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Author Topic: The US Space Force  (Read 9664 times)

Online sferrin

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Re: The US Space Force
« Reply #15 on: March 15, 2018, 06:52:23 am »
To be clear, I didn't even necessarily mean a deployed capability, more along the lines of pursuing the equivalent of being nuclear latent state / nuclear threshold state, but when it comes to space-borne weapons (e.g. The U.S. has the goal of eventually being able to deploy a substantial number of FOBS or strike capable satellites within a couple of years of getting the green light).

There is ZERO evidence that the US intends to develop a FOBS system or nuclear-armed satellites.  There is no evidence they're even researching the capability.


For the record, this is what I wrote:

The United States is pursuing hypersonics, space based weapons, and pulling out of disarmament treaties.

Again, the US is NOT pursuing "space based weapons".  If it is, name the system or program.  As for hypersonics, that's hardly controversial given both Russia and China are AHEAD of the US.  As for pulling out of treaties I have a difficult time faulting the US for that when the other side isn't abiding by them. Why should we unilaterally hobble ourselves?
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Offline Triton

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Re: The US Space Force
« Reply #16 on: March 15, 2018, 10:49:50 pm »
I wonder if a Department of the Space Force would take over the programs of the Missile Defense Agency to develop anti-ballistic missile defense and the ground-based strategic deterrent from the United States Air Force in addition to being responsible for satellite launches and satellite defense. Further, how many journalists and laypersons had visions of Space Marines when President Trump advocated a "Space Force?"
« Last Edit: March 16, 2018, 12:34:14 pm by Triton »

Offline Archibald

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Re: The US Space Force
« Reply #17 on: March 16, 2018, 02:46:37 am »
Who needs Shuttle noawadays, even with racing strippes ? imagine the number of laser-armed space marines a BFS could carry... (we really need a remake of Moonraker, either cheesy or serious, I don't care)
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Offline Foo Fighter

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Re: The US Space Force
« Reply #18 on: March 16, 2018, 03:32:24 am »
More likely to be accepted for funding as cheesy, serious does not get the moolah in cinema.

Online sferrin

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Re: The US Space Force
« Reply #19 on: March 16, 2018, 04:53:20 am »
Who needs Shuttle noawadays, even with racing strippes ? imagine the number of laser-armed space marines a BFS could carry... (we really need a remake of Moonraker, either cheesy or serious, I don't care)

Ahem:
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Online sferrin

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Re: The US Space Force
« Reply #20 on: March 16, 2018, 05:35:02 am »
Or how about a manned reusable space "fighter" stuck to the end of a Falcon 9 1st stage?  Maybe a larger X-37 with enough fuel to make it the rest of the way to orbit (with the 1st stage having enough fuel to land at sea or back at the launch site), maneuver in orbit, and deorbit for a glide back to base. Would this even be possible?  That is, would a Block 5 Falcon 9 have enough oomph to put something of that description where it could get the rest of the way to orbit?
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Offline Triton

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Re: The US Space Force
« Reply #21 on: March 16, 2018, 02:53:47 pm »
Who needs Shuttle noawadays, even with racing strippes ? imagine the number of laser-armed space marines a BFS could carry... (we really need a remake of Moonraker, either cheesy or serious, I don't care)

Elon Musk is Hugo Drax?  :o

Offline kcran567

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Re: The US Space Force
« Reply #22 on: March 16, 2018, 04:05:44 pm »
"Submarine" type armed space vehicles like a "space Navy":


Offline bobbymike

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Re: The US Space Force
« Reply #23 on: March 17, 2018, 12:44:19 am »
http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pages/2018/March%202018/New-Funding-Enough-to-Counter-Space-Threats-AFSPC-Commander-Says.aspx?utm_source=&utm_medium=&utm_campaign=

Quote
The Air Force bolstered its space budget by 18 percent, or $7 billion over the five-year future years defense program, in an effort to increase its capabilities and ensure the United States keeps pace with other countries in space, Air Force Space Command chief Gen. Jay Raymond said Thursday.

His remarks during a brief public session of the House Armed Services Strategic Forces Subcommittee were questioned by Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.), who pointed to successful Chinese test launches of several anti-satellite missiles, a development he said “fundamentally alters the strategic balance between great powers,” which has “continued to evolve in favor of China” as it has “accelerated development of space weapons.”
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Offline NeilChapman

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Re: The US Space Force
« Reply #24 on: March 18, 2018, 10:25:01 am »
Or how about a manned reusable space "fighter" stuck to the end of a Falcon 9 1st stage?  Maybe a larger X-37 with enough fuel to make it the rest of the way to orbit (with the 1st stage having enough fuel to land at sea or back at the launch site), maneuver in orbit, and deorbit for a glide back to base. Would this even be possible?  That is, would a Block 5 Falcon 9 have enough oomph to put something of that description where it could get the rest of the way to orbit?


That's a $60million launch, no? Maybe $18-30million if purchased in bulk?

I don't understand what the mission would be.  Why a manned fighter in space, launched from the ground.  If you wanted manned fighters in space would it not make sense to assemble them in space?  There is so much less complexity if you remove the restrictions of getting an assembled vehicle into orbit (weight, size, shape). Why not take them up in pieces and connect the parts in space?

The hitch is getting humans into space.  Neither Crew Dragon or CST-100 will fly until the end of the year.  Price per launch is expected to be $654 and $405million, respectively.  There doesn't seem to be any economy of scale until BFS is realized.

Interesting read...

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/archive/nasa/casi.ntrs.nasa.gov/20170008895.pdf





Online marauder2048

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Re: The US Space Force
« Reply #25 on: March 19, 2018, 11:14:29 pm »
Sigh...in an alternate history the first brilliant pebbles that were orbited as part of GPALS would
be nearing retirement this year. 

While there are countermeasures to space based interceptors they look to be pretty complex/costly.

Offline Orionblamblam

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Re: The US Space Force
« Reply #26 on: March 20, 2018, 09:19:39 am »

The hitch is getting humans into space.  Neither Crew Dragon or CST-100 will fly until the end of the year.  Price per launch is expected to be $654 and $405million, respectively. 

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Offline Orionblamblam

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Re: The US Space Force
« Reply #27 on: March 20, 2018, 09:21:06 am »
Sigh...in an alternate history the first brilliant pebbles that were orbited as part of GPALS would
be nearing retirement this year. 

While there are countermeasures to space based interceptors they look to be pretty complex/costly.

Is there more to that "fractionated Trident" document?
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Online marauder2048

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Re: The US Space Force
« Reply #28 on: March 20, 2018, 11:31:28 am »
Is there more to that "fractionated Trident" document?

Attached.

Online sferrin

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Re: The US Space Force
« Reply #29 on: March 20, 2018, 04:10:42 pm »
Sigh...in an alternate history the first brilliant pebbles that were orbited as part of GPALS would
be nearing retirement this year. 

While there are countermeasures to space based interceptors they look to be pretty complex/costly.

Is there more to that "fractionated Trident" document?

There have been others in the past as well:

http://www.astronautix.com/n/n11gr.html

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