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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Interesting escape concepts.
« Last post by riggerrob on Today at 02:22:05 pm »
Yankee (aka Stanley) Extraction Seat Demo (production retrofit to some A-1 Skyraiders and to be used in the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft)
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Back in 1992, I started rigging for Butler Parachutes just as a bewildering array of Cold War-surplus airplanes arrived in the USA from: China, Russia, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, Yugoslavia, etc. The influx was so rapid that the FAA imposed a temporary import embargo until they could process all the applications already filed!
Many of them arrived with faded and frayed military parachutes 30 years old! Since hardly any of their pilot emergency parachutes were certified in the USA - and even fewer came with English-language manuals - Butler developed specialized harnesses and containers to fit into cramped cockpits in: Draken, Gemsbok, Gnat, Impala, Jet Cruiser, Nanjing, Pond Racer, RV KITPLANES, Scaled Composites, Yak, etc. plus newly-designed himebuilts and KITPLANES, a few NASA projects plus all the usual antiques, sailplanes and WW 2-surplus airplanes. We even had a couple contracts with the United States Coast Guard.  It was an exciting time to be a parachute digger!

Around 1995, Zvezda offered their new SKS-94 rocket extractor system for the latest Sukhoi and Yak aerobatic airplanes. The only jet installation was in the Pampa light jet trainer. I never heard of any RES sold in the USA. I suspect that the FAA banned Zvezda RES at the same time that they banned all explosive charges from ejection seats owned by civilians.

Circa 1998, I was repacking Softie pilot emergency parachutes for an RV KITPLANES owner/pilot. He mentioned that he had flown Douglas AD-1 Skyraiders during the Vietnam War. On two occasions, he tried to eject, but both times his Stanley Yankee Rocket Extractor System failed to fire! After the war, he enjoyed a lengthy career flying cargo with Flying Tiger Lines.

Trivia: when Pilatus struggled to refine spin characteristics on their PC-2 trainer, they borrowed a Stanley RES.
2
here is the Bristol Model-190 drawing,I have a good drawing to it,but where ?

Here is one, probably the same as yours.
The funny thing is that the source magazine for this image (Helicopter Life, Summer 2012) describes it as the "1954 -1957 Bristol Aircraft Type X 鏑ittle Henry.
To my knowledge, this was the nickname of the McDonnell XH-20 prototype, but I'd never seen it associated with any other type.
Also the designation "Type X" is not standard for Bristol.
The bibliography suggests that the author of the article used both Fairey Rotodyne by David Gibbings (History Press, 2009) and Helicopters and other Rotorcraft since 1907 by Kenneth Munson (Blandford Press, 1972) as his references, but the image is definitely not included in the latter and I don't have the former to check on it.
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I wonder whether this was ever actually published for sale as he died in 2014, maybe the draft document was donated to the RAeS. Harry Fraser-Mitchell was a member of the Handley-Page Association so may well have had access to original documents.
4
The so called  'Handley Page 70 ton' bomber was not related to
the HP-80. According to 'Handley Page aircraft since 1907' - Putnam, it was one of the tailless designs
resulting from the research done with the HP-75 . No illustrations.

p.s. Tony Buttler mentions a H.P 75 ton bomber in BSP Fighters and Bombers 1935-1950.

It seems unlikely that the "70-ton bomber" could have "resulted" from research done with the H.P.75.
Indeed, the Manx flew in 1946, while the bomber project in question exists in documents as early as 1943.
It would seem there is a fairly recent book that should contain some illustrations of it:

Quote
Handley Page Proposals for a 70-Ton Bomber (1943): a Commentary.
A H Fraser-Mitchell. Published by the author. 2014. 25pp. Illustrated.
Compares the project design with the evolution of the Convair B-36 Peacemaker.
5
as you see in the list,the Model-39 called Design C,maybe it was the V-3,only my suggesting.

NO. The so-called "V-3" design is in fact the Boeing Model 72, a commercial transport project with Wright Whirlwind engine, advertised in 1927 but never produced.
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Shorts S.B. 8 Helicopter Design
« Last post by TsrJoe on Today at 11:20:09 am »
I thought it made sense so as not to add another page for a very similar subject topic, possibly a thread rename required as it looks like the SB.8 designator may well be a misnomer ? how about Short helicopter and rotorcraft projects ?  B) anyway, it would be interesting to see any drawings on the proposals to give them context
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Short Helicopter Design
« Last post by Skyblazer on Today at 10:58:10 am »
http://studylib.net/doc/18769576/society-news---royal-aeronautical-society ... Proposal for a programme of work aimed at securing for Shorts a position in the world market for Rotary-Winged Aircraft, particularly in the private sector. PD.66/1. Short Brothers and Harland Limited, Belfast. September 1967. 47pp. Illustrated.Includes as appendices descriptions of the F H Robertson 然otacoupe, the McCandless single-seat gyroplane, Short PD66.00.11 4-5 seat autogiro design, Short PD59 Rotobus (a 29-seat autogiro design with fuselage accommodation identical to the PD80) and a report on autogiros  compiled by Arthur D Little for Shorts.

Yeah, saw this one too but didn't think it was appropriate for this thread about the S.B.8.
This and another reference I found both clearly point to the P.D.66 as being an autogyro project.
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Short Helicopter Design
« Last post by TsrJoe on Today at 09:46:20 am »
http://studylib.net/doc/18769576/society-news---royal-aeronautical-society ... Proposal for a programme of work aimed at securing for Shorts a position in the world market for Rotary-Winged Aircraft, particularly in the private sector. PD.66/1. Short Brothers and Harland Limited, Belfast. September 1967. 47pp. Illustrated.Includes as appendices descriptions of the F H Robertson 然otacoupe, the McCandless single-seat gyroplane, Short PD66.00.11 4-5 seat autogiro design, Short PD59 Rotobus (a 29-seat autogiro design with fuselage accommodation identical to the PD80) and a report on autogiros  compiled by Arthur D Little for Shorts.
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Shorts S.B. 8 Helicopter Design
« Last post by CJGibson on Today at 09:45:25 am »
Thanks Skyblazer,

That sounds more like what I'm looking for, a tip-driven parrot cage.

Chris
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Shorts S.B. 8 Helicopter Design
« Last post by hesham on Today at 09:28:50 am »
Nice Info my dear Skyblazer,

and here is a large drawings to SB.8.
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