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Space Projects / Black Ops And The Shuttle
« Last post by Flyaway on Yesterday at 10:56:20 pm »
http://thespacereview.com/article/3390/1

Black ops and the shuttle (part 3-1): Recovering spent HEXAGON reconnaissance satellites with the space shuttle
by Dwayne A. Day
Monday, December 11, 2017


Quote
The James Bond movie You Only Live Twice started with a covert satellite sneaking up on an American spacecraft in orbit, swallowing it like an alligator and smuggling it back to Earth. But by the early 1980s, the American National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) began contemplating launching a space shuttle north out of Florida, dropping its solid rocket boosters off of Daytona Beach, and heading inland over the mid-Atlantic states overflying Cleveland, Ohio, and Canada. Once in orbit, it would open its payload bay doors, grab hold of a top-secret American HEXAGON reconnaissance satellite the size of a school bus, and bring it back to Earth. It was an audacious plan, not only because it would overfly the American and Canadian landmasses on its way to orbit, but also because it would first show up on Soviet radar as it rose over the North Pole—and they might be a little upset. “The political problems were agreed to be most difficult,” an NRO memo declared with remarkable understatement.
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Missile Projects / Re: Surface launched versions of Sea Skua and Sea Eagle.
« Last post by TomS on Yesterday at 07:30:41 pm »
Does anyone have any ideas of how big and heavy the box?? launcher for surface launched Sea Eagle would have been compared to that for Harpoon and Exocet MM38 and M40?

Very late reply here, but something in another thread prompted me to look into this.  Surface-launched Sea Eagle was known as P5T.

Design-wise, P5T was apparently very close to the zero-speed helicopter-launched version of Sea Eagle for the Indian Navy.

I haven't found an actual weight, but according to Friedman's World Naval Weapon Systems , British Aerospace claimed that three P5T could fit in the place (and presumably weight) of MM40 Exocet.  MM40 was around 1150 kg per canister,  which implies Sea Eagle SL was being claimed in the vicinity of 800kg including canister and boosters.  That seems low, since the bare air-launched  Sea Eagle was around 600 kg not including the strap-on boosters.

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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Sikorsky S-67 Blackhawk
« Last post by Pioneer on Yesterday at 05:40:15 pm »
Nice selection of photos.

I second that!!  :P

Regards
Pioneer
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Missile Projects / Re: Sub-Martel
« Last post by CNH on Yesterday at 04:59:58 pm »
Sub martel:

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Missile Projects / Re: Air-launched missile defence concept
« Last post by marauder2048 on Yesterday at 02:32:26 pm »
Northrop Grumman FTX-20 Experiment 2014

Northrop Grumman’s Distributed Aperture System demonstrates the ability to detect and track ballistic missile threats
and share the trajectory information across the battlespace via an airborne gateway.

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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Sikorsky S-67 Blackhawk
« Last post by 500 Fan on Yesterday at 01:11:49 pm »
Nice selection of photos.
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Sikorsky S-67 Blackhawk
« Last post by mil on Yesterday at 10:21:47 am »
no no everything is in order.
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Postwar Aircraft Projects / Re: Sikorsky S-67 Blackhawk
« Last post by stimpy75 on Yesterday at 10:01:09 am »
i hope it was ok that i shared them....are you also the one on pinterest?
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Missile Projects / Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Last post by sferrin on Yesterday at 09:34:33 am »
That looks more like a typical ATACMs than past Zombie shots.  (Wish I knew the particulars of that Zombie target missile.)

""We learn something new with each flight test. We get better at performing our checks, build-up and mission execution but it also paves the way for product improvements, such as our two-stage missile."

And THIS is why you test.
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Missile Projects / Re: Patriot SAM replacement
« Last post by bring_it_on on Yesterday at 09:01:53 am »
SMDC provides realistic threats for missile defense tests

Quote
The U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command Technical Center's Test Execution Support Division successfully launch a Sabre Zombie target at the McGregor Range on Fort Bliss, Texas, into White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, November 16, to provide a realistic threat ballistic missile target for use in testing advanced missile defense systems.
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SHOW CAPTION +
REDSTONE ARSTENAL, Alabama -- One U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/Army Forces Strategic Command team finds better ways for target testing.

Members of the USASMDC/ARSTRAT Technical Center, in support of the Program Executive Office Missiles and Space's Lower Tier Program Office, or LTPO, provided a realistic threat ballistic missile target for use in testing the Patriot Advanced Capability-3 Missile Segment Enhancement, or PAC-3 MSE, advanced missile defense systems.

"We had an excellent team executing this mission," said Kevin Creekmore, SMDC Test Execution Support Division, or TESD acting chief.

The TESD successfully launched a Sabre Zombie target at the McGregor Range on Fort Bliss, Texas, into White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, November 16.

Creekmore said the target was provided in support of operational testing of the PAC-3 MSE. Preliminary results show the target met all performance objectives and allowed the Patriot system to demonstrate new capabilities that can be provided to the Warfighter. The target carried an on-board hit detection system which provides data to assess the effectiveness of the interceptor's lethality against targets of this class.

"The TESD mission is to provide end-to-end test planning, design, development, integration and test execution, as well as flexible launch platforms and unique low-cost target solutions," Creekmore said. "The Sabre Zombie target is another valuable assets in the low-cost suite of targets that provide solutions for integration missile defense developmental and operational testing, as well as foreign military sales applications.

"This mission was a repeat of a planned Sabre launch in June which was aborted due to an anomalous condition that occurred shortly before scheduled firing," he added. "Following an extensive anomaly investigation, actions were taken to correct the issue. Significant testing was performed to verify the correction which was further validated in the successful target launch."

Creekmore added that the mission was a challenge because it was the third mission supported by the same small team over the previous 12 months. It is a very small government and contractor team and required dedication from the team to support the multiple mission is a short timeframe.

"Throughout my eight-year career at SMDC, I have been a part of 10 ballistic missile flight tests. I have been fortunate enough to serve as the Target Test Director for the last two Sabre missions," said Christopher Cain Crouch, TESD general engineer. "That role is filled with excitement from the beginning of the five-hour countdown right up through the launch, but the most exciting part of the countdown is definitely when the clock hits zero. At launch, you feel the rumble underneath your feet, and your entire body trembles from the rocket motor vibration and the noise. That's the only place in the world where you can get that feeling. It's indescribable."

Crouch said the most important lesson he has learned from testing is that teamwork is critical to mission success.

"No matter how intelligent any one individual may be, he or she cannot launch a missile by themselves," he said. "Every mission is dependent on each team member performing his or her role to the best of their ability. I also believe that communication is key, and that teams can always improve communication processes. We can always improve our communication among our Government team, our contractors, the test range, and our customers.

"We have the most professional team I've ever been a part of," Crouch added. "Everyone on our team works extremely hard and will fill any role with absolutely no complaints. This is attributed to the extremely high-character individuals we have on this team and the leadership."

One team member said the mission was a complete success and they were very pleased with the performance achieved.

"We looked for actuator, fin and battery performance during this test. Everything worked great," said Stephanie Chrisley, TESD general engineer. "We learn something new with each flight test. We get better at performing our checks, build-up and mission execution but it also paves the way for product improvements, such as our two-stage missile.

Sabre is a low-cost target with a wide range of capabilities which can be used for a variety of scenarios and for a variety of customers," she added. "Flexible low-cost targets will allow the Army to test more often. Testing frequently helps us perfect each iteration of updates to our systems and ultimately helps the Warfighter."
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