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Military / Re: Nuclear Weapons NEWS ONLY
« Last post by sferrin on Today at 06:40:40 pm »
http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/can-america-prevent-russia-using-low-yield-nukes-24861

"The threat of Russian first use involving limited nuclear strikes was recognized by the Obama administration. In October 2016, Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter stated that “…it’s a sobering fact that the most likely use of nuclear weapons is not the massive nuclear exchange of the classic Cold War-type, but rather the unwise resort to smaller but still unprecedentedly terrible attacks, for example, by Russia or North Korea to try to coerce a conventionally superior opponent to back off or abandon an ally during a crisis.”[2] As Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis has stated, “We want to make certain they recognize that we can respond in kind and that we don't have to go with the high yield weapon.”[3]

Domestic opposition to this NPR decision appears to be largely ideological and ignores the disparity in such weapons that now exists and Russia’s doctrine with regards to the first use of nuclear weapons. There is nothing new about low-yield warheads on ballistic missiles. In addition to Russia, the UK and France reportedly have low-yield ballistic missile warheads on their SLBMs.[4]

Russia reportedly has acquired low-yield, precision low-yield and low-collateral damage nuclear weapons. This was originally reported by distinguished Russian journalist Pavel Felgenhauer who wrote in 2002 that in April 1999 the Russian National Security Council approved a concept for developing and using “…non-strategic low- and flexible-yield battlefield weapons,” and that the yield of these precision weapons would be tens or hundreds of tons of TNT.[5] “Flexible yield” is clearly what we call variable yield or dial a yield. New Russian low-yield nuclear weapons are reported in the Russian press including in the state media."
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Military / Re: Nuclear Weapons NEWS ONLY
« Last post by bobbymike on Today at 04:58:57 pm »
https://www.defensenews.com/congress/2018/05/22/democrats-fight-pentagon-push-for-battlefield-nukes/

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WASHINGTON — House Democrats are fighting on multiple fronts to block the Trump administration from developing a new tactical nuclear weapon, and the debate threatens to turn into a partisan fight on the House floor.

House Armed Services Committee Democrats broadly backed a failed amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act earlier this month that would have stripped the bill’s proposed sea-launched, low-yield nuclear warhead.

Democrats have not given up and since proposed multiple NDAA amendments that are hostile to the weapons. The bill is set to be considered on the House floor this week, and on Tuesday, the panel’s top Democrat, Rep. Adam Smith, of Washington, said the fight isn’t over.

“I wouldn’t even describe it as unease. We are inalterably opposed to it,” Smith told reporters, adding that low-yield nukes are “a mistake.”

https://www.defensenews.com/congress/2018/05/23/house-rejects-limit-on-new-nuclear-warhead/?utm_campaign=Socialflow&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social

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WASHINGTON — The U.S. House on Wednesday shot down a proposed limit on the Trump administration’s pursuit of a low-yield nuclear weapon.

It was among several amendments to the House draft of the 2019 National Defense Authorization Act that were voted down Wednesday afternoon. Of the 558 amendments filed for the NDAA debate this week, the House Rules Committee made in order 271 of them and the House voted to adopt 98 of them Tuesday night.

The rejected amendment would have fenced half the 2019 funding for low-yield nuclear warhead development in lieu of an assessment of its impact on strategic stability and options to reduce the risk of miscalculation. Reps. Jim Garamendi, D-Calif., and Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore., sponsored it.
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Military / Re: Nuclear Weapons NEWS ONLY
« Last post by bobbymike on Today at 04:55:54 pm »
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MOSCOW, May 21. /TASS/. Project 955B Borei-B strategic nuclear-powered submarines have stayed outside Russia’s state armament program for 2018-2027 and after 2023 Russia will build six more Project 955A Borei-A subs, a source in the domestic defense sector told TASS on Monday.

As was reported earlier, work on the conceptual design of the improved Project 955B submarines with the new water jet propulsion system and onboard equipment was expected to begin from 2018. Their development was included in the draft state armaments program and a series of four such submarines was planned to be built.


More:
http://tass.com/defense/1005356
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Aerospace / Re: Chengdu J-20 news, pictures, analysis Part III
« Last post by Blitzo on Today at 04:18:19 pm »
Nobody mentioned that maybe the Indians' did detect the J-20... But did the J-20 have the final definitive (F-35 type-chevron-axisymmetric) nozzle on during the supposed detection. That would make a big difference, no?

In service J-20s certainly are not flying with serrated F-35 nozzles -- but would it make that big of a difference in this case?
For example, if F-35's F-135 serrated nozzle was replaced with a nozzle more akin to, say what the F110 on an F-16 has, how much bigger of an RCS would it have to allow the IAF commander to make such ambitious claims?

My suspicion, assuming the IAF commander isn't just making stuff up for political reasons, is the J-20s likely had luneberg lenses, and either the IAF recognizes they had luneberg lenses and are choosing to report it anyway for PR where such talk is of little consequence, or that the IAF did not realize the J-20s had luneberg lenses on which would be a much bigger concern.



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Did the Indians claim Radio/Radar detection, IR detection, or both?

Pretty sure they were claiming Su-30 radar and "ordinary radar stations"  ;) are able to detect J-20. So RF.

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"The Sukhoi's radar can see them. The new Chinese jets are not so invisible after all. No special technology is required to detect the J-20, as it can be detected by ordinary radar stations," Indian Air Force commander Arup Shaha said.
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Aerospace / Re: Chengdu J-20 news, pictures, analysis Part III
« Last post by kcran567 on Today at 02:44:36 pm »
Nobody mentioned that maybe the Indians' did detect the J-20... But did the J-20 have the final definitive (F-35 type-chevron-axisymmetric) nozzle on during the supposed detection. That would make a big difference, no?

Flat nozzles were mentioned in an earlier post, doesn't the F-35s nozzle match or surpass the F-22s?

Did the Indians claim Radio/Radar detection, IR detection, or both?
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Designation Systems / Re: Handley Page aircraft
« Last post by Apophenia on Today at 02:43:33 pm »
Chris: Kites, Birds and Stuff - Handley Page Aircraft, P. D. Stemp, Lulu Press, July 2011

Page 99: "Handley Page H.P.122 - A project for a V.T.O.L. type, during 1961. Powered by four Rolls-Royce Tyne engines."

Stéphane: Great stuff ... corrections/additions made. Thanks for confirm the Type X designation :) And I too would like to know what H.P.48 and H.P.49 were reserved for!

A few other responses ...

Finding dates for HP designs was crazy-making  :o I too have seen Bluebird listed as a 1909 type. The Type A first flew on 26 May 1910, so I went with that. But now I'm doubting my choice on the Type B (with its convoluted history). Finished in 1909 but abandoned by HP before flying, the 'B was flown in 1910 as the Plane Limited Biplane. But, this is an HP list, so 1909 seems to be the important date.

I've seen both "Antiseptic" and "Yellow Peril" applied to the Type D/H.P.4 and the Type E/H.P.5.

Type S: Doh! I had the HPS as Type S in the 'H.P.' listings but forgot to add it to the second Letter Types  :-[

Type T: Still confused about this one. Are you saying that (in the second series), the Type T was the H.P.19 Hanley while the Type Ta was its development, the H.P.25 Hendon? That would certainly make sense.
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Military / Re: Nuclear Weapons NEWS ONLY
« Last post by sferrin on Today at 02:10:30 pm »
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Early Aircraft Projects / Re: Various Blohm und Voss projects
« Last post by newsdeskdan on Today at 01:55:04 pm »
Is the CIOS report a paper copy or a softcopy? I would really like to see it!
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Aerospace / Re: Chengdu J-20 news, pictures, analysis Part III
« Last post by Blitzo on Today at 01:53:19 pm »
Well, Chengdu does appear to take many cues from Western VLO designs through both publicly available information and (very likely) espionage.

Considering most international stealth fighter projects that are emerging take quite a fewcues from designs first pioneered by US stealth fighters, yeah.
Tbh this is something that I've never contested since we first saw the photos of J-20 back in late 2010. It would have been concerning if J-20 did not feature similar stealth shaping principles to other stealth fighters.

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Even VLO shaping itself consists of tradeoffs and compromises. While the stealth of the J-20 is no doubt more complex and nuanced than what most of us can eyeball, it's likely that engineer from a company with extensive VLO experience like Lockheed would be able to identify design features that he wouldn't agree with, at least from a VLO perspective.

Assuming that the article is not talking out of its backside and they actually managed to get a LockMart scientist or engineer to make a serious and informed comment about the J-20 based off various photos -- the statement itself is still so damn vague that one could ascribe whatever meaning to it that we wanted.

Even we are able to easily ID a few points of J-20's design and configuration which are obviously not as stealthy as it could be. The current Al-31 engines for example have round nozzles without serrations. The actuators under the wing are F-22 style rather than flat like the F-35. So is that what the guy means?

Or, is it more extreme like what some people here suggested, like CAC literally copy and pasted bits and pieces from F-22 and F-35 without actually thinking about what they were doing and applying their own R&D?



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But again, the J-20 doesn't need to compete with the F-22 in every characteristics to be able to perform its intended mission.

Agree, but also not really what this discussion over the last few pages seems to have been about. Rather, the discussion is more about interpreting what on earth the Lockmart guy meant.
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Space Projects / Re: Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope
« Last post by Flyaway on Today at 01:43:33 pm »
WFIRST’s second chance

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There’s a saying often used in the space community that you’re not a real NASA mission until you’ve been threatened with cancellation. There is some truth to that: many NASA missions that ultimately were successful faced the threat of termination, either by the agency or Congress. For example, the new book Chasing New Horizons is filled with near-death experiences for the New Horizons mission to Pluto (see “Review: Chasing New Horizons”, The Space Review, April 30, 2018)

http://www.thespacereview.com/article/3497/1
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