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Author Topic: Rumpler Twin-Hull Flying Boat  (Read 4261 times)

Offline McTodd

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Rumpler Twin-Hull Flying Boat
« on: December 18, 2007, 01:15:25 pm »
The thread on Great War projects reminded me to look at Fred Gutschow's 'Die Deutschen Flugboote', which has information on Rumpler's magnificent giant flying boat designs. So with great delight, I found a three-page article in Flight, on their wonderful web archive, which some of you may enjoy:

http://www.flightglobal.com/PDFArchive/View/1930/Untitled0%20-%201553.html

Attached are a couple of photos from the article of a model.

Online Jemiba

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Re: Rumpler Twin-Hull Flying Boat
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2007, 09:19:58 am »
There are some more informations in "Edmund Rumpler - Wegbereiter in der
industriellen Flugzeugfertigung" by J.A.Kranzhoff, Bernard & Graefe (publisher).
(3-view as an example)
It takes a long time, before all mistakes are made ...

Libelle

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Re: Rumpler Twin-Hull Flying Boat
« Reply #2 on: January 19, 2008, 03:17:32 pm »
Concept drawing for the Howard Hughes HK-1 flying boat. A similar design...
« Last Edit: January 19, 2008, 03:19:32 pm by Libelle »

Offline Cy-27

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Re: Rumpler Twin-Hull Flying Boat
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2016, 12:41:10 am »
There was an article on this project in the December 1930 issue of the American magazine Aero Digest (see attached).

Offline Tony Williams

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Re: Rumpler Twin-Hull Flying Boat
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2016, 01:07:23 am »
These twin-hulled flying boats (actual and proposed) have always intrigued me. They seem a logical way of providing more stability on the water, but I do wonder about what happened on landing if one hull hit a wave while the other was still out of the water. I assume that the thing violently zig-zagged all over the place until both hulls were well into the water.
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Offline Loren

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Re: Rumpler Twin-Hull Flying Boat
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2016, 06:58:40 am »
Tony -

I would say that the answers to your questions would be the Savoia-Marchetti S.55 that seemed not to have any such issues. Can't answer for larger aircraft but I have not seen any issues were reported
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Offline Tony Williams

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Re: Rumpler Twin-Hull Flying Boat
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2016, 11:28:40 am »
It would obviously depend on the roughness of the water. In smooth water such as a protected anchorage, no problem. Logic suggests that if the waves were big enough for only one hull to hit one, there would be a massive increase in drag on that hull, which would tend to slew the plane sideways unless the other hull got in the water quickly.
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Offline hesham

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Offline hesham

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