 mm)
•   Displacement:
•   1689.95 in3 (27.45 L)
•   Length: 82.6 in (2,098 mm)
•   Width: 54.55 in (1385.64 mm)
•   Height:  33.5 in (838 mm)

De Havilland Gipsy Twenty Four
•   Type: 90 degree X-24 inline piston engine
•   Bore: 4.646 in (118 mm)
•   Stroke: 5.512 in (140 mm)
•   Displacement:
•   2242.6 in3 (36.6 L)
•   Length: 82.6 in (2,098 mm)
•   Width: 44.54 in ( 1131.37 mm)
•   Height: 44.54 in ( 1131.37 mm)

De Havilland Gipsy Sixteen (inspired by Apophenia)
•   Type: Inverted 60 degree V-16 inline piston engine
•   Bore: 4.646 in (118 mm)
•   Stroke: 5.512 in (140 mm)
•   Displacement: 1495.067 in3
•   (24.4 L)
•   Length: 95.78 in ( 2432.69 mm)
•   Width: 31.5 in (800 mm)
•   Height: 37.4 in ( 950 mm)


De Havilland Gipsy Eight
•   Type: Inverted 90 degree V-8 inline piston engine
•   Bore: 4.646 in (118 mm)
•   Stroke: 5.512 in (140 mm)
•   Displacement: 747.53 in3
•   (12.248 L)
•   Length: 69.42 in (1763.31 mm)
•   Width: 44.54 in ( 1131.37 mm)
•   Height: 32.987 in ( 837.87 mm)

De Havilland Gipsy W Twelve
•   Type: Inverted W-12 inline piston engine
•   Bore: 4.646 in (118 mm)
•   Stroke: 5.512 in (140 mm)
•   Displacement:
•   1121.3 in3 (18.3 L)
•   Length: 69.42 in (1763.31 mm)
•   Width: 54.55 in (1385.64 mm)
•   Height: 33.5 in ( 838 mm)

Irbitis MI-02
•   Type: 36-cylinder air-cooled multi-bank piston aircraft engine
•   Bore: 4.646 in (118 mm)
•   Stroke: 5.512 in (140 mm)
•   Displacement:
•   3363.9 in³ (54.9 L)
•   Length: 82.6 in (2098 mm)
•   Width: 47.244 in (1200 mm)
•   Height: 43.307 in (1100 mm)

Napier Super Lion
•   Type: 24-cylinder water-cooled W-block (3 banks of 8 cylinders) aircraft piston engine
•   Bore: 5.5 in (139.7 mm)
•   Stroke: 5.125 in (130.17 mm)
•   Displacement: 2923.2 in³ ( 47.888 L)
•   Length: 85.05 in (2160.33 mm)
•   Width: 42.0 in (1067 mm)
•   Height: 43.5 in (1105 mm)

Napier Sabre H-32
•   Type: 32-cylinder supercharged liquid-cooled H-type aircraft piston engine
•   Bore: 5.0 in (127 mm)
•   Stroke: 4.75 in (121 mm)
•   Displacement: 2,986.67 in³ (48.867 L)
•   Length: 92.25 in (2,343 mm)
•   Width: 40 in (1,016 mm)
•   Height:46 in (1,168 mm)

Bristol Hercules ‘Major’
•   Type: 21-cylinder, three-row, supercharged, air-cooled radial engine
•   Bore: 5.75 in (146mm)
•   Stroke: 6.5 in (165mm)
•   Displacement: 3540 in³
•   (58.05 L)
•   Length: 60.9 in
•   ( 1547 mm)
•   Diameter: 55 in (1,397mm)

Bristol Hercules ‘Super Major’
•   Type: 28-cylinder, four-row, supercharged, air-cooled radial engine
•   Bore: 5.75 in (146mm)
•   Stroke: 6.5 in (165mm)
•   Displacement: 4720 in³
•   (77.4 L)
•   Length: 68.65 in
•   ( 1744 mm)
•   Diameter: 55 in (1,397mm)
28
Aerospace / Re: Sikorsky CH-53K Super Stallion Heavy Lift Replacement (HLR)
« Last post by yasotay on Yesterday at 05:43:28 pm »
$88M per if you don't include avionics... a decked out MH-47 (not a CH-47) is still less than the base 53K I think.  Seems a lot for an extra 2K of payload.  I could be wring here.
29
The Bar / Re: Nuclear Weapons - Discussion.
« Last post by Triton on Yesterday at 05:31:33 pm »

William J. Perry, former Secretary of Defense, and  General James E. Cartwright, former Vice Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff; former Commander, U.S. Strategic Command, again.

And?  Is that suppose to make them perfect?  As I recall, William Perry was the one who spilled the beans on the stealth bomber (B-2) to make his boss look good, no?
Don't care who it is evaluate what they said it's not a game of 'credential poker' hey I have two former SecDefs, an undersecretary and a physicist does that beat your experts in credential poker?

What I meant was that William J. Perry and General James E. Cartwright were back making the same arguments in The Washington Post opinion piece that we have already read in their letter to President Donald Trump.
30
Early Aircraft Projects / Re: Bloch MB-157
« Last post by blackkite on Yesterday at 05:31:06 pm »
Hi! Another MB.157 three side view drawing.
Indeed, the propeller's thrust line is tilted against the longitudinal axis of the aircraft.

https://arnor022.deviantart.com/art/Detail-Bloch-MB-157-570190059
https://www.the-blueprints.com/blueprints/ww2planes/various/82253/view/bloch_mb-157/
Gnome-Rhτne 14R engine.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SNECMA_14R
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