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FORUM INDEX / Re: COMPANY: Vought (Chance Vought, LTV)
« Last post by snark on Today at 07:58:15 pm »
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vought_V-141#Specifications_(V-143_%E2%80%93_final_layout)


http://1000aircraftphotos.com/Contributions/PippinBill/10687.htm


Seems the IJN  "AXV" is actually the Vought V-143, the final iteration (via the V-141) of Northrop's 3-A single-seat fighter design

Harry

2
Space Projects / Re: What I wrote of Columbia, Feb-Mar '03
« Last post by Ray on Today at 07:41:28 pm »
Interesting read.
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Space Projects / What I wrote of Columbia, Feb-Mar '03
« Last post by trekkist on Today at 05:52:52 pm »
In 2003, I wrote in a white heat an essay on Columbia's loss, which took on the shuttle's history. I submitted this to "Harper's" and "The Atlantic," neither of which bought it.

Unrevised save for the addition of photos, it can be found on my personal website here:

http://www.missedthesixties.com/what-the-shuttles-were-and-why-they-are-gone/

I post this link not for ego-boo, although a few comments (to the site, as well as here) would be appreciated. In some 2 years, the site (admittedly rather sparse, and rarely updated) has attracted no comments save some 16,000 of Spam.
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https://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/12982617

Quote
The FALCON (Fission Activated Laser CONcept) reactor-pumped laser program at Sandia National Laboratories is examining the feasibility of high-power systems pumped directly by the energy from a nuclear reactor. In this concept we use the highly energetic fission fragments from neutron induced fission to excite a large volume laser medium. This technology has the potential to scale to extremely large optical power outputs in a primarily self-powered device. A laser system of this type could also be relatively compact and capable of long run times without refueling.
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Bell/NACA early studies for X-1
« Last post by Arjen on Today at 09:45:09 am »
For the umpteenth time the XS-1/X-1 did not have an all-moving tail, it had a conventional
horizontal stabilizer and elevator setup that could be trimmed in flight for pitch control, a different animal
from the slab tailplane and something that had been around since well before WWII.
That depends on how you look at it.

I've looked up the bit about the X-1's stabilizer in 'Yeager' by Chuck Yeager and Leo Janos. In the chapter 'Against the wall', Yeager describes how in early October 1947, on his seventh (?) powered flight in the X-1, flying at M 0.94 at 40,000ft, the elevator became wholly ineffective. After landing, flight data analysis showed a shock wave forming at the elevator's hinge point at just that speed. Jack Ridley then proposed, and I quote:
Quote
"Well, maybe Chuck can fly without using the elevator. Maybe he can get by using only the horizontal stabilizer."
The stabilizer was the winglike structure on the tail that stabilized pitch control. Bell's engineers had purposely built into them an extra control authority because they had anticipated elevator ineffectiveness caused by shock waves. This extra authority was a trim switch in the cockpit that would allow a small air motor to pivot the stabilizer up or down, creating a moving tail that could act as an auxiliary elevator by lowering or raising the airplane's nose. We were leery about trying it while flying at high speeds; instead, we set the trim on the ground and left it alone.
After thoroughly ground testing Ridley's idea, Albert Boyd agreed to trying it out in the air. Using the trim switch alone cured the control problem. The X-1 may have had a stabilizer and elevator setup, but its use as a de facto flying tail - something Bell's engineers had foreseen - enabled the X-1 to exceed M 0.94 in controlled flight.

So: intended to be used as a stablizer-elevator setup - found wanting - then used as an all-flying tail.
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Also an Info need a confirm,

there was a Project from Su-34 intended to be AEW aircraft ?,or for naval uses.
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Lockheed CL-1200 / X-27 Lancer
« Last post by hesham on Today at 05:25:07 am »
Good Info Archibald
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Early Aircraft Projects / Re: Aichi AM-15 light sports plane
« Last post by hesham on Today at 05:23:43 am »
Air Enthusiast, vol. 1 Nr 7, december 1971, p. 373 :
The Aichi AM-15 experimental shore-based fighter project apparently owing much to the Boeing P-26 was abandoned while still on the drawing boards.

Nice Info my dear.
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Early Aircraft Projects / Re: Aichi AM-15 light sports plane
« Last post by Boogey on Today at 03:55:59 am »
Air Enthusiast, vol. 1 Nr 7, december 1971, p. 373 :
The Aichi AM-15 experimental shore-based fighter project apparently owing much to the Boeing P-26 was abandoned while still on the drawing boards.
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